Images That Changed The World - *Warning Graphic*

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posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 05:07 AM
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Here are a few images that I found that literally changed the world. Sometimes it takes images like these to put us firmly back on terra firma.

Looking at these, can anyone 'seriously' say we, as a hu-man collectiveness have changed all that much over the years?

See for yourself and let me know what you think.



This is the picture of a student/man going to work who has just had enough. The days leading up to this event thousands of protesters and innocent by standers were killed by their own government because the Chinese people wanted more rights.



ThÃ*ch Quảng Ðức was a Vietnamese Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon intersection on June 11, 1963. His act of self-immolation, which was repeated by others, was witnessed by David Halberstam,[i/]


This picture was shot by Eddie Adams who won the Pulitzer prize with it. The picture shows Nguyen Ngoc Loan, South Vietnam's national police chief executing a prisoner who was said to be a Viet Cong captain. Once again the public opinion was turned against the war.


The Triangle Shirtwaist Company always kept its doors locked to ensure that the young immigrant women stayed stooped over their machines and didn't steal anything. When a fire broke out on Saturday, March 25, 1911, on the eighth floor of the New York City factory, the locks sealed the workers' fate


The fireman has taken the time to remove his gloves before receiving this infant from the policeman.The fireman is just cradling this infant with the utmost compassion and caring.He doesn't know that she has already passed away.


The news that Richard Nixon was sending troops to Cambodia caused a chain of protests in the U.S. colleges. At Kent State the protest seemed more violent, some students even throwing rocks. In consequence, The Ohio National Guard was called to calm things down, but the events got out of hand and they started shooting


The powerful and controversial photograph provoked feelings of anger, particularly in the United States, in the immediate aftermath of the September 11 attacks. The photo ran only once in many American newspapers because they received critical and angry letters from readers who felt the photo was exploitative, voyeuristic, and disrespectful of the dead. This led to the media's self-censorship of the photograph, preferring instead to print photos of acts of heroism and sacrifice.


The prize-winning image: A vulture watches a starving child in southern Sudan, March 1, 1993.
Carter's winning photo shows a heart-breaking scene of a starving child collapsed on the ground, struggling to get to a food center during a famine in the Sudan in 1993. In the background, a vulture stalks the emaciated child.



In 1957 he began taking pictures with an endoscope, an instrument that can see inside a body cavity, but when Lennart Nilsson presented the rewards of his work to LIFE's editors several years later, they demanded that witnesses confirm that they were seeing what they thought they were seeing. Finally convinced, they published a cover story in 1965 that went on for 16 pages


pinguy.infogami.com...
edit on 27-4-2011 by franspeakfree because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-4-2011 by franspeakfree because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 05:43 AM
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Flags... but no comments yet...

Guess its hard to put words to these pictures, since they speak for them selves...
Nice addition to ATS...



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:02 AM
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No, those images did nothing to change the world.

Raising awareness did not change the world, it merely altered the awareness of some individuals.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:04 AM
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For better or worse, actual photos of all tragedies need to be shown to some degree. The censorship of war photos has estranged the public from the real horrors of war. If we were to see our dead service 'boys' and 'girls', and all collateral damage, we might be a little more irate and demand that we defend ourselves instead of fighting wars for profit.

Graphic war photos are censored so we won't protest the status quo. Great post.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:07 AM
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fran as always
u take my breath away.
great thread that everybody
should look at.
S&F



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:19 AM
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Hello, Wonderful thread! It is the same one I started in June of 2009.........


www.abovetopsecret.com...


Thanks,

pax



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by lostviking
 





For better or worse, actual photos of all tragedies need to be shown to some degree. The censorship of war photos has estranged the public from the real horrors of war. If we were to see our dead service 'boys' and 'girls', and all collateral damage, we might be a little more irate and demand that we defend ourselves instead of fighting wars for profit. Graphic war photos are censored so we won't protest the status quo. Great post.


True words are spoken, nice post. people know sh&t, only the families of the fallen know, lest we forget

Wal



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by paxnatus
Hello, Wonderful thread! It is the same one I started in June of 2009.........


www.abovetopsecret.com...


Thanks,

pax


Isn't that a coincidence, it just goes to show great minds think alike, your not an Aries are you per chance.

Peace.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


It is a coincidence. No, but close. I'm a Taurus. and you?



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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The African child with the vulture does my head in. I can only glance quickly, it just upsets me so much...

Ages ago, I read that the photographer who took that picture committed suicide. Apparently he/she never got over the horrific nature of the shot.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by StereoInferno
 


i can imagine him/her taking the shot as fast as possible, still taking time, when he/she had a shot that was good he/she picked the child up and began running like hell to get help in the camp that was near.

arriving and the kid dieing or just died.
doctors telling him/her, the kid almost made it, just a few seconds earlier and the child would have certainly made it.

.........

taking the picture did not kill him, the thought what he/she could do after it. did.
edit on 27-4-2011 by Guilp because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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It's definitely good to see such photos. As much as we may not want to see them - these things are as much a part of history as the photos of success and heroism.




No, those images did nothing to change the world.

Raising awareness did not change the world, it merely altered the awareness of some individuals.


I can definitely see what your saying. However, some individuals become many individuals who each choose whether or not to contribute to changing the world in which we live - in their own way.
Individually, we may not be able to make an immediate significant change. But if an honest hard hitting image changes an attitude positively (even in an insignificant way) then its a good thing.
For instance, the image of the starving child hasn't led me to contribute financially to a charity that can directly help. (sorry) But it did immediately make me think of the amount of food I waste on a daily basis, and the amount of homeless people locally that are probably pretty hungry themselves. So an appreciation for what I have has been reinforced.

It's not changed the world. But small contributions or changes down to huge lifechanging contributions are all part of it. I think these kinds of photos keep us in touch with reality - that life isn't all hunky dory. When we aren't able to see these things its easy to forget what goes on elsewhere.

It can also give us hope. When/if any of us who are used to a relatively problem free life suffer because of a tragedy, we've witnessed through these types of images that there is a heart to humanity.

In my opinion, its not all about the measurable changes but the small changes too. Not even all about changes, but support and empathy.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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S+F for you its a great addition to this website I felt like I should have seen these before which some I have seen.
Thanks for the lookie...



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Guilp
 


I'll see if I can find a link to the photographer who took the photo and later killed himself. As I recall, he didn't rescue the child. The child died in the dirt.

www.snopes.com...

The photographer waited for 20 minutes to try to capture an image of the vulture spreading it's wings over the child. Finally he took the image you see in the OP, then he sat under a tree and smoked a cigarette. Afterwards he left. He had no idea what happened to the child. He just left her there.

edit on 27-4-2011 by kyred because: Found a link



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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There are no words for this thread the pictures say it all.

Very well done. S+F



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 08:04 PM
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I have seen many of these photos before but everytime I see them they are still just as powerful in what they portray as the first time i saw them. Great thread fran! Definitely a star and flag for you.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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Actually the china picture did change the world. It showed the courage of a man standing against tyranny and to my recollection that picture brought an awareness of the incidente in Tienammen square to the forefront, making countrys demand changes in China for human rights.

That picture also is an example to anyone who says one person can't do anything. All you need is one person to stand up for what is right then you may have 2. Then 3 and 4 and so on.

That is one of the most powerful images that's ever been captured in my opinion. The rest are good but a more a matter of cruelty and suffering more than hope. That's why I like the first one so much.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by kyred
 


Thanks for the background info - That picture was one of the most disturbing I've ever seen. I feel physically ill.



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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Beautiful, disturbing, courageous, disgusting, heartbreaking... thank you for the thread. S&F for you!



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by kyred
reply to post by Guilp
 


I'll see if I can find a link to the photographer who took the photo and later killed himself. As I recall, he didn't rescue the child. The child died in the dirt.

www.snopes.com...

The photographer waited for 20 minutes to try to capture an image of the vulture spreading it's wings over the child. Finally he took the image you see in the OP, then he sat under a tree and smoked a cigarette. Afterwards he left. He had no idea what happened to the child. He just left her there.

edit on 27-4-2011 by kyred because: Found a link


And as he took the picture the wings of Death stretched out over the photographer. I can only hope there is a hell and he is not enjoying himself there.





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