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What a Pole Shift looks like

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posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by Segador
 


As Clif High states, (if he is correct and I think he is) the center of the Earth Is Not liquid iron. First off, liquid iron will not produce a electro magnetic field. Instead, it is a Plasma Core. What the Sun puts off is energy, the plasma receives this energy and transmutes it into physical matter...it's kinda like E=MC2, only you have M on one side and the other two on the other side. Basically when you (do something) with Energy and the speed of light squared you end up with Mass. Perhaps a Math whiz can give me the accurate algebraic equation.
Ok so in short...two of the simplest elements is Oxygen and Hydrogen...when created these combine to create water....so yes, water is created out of air.




posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


Well, according to Newton's formulas, the farther away we get from the centre of mass of an object the lower the gravity becomes, so while the volume and mass increase that doesn't mean that the gravity does.

I will try some calculations.


Edit: after some calculations it looks like a change in the Earth's (or any other body) radius would create a proportional change in the gravity. If the Earth had half it's radius but the same density the gravity would be half of what is now; if the Earth's radius would grow 10% then the gravity would be 10% stronger.

I think that the most sensitive weighing scales would be enough to detect a change in the Earth's size.
edit on 25/4/2011 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Thanks... However you managed to do it!


I'd better start exercising, just in case...



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


From your Newtonian argument then gravity would be less on Jupiter than it is on the Moon.
I don't think Newton was talking about gravity in just that sort a way



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by redgreen
 


How did you reach that conclusion?



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 

not trying to be argumentative...at least in a mean way.
Please correct me anywhere. it won't hurt my feelings.
Jupiter is I believe the largest planet in the Solar system....since it's the largest then it should have the least amount of gravity, and vice a versa for the Moon or any other smaller planetoid. Of course Jupiter has a greater amount of gravity.
If you really want to screw up your day, do a search: June, 1957 Mechanix illustrated, antigravity



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by redgreen
 


Did you read the second part of my post, where I posted the results of my calculations?

For the same density, a bigger planet means a bigger gravity, that's why I don't understand why you say that according to this Jupiter should have a smaller gravity.



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