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The REAL STAR of Bethlehem by RICK LARSON

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posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Did a search on this and did not find one as explained by Rick Larson. A lawyer by profession became interested in the star of Bethlehem by chance. From his research his findings will be challenging to many, he puts his finding in a very neat and concise format.
Thanks goes to youtuber, Mr2tuff for introducing me to this very interesting series.


Was the Star of Bethlehem a real astronomical event? A myth created by the early church? Explore the history and science for yourself...
www.bethlehemstar.net...



edit on 29-4-2011 by hawaii50th because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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Get out your King James Bible and your Strong's Exhaustive Concordance with hebrew and Greek dictionary's included and follow along with me.

The word star in the King James version is translated from the Greek word ashtare.

If you go to the definition of ashtare you will see that it has two definitions that are contextual in nature.

The definition is strew, to strew, or strewn.

The first contextual definition is to strew low as when you strew seed grain on the ground when sowing it for a new crop.

The second contextual definition is to strew high as when grain that has just been threshed is strewn into the air to winnow it or separate the grain from the chaff. In biblical days this was done by placing some of the grain in a flat woven basket or more properly a pallet. The grain was then strewn into the air in a sweeping motion to separate it physically in space to facilitate the action of the wind blowing the chaff away as the grain falls to the ground.

It is the second contextual definition we are concerned with. The path of the grain in the air as it is strewn is an arc very similar to the path of a comet in the sky. So the Magi were following a light strewn across the sky very much like a comet trail and may have been an actual comet. But even so it would have looked like one to the magi. And if it were a comet it could have been one with an extremely long orbital period or even a passer by that kept on going back into deep space after it's trip through the solar system.

Anyway that is the conclusion I came to many years ago while studying the bible.

Am I right or wrong??? - You be the judge of that as I am convinced myself that I am right.



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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Parts 3 & 4
Astrology is not to tell you about what your life will be.




posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Either your spelling of the word "ashtare" is wrong or it is not in the King James Bible. I could not get a definition for this word.



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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The star of Bethlehem could not have been a comet, planet or real star because the object positioned itself over buildings. You can't pin point a location on the earth with a heavenly body. It had to be something that could hover within earth's atmosphere.

Check out this video clip in the following link. The object I believe to be the star of Bethlehem is the last flying object in the scene, but much brighter.

www.crackle.com...

If you don't want to view the video on crackle.com. I've posted the same scene below from Youtube.com. The posters of the video messed with the original audio. The above video is higher quality.




posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by lostinspace
 

Rick Larson's research led him to Jupiter and Regulus the brightest star in the constellation Leo that came so close to together at that time they looked like one bright object hovering in that one place.



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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Part 5 & 6

In part 6, he explains Jupiter and Regulus.

edit on 29-4-2011 by hawaii50th because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by hawaii50th
reply to post by happykat39
 


Either your spelling of the word "ashtare" is wrong or it is not in the King James Bible. I could not get a definition for this word.


The word star is in the bible. The Greek word it was translated from in the original Greek text is either astare or ashtare. It has been some time since I actually looked it up and I no longer have my old Strong's concordance. But the word ashtare is not in the English version of the bible, it is the word given for the word star as used in the nativity story that you will find in the Strong's concordance. And the definition is that of the word ashtare in the concordance.

I think you glossed over the part where I explained that in the first few lines of my post.


edit on 29-4-2011 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-4-2011 by happykat39 because: To add something



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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My keyboard can't type Greek letters so I will spell them out.

Alpha, Sigma, Tau, Epsilon, Rho, Alpha.

This is how the word "star" is rendered in Greek.

Astera



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by lostinspace
 

Thanks, I got it now I was able to translate it to the actual Greek.
The research for the star of Bethlehem being Jupiter and Regulus being in conjunction at the time. Below are a couple of other places that seem to agree on this event taking place at about 2 B.C. among other events.


Jupiter's Retrograde Motion Between Sept. 3 B.C. and May 2 B.C. there were three conjunctions (on Sept. 14, 3 B.C., Feb. 17, 2 B.C. and May 8, 2 B.C.) where Jupiter passed close to the star Regulus (the brightest star in the constellation Leo). This rare sequence of events would have looked very strange to those familiar with the night sky. Thompson found that the gas giant passed Regulus in an easterly motion before appearing to reverse direction, passing the star again in a westerly direction. This change in direction is known as retrograde motion. Due to the near-circular orbits of Earth and Jupiter, as Earth has a faster orbital period than Jupiter, from our point of view we will appear to "overtake" the gas giant. The motion of Jupiter will therefore appear to change direction for several weeks before changing direction again continuing its easterly drift.
news.discovery.com...
www.math.nus.edu.sg...



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 11:56 PM
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The Star of Bethlehem was an UFO...
...take no offenses Jesus lovers... For I love him too



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 12:28 AM
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I liked this video series, makes you think...




posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 02:29 AM
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Originally posted by lostinspace
My keyboard can't type Greek letters so I will spell them out.

Alpha, Sigma, Tau, Epsilon, Rho, Alpha.

This is how the word "star" is rendered in Greek.

Astera


But the Greek word the English word star in the bible was translated from is the Greek word meaning strew, not the Greek word for star. This would be very clear if you were to look up the word star as used in the nativity story in the Strong's concordance. It clearly states that the original Greek word the scribes for King James translated as star was not star in Greek but rather strew. In other words, the King James version of the bible is a mis-translation. And if you use the Strong's concordance you will see that the Greek word "strew" being translated as "star" is not the only place they "simplified" things by using a different English word from the original one in Greek.



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