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Electrons liquid?

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posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 09:28 PM
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I keep bumping into the idea that an electron is considered both, a particle and a wave. Is it possible that in the subatomic world electrons are comparable to a liquid in the regular world? I've stirred a cup of hot coffee and a drip would fall off the stirrer, back into the coffee. Only, the drip doesn't break the surface tension right away and spins about as a nice little sphere. Then the surface tension breaks and accepts the drop. Does this sound anything like an electron to you?




posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Ah excellent visual analogy....IMO of course
You are definitly on to something..



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 12:42 AM
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In Quantum Electrodynamics - most particles are considered virtual in nature. This means, effectively, that the particle exists as a medium for the exchange of information and then it vanishes. It has been the topic of serious debate as to whether these particles -really- exist, or if they are simply a mathematical construct.

Max Born has this to say: "The question of whether the waves are something 'real' or a function to describe and predict phenomena in a convenient way is a matter of taste. I personally like to regard a probability wave, even in 3N-dimensional space, as a real thing, certainly as more than a tool for mathematical calculations. ... Quite generally, how could we rely on probability predictions if by this notion we do not refer to something real and objective? (Max Born, Dover publ., 1964, 'Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance', p. 107)"

www.spaceandmotion.com...

Personally - I see it as an exchange of information (no matter how you look at it). Whether the world we interact with actually exists or not is rather irrelevant as the exchange of information leading to our perception of surroundings makes it real.



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