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New FBI Documents Provide Details on Government's Surveillance Spyware

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posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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New FBI Documents Provide Details on Government's Surveillance Spyware


www.eff.org

The documents discuss technology that, when installed on a target's computer, allows the FBI to collect the following information:

•IP Address
•Media Access Control (MAC) address
•"Browser environment variables"
•Open communication ports
•List of the programs running
•Operating system type, version, and serial number
•Browser type and version
•Language encoding
•The URL that the target computer was previously connected to
•Registered computer name
•Registered company name
•Currently logged in user name
•Other information that would assist with "id
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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This was passed on to me by an associate. He considered it significant news. The article discusses a government spyware program called CCIPAV and states: "It is clear from the documents we received that the FBI—and likely other federal agencies—have used this tool a lot."

I am not a techie, so my ability to evaluate this material is limited. However, like many of you I am intensely concerned with my privacy. I am hoping someone with more IT or computer understanding would be kind enough to comment in this thread.

As for the rest of us, as always, I find govenment snooping on private citizens to be an unconscionable but perhaps inevitable side-effect of rapid technological develpment. As a society, we have not yet digested all the implications of this, but as free men and women we must constantly be vigilant against government overreaches of power, both real and potential.

Be safe, ATS.

www.eff.org
(visit the link for the full news article)

edit on 4/30/11 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:10 PM
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wikileaks 'insurance' file
lol



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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Why would anyone assume that this isn't out there?

Right now on my laptop, connected to free wifi... Several windows programs that I don't use EVER have been opened and running, and not by me... I didn't even know I have "windows meeting space", but it has been accessed and opened by someone.

By the way, I am a target, I expect this, and they will never find anything on any of my known computers and other internet accessing devices.

There are so many back doors built into every operating system out there, only a fool would assume that no one could get into their "stuff"




posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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The list is hardly earth shattering. Most of it can be determined from 5 minutes sharing a WiFi connection.

2nd line.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by mirageofdeceit
The list is hardly earth shattering. Most of it can be determined from 5 minutes sharing a WiFi connection.

2nd line.


BUT... This is an infection in a targeted PC, that cannot be detected nor removed... A bit more sinister no?

Also, what is made public that can be done with this "tool" is far from what actually can be done with it... A targeted user would NEVER know it was happening to them.

Well, most average people wouldn't know.




posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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How many of YOU, ATS users have been infected with this "spyware"?

Inquiring minds want to know... Maybe all of the site staff and owners have been infected as well.

Come on boys, you know what you are looking for, but you don't know who has it... It would be logical for you to have used this tool in this case... Right?

Good luck.





posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 

Don't forget the chinese make all the chips and the material 95% that makes the chips comes from there. This would give them a hidden hardware backdoor without anyone knowing about it.

This could also explain why government systems are being hacked as well, and maybe they are anonymous!



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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First off my background, I'm a Networked Systems Engineer, or "IT Guy" I've been in the field for 8 years now. Anyone with the basic network/ system skill can easily capture this info and with a bit of tweaking monitor real time. Various free remote access tools and utilities have this functionality built in.

Everything and everywhere you go on the Internet you are tracked/ logged. Not only on your machine but any system your machine communicates with. So while you clear your cookies there is copy on the host machine ready to restore itself once you log back in. Humans are creatures of habit and real world or virtual that holds true.

At best you could use a proxy but often the free versions are as bad at tracking you for monetary reasons. You could go with a paid version but it's hard not to have a paper trail on the web with Credit card purchases.

Now I'm sure you've all heard about the Android/ Apple tracking in phones and handhelds, I'm sure others are guilty of the same thing but now are taking steps so that functionality isn't discovered or removing it. Phones are the worst offenders of tracking and reporting. Having Wifi/ Blue tooth enabled only helps the cell tower triangulation to be more accurate.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by IncognitoGhostman
 


China hardly leads in wafer fabrication. Mostly they just make PCBs and populated them in factory so horrible the employees jump to their death. Check out
world semi capacity



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 11:46 PM
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This reminds me of the infamous "Pifts.exe" insanity Norton was involved with a couple years ago.

SCI: Tech Fears Arise Over Norton and Pifts.exe

It all started when people were being prompted by Norton whether or not to allow "Pifts.exe" to run right after Norton released an update to their security suite. People started posting about it in the Norton forums wondering what the heck it was.

What did Norton do? They deleted every single thread regarding "pifts.exe" they could find. You could imagine what that kind of thing would cause on ATS. People tend to get a little P.O'd when you start deleting their threads for no apparent reason. Especially when tech support hangs up on you, transfers you to other people for hours on end, etc..

That was just the beginning.

Those with the know-how were posting on ATS that the file/process somehow communicated with users' internet browsers, among other things, and were sending user-specific information directly to Norton.

Norton folks eventually had the cahones to post a huge apology on ATS about the entire ordeal. But that didn't exactly give ATS'ers that warm fuzzy feeling.

Big companies like Norton, Mcafee, etc.. could easily implant a process with an update or alter a pre-existing process to log user-specific browsing data and other information without your knowledge. The infrastructure that would be required to log all of that data would be astonishing. That means if any company is logging user-specific data on web browsing habits, browser type, etc.. It would amount to domestic intelligence gathering.

We already know that is already happening, legally, under the guise of big federal contracts to companies like "Total Intelligence Solutions" (which is a sister company of Blackwater) and has been going on for years starting with the Bush administration after 9/11.

These contracts are extremely high-end, lucrative, and it is an area of the private sector we never hear anything about and for good reason.

I was doing research into Blackwater in 2008 when I heard that "Total Intelligence Solutions" would be the new "Domestic Intelligence Gathering" arm of the Blackwater enterprise. Who did they pick for their CEO? A man named J. Cofer Black who, it turns out, is a 30 year veteran of the CIA.

The entire industry operates in the shadows and probably has the ability to operate with complete legal impunity. They would have to. It is usually illegal for the CIA or FBI to conduct domestic intelligence gathering. For the CIA, it has to involve foreign nationals in the USA. For the FBI, it has to involve specific cases and/or the protection of U.S. officials. This helps explain why AT&T was involved in a lawsuit a couple years ago after being caught with domestic spying stations all over the U.S. which were forwarding "information of interest" directly to agencies like the NSA.

Since the government can farm it out to the lowest bidder, they can have private companies do their dirty work and do it legally.

My bro Davespanners authored a really interesting thread recenently called
Want to know who really monitors your internet activity?
So here's a big bump to that one too! Enjoy.

-ChriS
edit on 30-4-2011 by BlasteR because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by Semaphore527
 


There are two situations here. One is tracking location, and the other is sniffing the computer. Cell phones clearly are easy to track. In theory, the wireless provider will give law enforcement your location via a website created strictly for LEOs, but a warrant is required. It is arguable that a national security letter is enough. It depends on the spine of the wireless provider. [AT&T=Spineless]

Android and Apple log your location in an unencrypted file. There seems to be no restriction on these logs, so your location can be tracked by any one that can see the file.

As far as sniffing the computer, there is no argument that the IP address, browser, and operating system get logged by the web server. It is kind of hard to display a webpage without the address to send the data. [Proxy can hide the address, but the proxy holder knows your address.]

Blackberries are FIPS 149-2 rated, though you have to read the fine print. If you crank up the security on a blackbbery,, it will deliberately forget passwords. There is a certain garbage collection procedure in the java that gets performed to clear out user data. Basically a blackberry is so good that India tried to have it's security software weakened since Pakistani terrorists allegdedly used them in an attack. So other than location data, a blackberry is probably more secure than a windows PC or mac. [Safari is full of security holes/] On a public wireless network, tethering throgh your blackberry provides some protection.

Note also that blackberries route their web browsing through BIS (blackerry internet service). Essentially it is a proxied service Such a scheme is less likely to have an issue with man in the middle attacks. Opera is also proxied.

On your desktop, prevent binaries from being installed by running windows from a user rather than administrator account, or run linux.

If you have a wifi router, kismet can see the addresses of all devices on the network. MAC too IIRC. Kismet can also be your friend in that it can detect spoofing.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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the only way to privacy is to disconnect.

Then within 10 mins, you have
predator drones over your head.

"Citizen, you must connect back to
the internet else hellfire missiles
will be implemented. You have 10
seconds to comply."

Sounds like a 21st century Orwell novel.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
Why would anyone assume that this isn't out there?

Right now on my laptop, connected to free wifi... Several windows programs that I don't use EVER have been opened and running, and not by me... I didn't even know I have "windows meeting space", but it has been accessed and opened by someone.

By the way, I am a target, I expect this, and they will never find anything on any of my known computers and other internet accessing devices.

There are so many back doors built into every operating system out there, only a fool would assume that no one could get into their "stuff"




And why are you a target? Please explain.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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Two firefox addons you should consider. One is ghostery, which shows who is spying on you as you surf.
ghostery

The other is the duckduckgo search engine. [I really hate these stupid names.]
duckduckgo
There is a https version of if, making packet sniffing a waste of time.

Oh, and if you want to see a website that doesn't use google analytics or any of that spyware:
shameless plug
You can even run the lazygranch "no script" without a hassle.
no script
The website has the standard apache logs, but I rarely look at them.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


So what else is new.
Kremlin being the headquarters of the tptb, even ats is no saint.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 

LOL - much closer to the truth than most people think. I am constantly amazed that people are so unconcerned about how much is known about them through Internet monitoring techniques. Want to know how much they're seeing right now? Check - browserspy.dk...



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Honestly, I wouldn't really care if the FBI monitered what I do on the computer. I have nothing to hide, so why would I care? They probably only look at peoples computer who they suspect are up to something bad. There not going to care about the average persons browsing history but if someones looking at childs porn or are a threat to security I`m sure they pay attention to theirs.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by inanna1234
 

That's how government control & intrusion usually starts. "I'm not doing anything illegal, so I don't care." Then one day after seizing complete control of the Internet & eliminating our rights to privacy, they suddenly redefine what is illegal and surprise, surprise - you're guilty of whatever they've decided, because you didn't care about your rights in the first place.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by inanna1234
There not going to care about the average persons browsing history but if someones looking at childs porn or are a threat to security I`m sure they pay attention to theirs.

just WHO makes that determination of
who is naughty or nice ???

it use to be a judge

now it is by ..... by ......
who knows ???

some people are paranoid
even if they are innocent.

Plus, the Patriot Act was illegally passed
to hunt terrorists. Now the tech is being
used on common criminals. Sounds a
lot like misappropriations to me.



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