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Windows coders write buggy code - ON PURPOSE.

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posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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Guys - I have a friend on the "inside" - he's a microsoft employee that claims there is a team of programmers that purposefully write vulnerable code (at the request of the guys at the top).

This malicious code is ****written in a way to look like it could be passed off as an "accidental bug"**** for plausible deniability!!! He is going to be passing me the minutes of one of their meetings to upload so I can whistle-blow.

I have been told that these software holes are frequently written and installed in updates etc etc - at the request of CIA. - And in fact, some of the programming team ***IS*** CIA.

The beauty really is, is that when they are discovered, they just look like, "oops!! I little bug - we'll fix that with a patch..." but the reality is, that when holes are being patched, new holes are being opened. Accidentally on purpose. It's all about plausible deniability. I mean seriously, a code myself, simply missing a closing ] etc in the right place can cause all sorts of problems. - And that's the kind of thing they're doing. Or writing "error checking" code that is actually malicious.

Hopefully I'll get these minutes in the next few days. People will be named and shamed.

EDIT TO ADD: I don't think these bugs are written to spy on your average Joe, these are bugs written for global spying. Governmental stuff.

Soundbite by me from later in thread :

...imagine having a backdoor in the worlds most popular operating system? And also, if discovered, it looks like a totally innocent bug that could have happened to anyone? What you have then, is a VERY powerful weapon.


edit on 22-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by coder22
 
Wow, that's crazy if true. I really wouldn't be surprised though. Everybody's a friggin criminal these days, especially online. There's just one scam after another going on these days.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by coder22
He is going to be passing me the minutes of one of their meetings to upload so I can whistle-blow.


Wont prove anything. Microsoft will deny.
Given some time, I could write up some minutes to any meeting you wish, as could a lot of people here. Especially if, as is common nowdays, they are typed up and there is no handwritten original that you have access to.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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You just can't trust closed source software - much the same way you can't trust a restaurant that has a kitchen tucked away at the back.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Hmm.. You're probably right.


I guess we can only wait and see till I get the minutes.
edit on 22-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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Just another reason to use Mac.
OP, are you an Apple employee?



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by christof94
Just another reason to use Mac.
OP, are you an Apple employee?


Haha, nope! I use Linux. Apple is just as bad, closed source.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by christof94
 


Watch out for tomorrow's scandal: "Mac coders write buggy code - ON PURPOSE."

Just kidding... it'll be interesting to see these minutes, but pretty trivial to fake.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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Is there any way to rewrite the code so that I have no one spying on me?


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posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Couple of thoughts:

1. You probably should have waited to say anything until you had the actual evidence to "whistle-blow". Doing this the way you did may have just given them a heads-up and put your friend in jeopardy.

2. I ran across a thread here the other day where a guy claimed to have a "source" in NASA and that NASA wasn't telling us the truth about comet Elenin. After repeated requests for proof, and proof provided by other posters to the contrary, the OP absolutely failed to provide any proof, but the post still went on for over 30 pages. Somehow I think this is going to be another one of those posts.

If I'm wrong, I'll eat my words, but...we'll see.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by FreedomCommander
 


The best way would probably be to back up you music / photos / work / documents / etc and then install some flavour of linux. You can choose, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Debian - any of them are pretty newbie friendly these days.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Yeah go for it man and good luck!



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by notsofunnyguy
 


Hey thanks for the reply - Well, I can only hope my guy does deliver the goods. You're probably right that I should have waited.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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It always seemed strange to me that other operating systems are out there with only a handful of vulnerabilities, yet the most popular one is ridden with holes.

As another poster said though, until we have the proof, it's just hearsay...



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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It is absolutely True.

But no worries..
All your PC Troubles can End Here~
Take back your computers.




posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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Maybe Anonymous could
check it out and see what the scoop is.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
It always seemed strange to me that other operating systems are out there with only a handful of vulnerabilities, yet the most popular one is ridden with holes.

As another poster said though, until we have the proof, it's just hearsay...


Yes, that's why - it's the most popular one. It's closed source. The prefect combination for writing underhanded code, for maximum rewards.

Also think about it like this, imagine having a backdoor in the worlds most popular operating system? And also, if discovered, it looks like a totally innocent bug that could have happened to anyone? What you have then, is a VERY powerful weapon.
edit on 22-4-2011 by coder22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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If there is such a thing as intentional errors in programming I would find it more likely it happens because of the "disgruntled employee", a kind of David vs. Goliath using public humiliation as a stone, the errors as the slingshot. Afterall not being able to guarantee your users safety has always been embarassing for any IT company. Maybe he'd even try and cover it up towards his collegues who find out making up a story about being recruited into the CIA.

Or maybe it's because of competition from a rival firm where an employee would be approached and paid money for making intentional errors thereby reducing productivity and possibly embarassing the company towards it's customers.

Maybe secret services actively search for exploits to gain access to a computer, it wouldn't surprise me. But to help create them, I don't think so. People who have things to hide usually take more safety measures anyway, even if an OS has backdoors there are always things as router security, IDS, encryption, etc.



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by christof94
Just another reason to use Mac.
OP, are you an Apple employee?


Ahem....


Two security researchers have discovered a simple way to map out where you've been almost anywhere in the world—without any hacking involved. The information comes from a location cache file found within your iPhone's backups on your Mac or PC, bringing out serious privacy concerns and opening the door for a jealous spouse, thief, or even a crafty trojan to take a detailed look at your whereabouts. And it's information that no one should have access to—not even law enforcement, barring a court order.



So your iPhone—and probably your computer—now both have a file that mirrors data that was previously limited to law enforcement, which itself was only able to obtain it from a court order. Without encrypted backups, someone who has access to your computer can see your whereabouts. "By passively logging your location without your permission, Apple have made it possible for anyone from a jealous spouse to a private investigator to get a detailed picture of your movements," the team wrote. But even if you check the box to encrypt your iPhone backups on the computer, the file is still unencrypted on your iPhone, and it wouldn't be hard for someone with ill intentions to access it. (1)


Pretty convenient no? Especially considering the police (Michigan example) are now downloading phone information at traffic stops, legally and without a need for court orders.


So, is there anywhere you've been in the last year that you don't want anyone to know about?



posted on Apr, 22 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Dragonfly79
 


You made some very good points.

I'd like to point out though, that there is apparently a backdoor in the aes256 encryption. The whole wikileaks, "insurance.aes256" file (I believe) was an attempt to flush out those who knew the backdoor, to trap them. But that story is for another thread altogether.




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