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Isaiah 53

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posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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"Another explanation (of Ruth ii.14): -- He is speaking of king Messiah; `Come hither,' draw near to the throne; `and eat of the bread,' that is, the bread of the kingdom; `and dip thy morsel in the vinegar,' this refers to his chastisements, as it is said, `But he was wounded for our transgressions, bruised for our iniquities'"




Midrash Ruth Rabbah





posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by madnessinmysoul
reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


Bible codes are a statistical anomaly that works with any other text. Christians in general need to stop bringing them up as they are based on selection bias and post-hoc reasoning.


Wrong. The codes discovered and explicated by Ivan Panin have never been invalidated, and statistics have nothing to do with the codes he discovered, only simple arithmetic.

BTW, your assertion that Isaiah 53 is about Israel is laughable...I guess you did not believe his report.



posted on May, 5 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by madnessinmysoul
Bible codes are a statistical anomaly that works with any other text. Christians in general need to stop bringing them up as they are based on selection bias and post-hoc reasoning.

Your views are usually at odds with mine, but for once, this is something that I can agree with

edit on 5/5/11 by HardbeatAcolyte because: formatting fix



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 06:23 AM
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Originally posted by HardbeatAcolyte

Originally posted by madnessinmysoul
Bible codes are a statistical anomaly that works with any other text. Christians in general need to stop bringing them up as they are based on selection bias and post-hoc reasoning.

Your views are usually at odds with mine, but for once, this is something that I can agree with



Appears you have missed or ignored my reply on the previous page as well.


Irrelevant counter-argument. The skeptics claim that words or phrases can be found in any other "long work of literature such as Moby Dick".

Isaiah 53 has 12 verses.




edit on 6-5-2011 by NOTurTypical because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 09:40 AM
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Years ago, I read somewhere, and I wish I could remember the source, that IIRC, the Catholics and the Jews had a debate in the 17th century, maybe in Poland, about Isaiah 53. The Catholics took the position that it was about Christ, the Jews, of course, said otherwise. According to the account I read, the Catholics so nailed the Jews to the wall on this issue, that when the debate was over, the Jews officially pronounced the equivalent of excommunication on any Jew who read Isaiah 53. That is what I recall...



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical
Appears you have missed or ignored my reply on the previous page as well.


Irrelevant counter-argument. The skeptics claim that words or phrases can be found in any other "long work of literature such as Moby Dick".

Isaiah 53 has 12 verses.

Sorry, admittedly I hadn't read page 1, or watched the video you provided. That is interesting

edit on 8/5/11 by HardbeatAcolyte because: formatting fix



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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Originally posted by HardbeatAcolyte

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
Appears you have missed or ignored my reply on the previous page as well.


Irrelevant counter-argument. The skeptics claim that words or phrases can be found in any other "long work of literature such as Moby Dick".

Isaiah 53 has 12 verses.

Sorry, admittedly I hadn't read page 1, or watched the video you provided. That is interesting


Very interesting considering the topic of Isaiah 53, and the fact that it's the Christian message encoded into Isaiah from the Old Testament.



posted on May, 8 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by Lazarus Short
Years ago, I read somewhere, and I wish I could remember the source, that IIRC, the Catholics and the Jews had a debate in the 17th century, maybe in Poland, about Isaiah 53. The Catholics took the position that it was about Christ, the Jews, of course, said otherwise. According to the account I read, the Catholics so nailed the Jews to the wall on this issue, that when the debate was over, the Jews officially pronounced the equivalent of excommunication on any Jew who read Isaiah 53. That is what I recall...


They will not read it today in the synagogues, it's skipped over in the reading cycle.



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