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Ki Energy/Shaolin Monks

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posted on Mar, 25 2003 @ 06:18 PM
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Ki Energy
Ki energy is the life force that animates all living things. Ki energy cultivated and controlled within oneself. Ki can be directed externally for the purpose of self defense and attack as in the marital arts; Ki can be directed internally for the purpose of health and longevity, healing and stress reduction, productivity and creativity, and inner power and spiritual growth as in Sunin Do. Four qualities of Ki energy circulate throughout the body system: negative, neutral, positive and pure. Good health and vitality depend on the predominance of positive Ki energy - the unrestricted flow of Ki en the body. This vital life force has the power to alleviate or reduce the impact of stress and trauma that occur to the entire system.

Description The terms ch'i and ki (as related, for example, to martial arts) are indistinguishable. Although it has a multitude of meanings, ki or ch'i has been described as the breath, spirit or nature of things. In Taoism, ch'i is the life force, the vital or primordial energy which, as cosmic spirit, diffuses all creation and gives it life. Every individual has a reservoir of this energy from birth, located in the physical sense at the navel, the so-called "ocean of breath" where exercises aimed at prolonging life are centred, the ch'i-hai. Normal living depletes this store of energy and leads to sickness and death. Different techniques, for example those of Taoist alchemy, concentrate on preserving, nurturing and replenishing ch'i, whether in the physical, mental or spiritual sense; and lead to health, longevity or immortality at the appropriate level. In the physical sense, exercises concentrating on control of breath may lead to re-establishment of emotional well-being and balance within the neurohormonal system.

Ki energy is both personal and impersonal, concrete and universal. Transcending time and space, it is the basic creative energy or force in life. As a psychophysical energy important in the martial arts, ki energy is developed by breathing exercises and implemented by concentration of the will. Ki is twofold - the unity of the individual-universe and the free and spontaneous expression of breath-power. The former, inheriting the ideas of ancient Chinese thinkers, is realized through unifying ki, mind and body in, for example, aikido training. It acts as defence against physical attack and may be used at a distance. The kiai shout focuses all the bodily and spiritual energy into one sound, unifying the proponent's powers and disconcerting the opponent.

Harmony of ki, or ai-ki, is manifest when mind and body are unified, its subtle working is the maternal source that affects changes in breath. As delicate changes in breath power occur spontaneously, proper technique flows freely.
Awareness of delicate changes may show fierce and potent or slow and stolid movements of ki in the void, leading to discernment of the degree of concentration or unification of mind and body. Ki can be taken to mean mind, spirit or heart, and thus to have ki out of order in some way means a diminished state of consciousness. This may be insanity, nervousness, depression; it may be an emotional condition (quick tempered, shy). It is the ki and not the individual that is referred to in these cases.

Refs Book of Ki: co-ordinating mind and body in daily life (Koichi, Tohei); Ki: a practical guide for Westerners (Reed, William); Ch'i: a neo-Taoist approach to life (Siu, R G H, 1974); The Root of Chinese Chi Kung (Yang, Jwing-Ming, 1988).


Reiki
Reiki is a powerful system of healing that utilizes specific techniques for restoring and balancing the natural life force energy within the body. It is a holistic, natural, hands on energy healing system that touches individuals on all levels; Mind, Body & Spirit. Reiki (pronounced Ray-Key) is a Japanese word representing Universal Life Energy, the energy that is all around us. It is derived from rei meaning "transcendental spirit" or "universal" and ki meaning "vital life force energy".




posted on Mar, 25 2003 @ 06:23 PM
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I remember a documentry on Discovery about Shaolin Monks. One of the concentrated his Ki Energy and shoved his hands through some sort of contraption that was made of two huge iron cylinders, supposedly each weighed 300lbs yet his arms were impervious and he would roll them back and forth and he bones weren't crushed... They said his body temp rose though.

See if I can find a link fer it.



posted on Mar, 25 2003 @ 06:25 PM
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The Founders
For over fifteen hundred years the Shaolin Monks from China's Henan Province have applied the discipline of martial arts as a unique manifestation of their religion. The name Shaolin has become synonymous with the finest and most extraordinary feats of discipline, strength and courage; and with the growth in popularity of modern Kung Fu, the reputation of the Shaolin Monks has become established throughout the world.

The Shaolin Warriors

In the early years immediately following the founding of the Shaolin Temple in 495 AD, the first Soldier Monks created a set of eighteen different fighting actions - the original Kung Fu - which utilised all parts of their bodies. These were combined with the use of various weapons made from simple farming tools and were initially a means of providing daily exercise and as a form of meditation. Later they were used as a means of self defence.



posted on Mar, 25 2003 @ 06:27 PM
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History of Shaolin
Kung-Fu


The Shaolin order dates to about 540 A.D., when an Indian Buddhist priest named Bodidharma (Tamo in Chineses) traveled to China to see the Emporer. At that time, the Emperor had ordered the local Buddhist monks to translate Buddhist texts from sanskrit to Chinese. His intent was to allow the general populace the ability to practice this religion.

This was a noble project, but while the Emperor believed this to be his path to Nirvana, Tamo disagreed. Tamo's view on Buddhism was that you could not achieve your goal just through good actions performed by others in your name. At this point the Emperor and Tamo parted ways and Tamo traveled to the near by Buddhist temple to meet with the monks who were translating the Buddhist texts.

The temple had been built years before in the remains of a forest that had been cleared. At the time of the building of the temple, the emperor's gardeners had also planted new trees. Thus the temple was named "young (or new) forest," (Shaolin in Mandarin, Sil Lum in Cantonese).

When Tamo joined the monks, he observed that they were not in good physical condition. Most of their routine paralleled that of the Irish monks of the Middle Ages, who spent hours each day hunched over tables where they transcribed handwritten texts. Consequently, the Shaolin monks lacked the physical and mental stamina needed to perform even the most basic of Buddhist meditation practices. Tamo countered this weakness by teaching them moving exercises, designed to both enhanced ch'i flow and build strength. These sets, modified from Indian yogas (mainly hatha, and raja) were based on the movements of the 18 main animals in Indo-Chinese iconography (e.g., tiger, deer, leopard, cobra, snake, dragon, etc.), were the beginnings of Shaolin Gung Fu.

It is hard to say just when the exercises became "martial arts." The Shaolin temple was in a secluded area where bandits would have traveled and wild animals were an occasional problem, so the martial side of the temple probably started out to fulfill self-defense needs. After a while, these movements were codified into a system of self-defense. The Shaolin practitioner is never an attacker, nor does he or she dispatch the most devastating defenses in any situation. Rather, the study of Gung Fu leads to a better understanding of violence, and consequently how to avoid conflict. Failing that, a Buddhist who refuses to accept an offering of violence (ie, and attack) merely returns it to the sender. Initially, the Gung Fu expert may choose to parry an attack, but if an assailant is both skilled and determined to cause harm, a more definitive and concluding solution may be required, from a joint-lock hold to a knockout, to death. The more sophisticated and violent an assault, the more devastating the return of the attack to the attacker. Buddhists are not, therefore, hurting anyone; they merely refuse delivery of intended harm.



posted on Mar, 26 2003 @ 05:14 AM
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What is your point in posting this info?



posted on Mar, 27 2003 @ 11:34 AM
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I think his point is to provide information on the shaolin monks, that should be obvious.

XAOS



posted on May, 1 2003 @ 04:41 AM
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Chi, Ki. It's also called prana in Sanskrit and is linked to kundalini.
Roman Christians would probably say that it's the devils work. LOL.


ONE



posted on May, 1 2003 @ 08:59 PM
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It's not "Ki" or "Chi" energy. While I feel that energy exists, it's more of a "feeling" then a force.

You know there is a real good Shaolin Kung Fu center in New York City if you want to learn their "Mysteries".

Wanna know how they punch through crap like that?

Well first off there are 3 types of punch, the one being most sought after is the pericing one that can penetrate the body and rupture the organs.

How is this accomplished? By stretching 1000s of times a day, by punching 1000s of times a day, and excersising like crazy.

In fact I read of one master who practices each moring by hitting an Iron block 10000 times before he does ANYTHING else.

Now THAT is how they can do the stuff they do...constant, endless repetition.

Ask a boxer they'll tell you the more you punch the more fluid, the more smooth and strait and more control over the punch you have.

Same with kicking...any martial skill

It's not like they sit there and go "huuuuummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm" and build up some energy and then "BLASTO!" and a shockwave blows over a wall.

They punch ten thousand times a day and consequently they can punch your head off.

Remember Bruce Lee's 1inch punch.

It's all about the motion and leverage, and nothing to do with strength.

Punching continously gives you that control.



posted on May, 4 2003 @ 09:30 AM
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wow 10, 000 punches. at two punches a second that would equal out to about 83 minutes of punching. and to think that they will never use it.

XAOS



posted on May, 4 2003 @ 11:22 AM
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The Ki or Chi energy I believe is their drive, and they are able to push themself to their limits. Just like how an athlete claims to be in the "zone" and can push his/herself harder. Training has a lot to do with it but also their belief system would effect them I believe. They say practice makes perfect, but I think you gotta have heart or whatever you wish to call it to go beyond the beyond. Either way I respect the monks and find them interesting.

This also reminds me of some skinny guy I saw on tv a while back... He does some sort of meditation, he sat in a meat freezer for a few hours in just a pair of shorts and maintainted his body tempature actually brought it above 98.6 although he sat in one spot, he also swam under some ice in just a pair of shorts and nearly passed out, but he didn't get hypothermia. I wish I could remember his name, I doubt it was a hoax but you never know perhaps he had his little trick? I saw on Discovery Travel an indian man, who could stay under water for extreme periods of time by just cupping oxygen in his hand and bring it down to him neat trick.



posted on May, 6 2003 @ 11:19 PM
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Interested posters may find it more fruitful to use the standard spelling "Qi" when they search.
It's a daily word in China found in connection with traditional medicine, acupuncture, magic tea and similar peasant quackery.



posted on May, 7 2003 @ 12:42 AM
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I read up on yogi's in india. supposedly some of them can survive without eating or drinking for extended amounts of time. They can shut their body down except for the completely vital organs.



posted on May, 7 2003 @ 12:44 AM
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A lot of people dont believe in stuff like this, but I definetly do. I do marshall arts and I am begining to learn the basics of how to use chi. Very fascinating.



posted on Oct, 2 2005 @ 06:38 PM
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Prana is the hindoe-ish equivelant of the japanese Chi and chinese QI. different names for the same thing.

there are Yogi's that practice Siddhi techniques, which also include the non-eating and non-sleeping for long periods of time. some of them have done without for 50-60 years.

i've bought a book about Prana: living on light. basically tells you about how to feed on energy and never eat physical foods again. it's written by Jasmuheen


cjf

posted on Oct, 2 2005 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by omega1
A lot of people dont believe in stuff like this, but I definetly do. I do marshall arts and I am begining to learn the basics of how to use chi. Very fascinating.


A very interesting topic to explore.

You will find a plethora of uses and endless ‘life’ lessons if you can find a good knowledgeable traditional ‘Chinese’ martial arts instructor in your area.

It is odd though, when you first begin learning control and the manipulation ‘energies’ (normally after a few years of training) everyone generally tends, initially, to get a splitting headache; this generally lasts on-and -off until one has spent the necessary time and effort in exercising both the mind and body in this aspect.

.



posted on Oct, 2 2005 @ 10:35 PM
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From your post.
It is odd though, when you first begin learning control and the manipulation ‘energies’ (normally after a few years of training) everyone generally tends, initially, to get a splitting headache; this generally lasts on-and -off until one has spent the necessary time and effort in exercising both the mind and body in this aspect.



I dont know what you are studying, but neither my master,myself, my clan members, or my students have ever complained about headaches.
It is an understanding. An effortless effort. A natural part of your existance.
If anything it should keep you from having headaches. I(just my opinion) would "raise an eyebrow" to what you are being taught.
Remember that many Asians have a dislike for "roundeyes" and teach them wrong.
Dont get me wrong. I dont know who you are studying under, so I can't say anything bad about him. It just seems to me that something is not right.


[edit on 2-10-2005 by only onus]


cjf

posted on Oct, 3 2005 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by only onus
I dont know what you are studying, but neither my master,myself, my clan members, or my students have ever complained about headaches.
It is an understanding. An effortless effort. A natural part of your existance.
If anything it should keep you from having headaches.


Only when persons are initially attempting to gain control while using in combined ‘combat’ techniques. Although some 'movements' loosely use Qi(Chi) there is an exponential progression to maximize focus.

There is also a difference between traditional meditative preparations and styles vs. incorporation into ‘defensive and offensive’ technique.

I’ll try and to give a simple example:

Given Bagwa and Qigong have an enormous meditative value, physical training as well as superior breathing techniques and are (if you will) 'Arts' in and of thier own right.

Transferring the training to meld practically with ‘offensive and defensive’ techniques is not so easily accomplished. Some individuals when first fully attempting to expand/integrate Qigong into advanced parallel technique hyperventilate or even nearly ‘pass out’ initially.

Congruently there is a difference from moving from meditative Qi(Chi) exercises to incorporation in to ‘offensive and defensive’ techniques vs. that of moving into e.g. Qi(Chi) healing.

Basically speaking, fusing the mind, body and properly focusing Qi(Chi) inside ‘defensive and offensive’ techniques takes effort, experience and practice. Quickly moving the ‘focal energies’ properly and willfully to the body extremities have similar effects when first integrating. The initial result is a ‘headache’ for many when first learning. It is a transition.

This is how I have attempted to explain it verbally to persons that have General understanding; but it is hard to convey without demonstrative example.


Originally posted by only onus
Dont get me wrong. I dont know who you are studying under, so I can't say anything bad about him. It just seems to me that something is not right.


I began as a child learning Tae Kwon Do, Aikido, Judo and Jujitsu from a Vietnamese Grand Master (8th dan). Later through some exposure via open expositions as a teenager, I was exposed to traditional Chinese Martial arts via Chung Moo Doe (Chong Su Nim Kim style) and became a student until I went to college. In college the only traditional Chinese ‘school’ I could find near was an Oom Yung Doe (also Grandmaster Kim style) school with a few structural differences. I have been studying now for a number of years under an independent traditional Chinese arts instructor (7th dan Grandmaster).

You are correct about the Chinese views concerning Americans (‘white devils’ or ‘western devils’). The Grandmaster does not have and ‘open school’; rather only instructs 10th section and on and is very traditional beyond the above mentioned schools standards.

Our ‘school’ primarily consists of seasoned students desiring to maintain their knowledge base and skills while advancing according to traditional rules. Advancement is very slow after 2nd dan anyway combined with a tremendous amount notes and memory work it can be very time consuming; but it is extremely rewarding.

.



posted on Oct, 3 2005 @ 11:55 AM
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I do belive they called it Qi-Gong


cjf

posted on Oct, 3 2005 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by gamerman
I do belive they called it Qi-Gong


Don't be so quick to try and 'correct' me, ask these people...

QIGONG ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

or this guy...

By Roger Jahnke, OMD
Director, Institute of Integral Qigong and Tai Chi
Author, The Healer Within and Healing Promise of Qi
(Link)
(from here)

But if you really want to know, it does not matter how you spell it, it is spelled as with a hyphen, compunded or single 'words' in varius English texts.....

...because this...."氣功"...is the real friggin' script representation smart guy.

.



posted on Oct, 3 2005 @ 01:37 PM
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Hey , whats up with you being so rude ? I just said this because everytime iv seen it been written it has a Q before the I and the Qi-gong is the type of exersice the Monks use to achive more self controll and get the chakra controlled etc....

Iv read much about it and even lived a year in China with the Shaolin monks , so please don`t try to "out-smart" me with your very mature and correct resposn




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