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Windows coders write buggy code - ON PURPOSE.

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posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 07:28 AM
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Originally posted by autowrench
I do not trust any closed source software. Microsoft has an agenda, and that is to make you mad at the OS you have now, so you will buy the "new improved" one that comes out in a few years. I remember ME. How buggy was that OS? Then came XP, and I must admit XP runs pretty good, in fact a lot of my customers (I run a small PC repair shop) ask me to install XP instead of Windows 7, which everyone seems to hate in this neck of the woods. I started using Linux because I got tired of all of the updates every other day, the constant crashes, fatal blue screens, and the constant threat of viruses and malware. I have a custom box running PC Linux Gnome. It is fast and stable, and I can do anything a Windows PC can do except perhaps play games, but them, computers were not meant to play games on all the time, were they?


Do you check the source code, or just compile and install? I find most people raving about how open source is most secure--and even I, a programmer--don't look at the source code before running make or installing a program binary.
edit on 24-4-2011 by 547000 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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reply to post by 547000
 


One of my favorite things about OSS is downloading the source code, reading it - compiling it, then going back and editing the source code and recompiling to add in extra features.

(This is especially fun with online multiplayer games..)



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by DaWhiz
 


I never said that things LIKE this never happened. The scale of it is enormously different however...were talking about Windows, which is something just about everyone uses (well not mac owners, but still they are the minority). Having a backdoor into Windows means that anyone with info on the backdoor could hack into just about any informational database in existence. Thats a HUGE risk if the U.S. government did that....it just seems incredibly unlikely to me.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by mbkennel

Microsoft will patch unintentional bugs and bugs which It Has Come To Their Attention Of A Vulnerability. In other words, when a bug appears to be exploited by a foreign intelligence service or criminal activity, the intelligence services will inform the software makers, in this case Microsoft.



I see what you are saying...they keep constantly changing the bugs. The only problem is that once a foreign intelligence service finds the hole its already too late, they've got the info they want. I can see this happening just as a matter of the evolution of an operating program, but its hard for me to accept that holes are placed intentionally. That would open up every windows user in America, or in other words 99% of us! (yeah I made that statistic up...I have no Idea how many Mac users vs Windows users there are, but I don't imagine I'm too far off)
Even if they patch the hole, and cut open a new one every time they are compromised....they have still been compromised. And thats assuming they even find out they have been compromised....I'm sure a foreign nation can find a hole and do so quite stealthily. It just seem far too large of a risk to me....or course the Government does risky and stupid things all the time, so who knows?



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by FreedomCommander
Is there any way to rewrite the code so that I have no one spying on me?


Well there are other ways, there's several sites with lots of info on the hidden Microsoft backdoor services you SHOULD switch off or hack disable to block these potential security problems and block the identified ports on your firewalls. The problem is, I can't remember the sites name, try google maybe, but you shouldn't be worried unless you just want to annoy them for fun, because if you are into stuff worth securing, you *SHOULDN'T* be using Windows anyway. Windows is not secure.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by ravenflt

Originally posted by FreedomCommander
Is there any way to rewrite the code so that I have no one spying on me?


Well there are other ways, there's several sites with lots of info on the hidden Microsoft backdoor services you SHOULD switch off or hack disable to block these potential security problems and block the identified ports on your firewalls. The problem is, I can't remember the sites name, try google maybe, but you shouldn't be worried unless you just want to annoy them for fun, because if you are into stuff worth securing, you *SHOULDN'T* be using Windows anyway. Windows is not secure.


Or, you could just get a cheap firewall ($100.00 or so) and block all ports except port 80 (Internet). Your system will have all the protection it can get, unless you spend more on the firewall.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by bobdole210
thats what coders do to keep there jobs, why would you want to write a code thats gonna last forever that would put you out of a job so you write buggy code so that eventually you'll have to write new code to replace it
i had to explain this to a friend recently there just doing there jobs
edit on 23-4-2011 by bobdole210 because: forgot a line


An application (code) can not last forever! At some point the user wants more or better performance. Hence "new code".

I've been a software engineer for nearly 40 years, and, I, and everyone else I know in the industry, would never write "buggy" code. There are several reasons for this; not the least of which is ... "buggy" code prolly won't compile. And even if it does, it will produce exceptions that have to be dealt with before release.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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edit on 24-4-2011 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by fleabit
So much guessing and just plain ignorant posts.

Programmers interact with Windows code constantly, when creating their own software. Do you really think this would be invisible to everyone? If there is one thing that is OBVIOUSLY transparent, it's WINDOWS CODE.


Oh really?


Why do you think there are so many malware / viruses that take advantage of even a single BYTE of space to infect a computer? And yet no one has found this CIA code that somehow "spies" on us.


How do you know this CIA code (it would probably be NSA, anyway) isn't exactly the same thing?

If one were a powerful national intelligence agency and wanted to do this, how would you do it? You'd do it in exactly the way described by the original poster: very obscure specially crafted bugs.

The actual "spy code" would only be loaded on machines were are a target of an active investigation, of course---because the intelligence agencies obviously want to minimize their "footprint". So, unless you were an active target, your computer wouldn't have any spy code on it.

They could do a whole lot with Windows Update. Here's how it would work: Microsoft would be appropriately "incentivized" (to used the bureacraticspeak) to route the updates of certain targets to special servers (this is invisible at the user level, the routing happens inside Microsoft's data centers and to most everybody it looks like load balancing).

These servers would not be under the full control of Microsoft, but the intelligence community. Almost all of it replicates standard Windows Update servers. Occasionally a patch is just a little bit different (thought to all user-visible indications, it's exactly the same). The contents of those patches are classified and hence not available to Microsoft employees (except for those working for the NSA, and there are probably a few).

The intentional bugs are used for those cases where the Windows Update method doesn't work. Remember also that the NSA is tasked with protecting U.S. computers from hostile intelligence penetration as well, so sometimes the NSA has to fix vulnerabilities without explaining why they are a vulnerability because the attack strategy is classified.

The only way to be safe is an 'air gap'. Why do you think all national defense & intelligence agencies use that method, at a minimum?

If you wanted to be paranoid, you'd run an OpenBSD machine which has no physical network port. If you wanted to take a few chances, you could run it in a VM which has no networking virtual device.


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posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by 547000

Originally posted by coder22
For those of you who are developers - below is the kind of thing I'm talking about - dodgy code written on purpose that looks legit, that can get past a check by other programmers looking over the code. Then, when said mistake is discovered, it looks like an honest mistake.

for(c = buf;*c;c++) [
if(isdigit(*c)) [
if(!ws) [ // new number, increment location.
ws = 1; x++;
if(x >= width * 3) [
y++; x = 0;
]
]
if(x > rx * 3 && x ry && y < ry + rheight)
putchar('0');
else
putchar(*c);

] else [
ws = 0;
putchar(*c);
]
]

Now, programmers - tell me what is wrong with that code?

EDIT: ATS autoformatted out the tabs and indents but you see what I mean....
edit on 24-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)


I have no idea what that does. There are no helpful comments, I don't know what the name of the function is, and the variable names do not give any context. I would tell that programmer to read Code Complete. Is this outsourced code by any chance?


outsourced ? gimme a break man...



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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Does anyone here who uses MS's OS monitor their port packet traffic in real-time and study the data report?

If you took the time to just monitor system processes and listen to what your OS is doing it is obvious that MS has a constant flux of packet traffic coming from the OS even if you do not choose to download their updates(which will eventually crash your system as well.

MS constantly forces the OS's critical .dll & .ocx file registries to rewrite regardless of what you the customer wants, and gets away with it through their EULA, so keep prostrating to your digital God because BY LAW you ultimately agree to surrender info to them regardless of whether or not you care to. MS has a mean team of sharks who are $paid$ to inject their venom into your system via that lovely legal instrument YOU NEVER READ when you install their OS's!

Enjoy being watched like 1984, for you could never take them to court, or shall I say you may spend money taking them to court. you will just end up losing precious time out of your lives and a lot of money in futility!

So what are you going to do?

Build your own OS? You just may have a lot of interoperability & compatibility issues with running apps and progs, browsers, ect.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by AnthraAndromda
Or, you could just get a cheap firewall ($100.00 or so) and block all ports except port 80 (Internet). Your system will have all the protection it can get, unless you spend more on the firewall.


Rogue services may still use port 80 to POST over http (i made a custom app that did something like this for easy transfer of binary files to a webserver, since the user needed something really easy to send me files).

Usually you would also want to have DNS and FTP ports available to pass thru the firewall too. This would still not prevent a service like FTP from being able to run it's traffic on another port that is usually reserved for another type of traffic. As long as the architects know which IP and PORTS run a custom service, you have almost endless options after running an initial PORT SCANNER to check which ports pass the firewall test. The best thing is to completely remove all network connections, and put the computer inside a metal shielded security room. There's so many options and ways to leak stuff through firewalls, but most modern firewalls can do real packet analyzer check to see what kind of traffic is actually traversing on a port, But there are still other ways.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by ravenflt
 


Agreed; the best security is no network connection, though, that wuld make your machine almost useless for most "modern" work. I know that I can't get along with the Internet ... in my psudo-retirement I write many Web Controls and Applications.

The use of a faraday cage is nearly useless since your case is already a faraday cage and does a nice job of shielding your machines EM. But, I guess it is a wee bit less than a Copper Screen Room.

The question I might have is: "How are you "POSTing" to my client? It is rather difficult to get a browser to "snoop" in Ones file base. I was under the impression that POST was a server request. And, I do know that there are no library methods to POST to a client, but, then again, I've never tried with the existing methods.



you have almost endless options after running an initial PORT SCANNER to check which ports pass the firewall test


God! I must live a charmed life; every single firewall I've ever used or had blocked port scanning, they all also did stateful packet inspection.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by coder22
 




(This is especially fun with online multiplayer games..)


And, what games would those be?

The only MMO I've played is World of Warcraft, but after a few years, I'm burning out on that one (not enough of the right improvments).



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by Nobama
reply to post by LargeFries
 


I've said it already in here, but 10 times out of 10 the problem exist between keyboard and user

I've maintain countless HPs and they all worked flawlessly, but only a fool would buy a prebuilt computer, it's cheaper to build your own , and YOU know whats going in it.


Nobama I have to agree, almost every time PC problems are operator induced, and quite often they did it within the last 24-48 hours. This particular situation was the only time I've been beaten by a grumpy PC. I'm no geek, I just persevere and seek online info doggedly. The mobo/CPU having to have the tattoo flashed was completely beyond my comprehension, I'll admit.

I also have to agree with you that building ones own PC really is the way to go. I miss the old days of rebates on components, it use to be darn near free to put together a decent little box.

Also have to admit that we have owned at least six HP PC's, and only that one time did I have a problem. We have also had good luck with HP big screen TV, three all-in-one's and several digital cameras.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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It is shame that people use kiddie tools that come up on the radar very easily. The Gov also baits and traps for the "active" pinggers out there who try to flex skill they don't have. The Gov use HP's also since they keep a contract with them. So sad that MOST of them do not know the ethics involved! 24-48 hrs is about the time frame they get caught in.

HP computers are ok, I own one and have pwned many thru the past years, child's play for suckers who attempt to break into someone's system via forums or any other method.

Once again I find script kiddies to be funny and VERY gullible.
(wink)
edit on 24-4-2011 by maestromason because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by autowrench
***snip***
I have a custom box running PC Linux Gnome. It is fast and stable, and I can do anything a Windows PC can do except perhaps play games, but them, computers were not meant to play games on all the time, were they?


"I can do anything a Windows PC can do except ..."

We hear that a lot from Linux users.

When do you learn that you can't say "I can do anything, except" and NOT have people laugh?

I can do anything I put my mind to. But I refrain from putting my mind to flying, and killing tigers with my bare hands, and lifting a full grown elephant with my teeth, and eat the pyramids, and and and and



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by AnthraAndromda
***snip***
God! I must live a charmed life; every single firewall I've ever used or had blocked port scanning, they all also did stateful packet inspection.


Best firewall I ever had was my brand new Windows 7 Pro.

Every few minutes (10-20) it reset my router by sending it bogus data.

Fresh installation. Only one program installed (Sony Vegas 9).

Now my brand new Windows 7 Pro is back in the box.
Hang on. Maybe the new SP1 has fixed it? Hmmm.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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I love it when people hop into a thread with both feet whilst vomiting the first thing that comes to mind, without reading all previous posts. I don't think this thread was started to be a "Linux us better than Windows" rant, there are many tech sties that encourage that. I don't think this thread was started for everyone to post their opinions on that they think Microsoft can and can not do.

Read my post on Page 2 of this thread, follow the links and educate yourself...

Please!



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by 547000



It's openly admitted online. Google "Linux documentation is crap" and see for yourself what even Linux advocates say, since you have not the experience needed to know this. I am both computer literate and have used technical distributions. You will spend hours getting software to work, the documentation will be #, and you will ask users who will then say RTFM, and much of what you search on the web will assume you have a distribution like Ubuntu.


There's Linux documentation? I've never run across any. There's a manual somewhere so folks can tell me to RTFM? I've not seen it, either.

I've only ever had two issues with Linux. One is trying to get an Nvidia graphics card to work with it, which I actually got fixed once, after two days work. It didn't stay fixed though, after an upgrade, and never got it right again. The other was the annoying refusal to let me log in as root, and so not giving me full control over my system. Got that fixed too, twice, after about a days worth of working on it.

Some documentation or a manual would have sure been helpful.

One other issue is that some of the software I use only comes in Windows flavors.

As a half-assed resolution, I've set up a dual boot system, and use Windows for the graphics intensive stuff, and some of the software (mostly mapping programs, which are graphics intensive anyhow), and Linux for other stuff.

No manuals or documentation were soiled in the production of this box. Couldn't find any.



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