A Survivalist's best friend is a weed?

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posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:02 AM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Called "Soldier's Herb" in Medieval Europe due to it's coagulant properties, Plantain contains Alantoin and Aucubin which studies have proven to help stanch the flow of blood.
Due to these properties those who take blood thinners or are prone to blood clots should not take this herb internally.


Question here, as I was thinking about this part of it. Would the mention of blood thinners pertain to only things like Coumadin (warfarin) or would it also apply to those who are taking a low dose aspirin per day for 'heart health'? I'm not on that kind of a program, however, some in my 'group' are and this would be a need to know kind of thing for me.

Thanks in advance!
~MMIMO




posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by maybee
 


Your granny was talking about Phytolacca americana or pokeweed "poke salad". The plant is poisonous but young leaves while still green (they turn red with age) were boiled several times in fresh changes of water to extract the toxins. I wouldn't recommend this plant as a wild edible due to this.
People will be tempted because it's so common and so large.
If you insist on trying it use only leaves from plants that are less than a foot tall and have no red in them.
Remember to boil it 3 times in fresh changes of water.
Poke is being investigated for the treatment of HIV/Aids and seems potentially helpful. Could be good news for those suffering.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by MyMindIsMyOwn
 


I would check with a doctor or naturopath MD first.
I wish I could provide a more definitive answer than "I don't know" .
Sorry I can't be of more help with that.

As with any wild plant if your unsure then don't use it.
I would suspect that Plantain would not be good for those with high blood pressure, just my intuition.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


Thanks Dan, this is great link everyone.
Some great info - www.learningherbs.com...
edit on 21-4-2011 by Asktheanimals because: added link



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:19 AM
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This was helpful and interesting. I know what i'm having for dinner tonight.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by maybee
 


I actually ate some polk yesterday and it was amazing. I grew up in eastern Kentucky and alot of these plants are still available in abundance in that area as is it still very rural. My dad will still call me to this day and tell me it is about time to start picking the polk and plantain as he has fields of them in areas near home. I never really knew all of how healthy they actually were.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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____________

Now I have a good excuse not to mow the lawn


____________



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


Hey no worries there. Just a question that came to mind. As I always do I'll run it by my Dr. before using it for any medicinal purpose. My Dr is getting sick of me and my seemingly endless questions!
I'll just add it to my laundry list of questions for her.

But thanks for the response! If you would like I'll let you know what she says on this.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 
Very nice OP! Star and Flag.

My experience with eating broadleaf plantain, if you don't plan on cooking it through until soft, is to stick with the smallest leaves. The large ones can be stringy. My mother cooked the leaves in an iron skillet with hot bacon dressing ( bacon w/the drippings, sugar and vinegar), that was good eating.

I've used plantain poultices on bee stings and burns and found them to be effective.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
reply to post by Asktheanimals
 
Very nice OP! Star and Flag.

My experience with eating broadleaf plantain, if you don't plan on cooking it through until soft, is to stick with the smallest leaves. The large ones can be stringy. My mother cooked the leaves in an iron skillet with hot bacon dressing ( bacon w/the drippings, sugar and vinegar), that was good eating.

I've used plantain poultices on bee stings and burns and found them to be effective.


You know whereof you speak. The leaves can be very stringy and the small young leaves are best, I was hoping someone with real experience would chime in, that bacon grease makes a world of difference! If you don't have grease a little salad vinegar goes a long ways towards making wild greens more palatable.

I felled a tree once that landed on a yellow jacket nest. I was using a chainsaw and had ear protection on so I didn't hear them but only felt the stings when several dozen decided they didn't like me. I was amazed at how fast Plantain took the pain and swelling out of the stings. Nothing you can buy is better for it. The best things in life really are free!

Great reply, thanks Butcherguy



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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Great post. I remember my grandmother telling me about the healing properties of this plant. They grow all over Europe as far as I can tell. I haven't seen it grown here in California (maybe I don't recognize the American version of the plant). It's amazing what we have growing all around us, and what useful plants we kill in favor of manicured lawns and clean sidewalks. Sometimes we completely misunderstand our environment.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Any plant you find in a garden, is growing wild somewhere.
Humans took these wild strains and cultivated and saved the best seeds for future propagation.

Nice find on the asparagus though! Out in the desert, wild finds are few are far between!


Oh, and S&F to the OP, great post!
edit on 21-4-2011 by 1FullHouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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One of the most versatile plants also is lol Kudzu here in the south. It is
very high in protein (leaves-tastes a bit like green peas), roots are starchy
and have eaten them like potatoes, flowers make an awesome jelly.
It also has some medicinal uses as well and best of all it never runs out.

If people knew all the good food that comes from this plant it would be wiped out in instead of nuisance vine.

I cooked Kudzu casserole last night and also I have eaten polk salad for years.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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Taking things internally...
Is that ingesting or does it also cover applying it to open wounds or bites?



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by horsebones
 


Internally = ingesting. Topical use is making a poultice or using as a bandage.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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Thanks for the information OP, starred & flagged




[off topic comments removed]




edit on 4/21/2011 by 12m8keall2c because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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S&F These little plants are wonderful. They grow everywhere and are delicious! Im going to have to try kudzu next. Thank you for sharing the word on weeds



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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milkweed fibers are a good one to weave for fresh water fish...
www.suite101.com...
crowcallingwoman.blogspot.com...

candle wicking too
edit on 21-4-2011 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

and as food
www.wildfoods.info...
edit on 21-4-2011 by Danbones because: (no reason given)





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