It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Patriotic twist made to private school voucher bill

page: 1
8

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 04:06 PM
link   

Patriotic twist made to private school voucher bill


www.wndu.com

The school voucher bill has now passed both houses of the Indiana General Assembly

“If you’re going to take a voucher, if the school is going to take a voucher, they need to be pro-American,” said Senator Yoder.

An amendment added in the senate requires that private schools display a United States flag in every classroom, and that students be provided with at least one daily opportunity to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

“You’ll have to have certain documents that are accessible
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 04:06 PM
link   
I'm all for honestly teaching American History and civics and believe that the current theme in public schools, with respect to history, current affairs and literature in many cases has a bias that has an anti-American tint. Not actually anti-American, but with a shade of bias towards it. Essentially a PC flavor to general school instruction.

That being said, this is jingoistic nonsense. It is a political statement and does nothing to ensure that these private schools are in fact "patriot".

To the contrary, forcing schools to do these things, leaves individual teachers and school administrators the opportunity to show contempt for them, something some of them will certainly do and potentially would not have done absent this heavy handed nonsense from the state.

Were this to be considered a priority of the government, it would have been best to bring this to referandum and let the people decide.

They just had one of these politicans who voted for this bill on Fox News. Stuart Varney asked him what the motto of the United States was. He punted on the question. Varney then offered him two choices:

"In God We Trust" and "E pluribus unum" He did not know the answer. What a tool.

www.wndu.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 04:13 PM
link   
ok i am a hoosier and i have my problems with this

no money from the public money should be going to any private schools.

and i do agree with the sentiment of the education in america is everything but pro american.

history should be taught as it is history theres should be no bias just the who what where and when

and thats its.

private schools derive their incomes from that tutiton cost and that means people who are not sending their own children there should not be paying for someone who is.

if they start receiving money from the public that opens a whole other can of worms meaning they will be able to tell them what they can or cant teach and how to teach it.

there is a reason that private schools produce smarter students than public schools do and thats due to the non interference of the state.

thats my take.
edit on 25-4-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 04:50 PM
link   


means people who are not sending their own children there should not be paying for someone who is.
So, why not apply that across the board? Basically tie the money to the student, not the district. Let the parents decide where to send the students. Introduce a little competition into education. Deadwood teachers would have to get off their a$$es and do something. Otherwise that school closes for lack of attendance. Schools wanting to stay open would have to up their game and students everywhere win.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 05:59 PM
link   
Voucher programs are garbage. Send your kids to a public school, OR send your kids to a private school on your own dime. Making the public reimburse private schools is ridiculous. This republican Carlin Yoder just ups the insanity with this "pro-American" rhetoric. Maybe Indiana families should be cross-checked against the terrorist watch list like 9/11 first responders.


The debate over whether Indiana should spend public tax dollars on private schools—is over.

The school voucher bill has now passed both houses of the Indiana General Assembly and could be on its way to the governor’s desk.

On Thursday, the Indiana State Senate approved the measure by a vote of 28 to 22. Nine Republicans joined all 13 Democrats in voting against the bill. The approval came after an amendment designed to ensure that only pro-American private schools were eligible to receive state money.


The Republicans control both house and senate in Indiana and they approved this. All the dems voted against it. All voucher programs do is allow a for-profit corporation come between the tax payers and funding public education. what makes this bill worse is it now wants to use vouchers for private schools but only those that meet these republicans "pro-American" agenda, whatever the h*** that is.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 06:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by sonofliberty1776



means people who are not sending their own children there should not be paying for someone who is.
So, why not apply that across the board? Basically tie the money to the student, not the district. Let the parents decide where to send the students. Introduce a little competition into education. Deadwood teachers would have to get off their a$$es and do something. Otherwise that school closes for lack of attendance. Schools wanting to stay open would have to up their game and students everywhere win.


Now, don't go bringing logic and "fairness" into the equation.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 06:36 PM
link   
I feel this will lead to the re-admittance of the pledge of allegiance into the class room in areas that have removed it and I find it disturbing as oath or pledge is a contract and children are not able to enter into contract. This is a way of conditioning children to accept that contract as adults so they don't read the fine print



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 06:45 PM
link   
i pledge alliegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the REPUBLIC for which it stands one nation under god, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

nothing wrong with teaching kids that this country is a republic and not a democracy

and that republic for which we were founded as stands as one united voice

under the eyes of a god from which all those rights in the constitution deems every man woman and child in america has and that they can not be abridged.

and to teach our children that there is liberty meaning freedom and justice no person is above the law.

personally i see nothing wrong with the pledge.

but thats just me


edit on 25-4-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 07:04 PM
link   
reply to post by sonofliberty1776
 


This has allrdy been tried it was called segregation here in the south.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 07:04 PM
link   
reply to post by neo96
 


There is something wrong with forcing children to pledge allegiance to ANYTHING before they're old enough to make their own decisions.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 07:18 PM
link   
reply to post by PapillonSkeletons
 


dunno where you get that they are forced alot of kids where i went to school always had the options to sit down and abstain,



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 08:37 PM
link   
As school districts try to keep up with fewer and fewer dollars to keep going, I as a taxpayer worry that vouchers will somehow end up costing me more down the road....I can hear a cry for a new millage already :shk:

As an American, I have no problem with the American flag being displayed in private school settings, or in the Pledge of Allegiance being recited.
I went to private school for 12 years.
Said the Pledge as required.
Always had classroom flags.
When did that change......it should not have.

I don't want to go all crazy nationalistic here, but what is wrong with pride in Country???



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 09:36 PM
link   
reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


I too went to a multiple of private schools and the fag was present. The pledge of allegiance was recited and while in England we sang "God Save the Queen" as well as taking the pledge. There was no choice involved. You stood and recited. If a child were to refuse today they would be publicly scolded,removed, and reported. the parents then are placed on watch sheets as being dissidents at best and terrorist at worst. I believe that it is wrong to condition the children to accept something that most of them can't spell much less understand what it is they are doing and all the implications resulting there of.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 10:05 PM
link   
Here in Texas, at least for a while, not sure if it still stands, parents who chose to send their kids to private school, but couldn't afford it, got a full free ride from the state. It did not, in fact, cause the public schools to get better. They pretty much stayed the same. As far as I could tell, as a kid going to school, not a whole hell of a lot changed at all except we lost a few classmates to the private schools. Indiana could be different, but mostly I'm pretty sure people are people wherever they are, and it isn't gonna help anybody but the kids who get to escape from public school because of the vouchers. Of course, Texas's schools are mostly funded by local taxes instead of any cash coming in from the state or federal level, and I do not know how Indiana does it. Whereas, I'm reasonably sure that the money for private school tuition assistance came from the state. So yeah, what didn't screw us over too much here may totally bone Indiana.

As far as the pledge and the flag and stuff... Again, some law passed in Texas while I was in high school, which mandated that every morning we had to say the US pledge of allegiance and the Texas pledge of allegiance, as well as hold a moment of silence so whoever wanted to pray could pray. Most of the teachers were gung ho about it, but the students... it was amazing how many "spontaneous" coughing fits and bouts of hiccups we had during the pledges and moments of silence, and how many people said "under [Satan, Buddha, Dog, Superman, Yo Momma, etc.]". Yeah, they can try. Oh, they can try... but school kids are a lot less docile than legislators like to think.

That isn't to say this crap isn't a bit outrageous, because it is on many, many levels. That isn't to say that the slow erosion of sanity in this country, attempted indoctrination of schoolchildren, and other tomfoolery isn't a problem, because it is.

I'm just sayin, backlash is nice sometimes when they've got your hands tied.



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 02:02 PM
link   
reply to post by neo96
 


Throughout my whole elementary years, and up to 9/11, I was required to stand and pledge allegiance. The one time I didn't do so, I was sent to the Principal's office.

You also have to look at the language being used. If you say, "Class, stand for the pledge", for a child who is just starting to learn the nuances of our language (as most kids are while in this social environment), that is an order, not a request they can back out of.



new topics

top topics



 
8

log in

join