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Three Words That Could Overthrow Physics: “What Is Magnetism?”

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posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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Discover Magazine Editorial



The standard model still doesn't describe magnets' spooky action at a distance. by Bruno Maddox From the May 2008 issue; published online April 24, 2008

When Pliny the Elder first beheld a magnet, he was utterly blown away. “What phenomenon is more astonishing?” he wrote later. “Where has nature shown greater audacity?” In the fifth century, St. Augustine of Hippo agreed, declaring himself “thunder­struck” by the sight of a magnet lifting several metal rings. Magnets, he announced, were proof that miracles were real and that God, therefore, existed. “Who would not be amazed,” Augustine marveled, “at this virtue of the stone?” Certainly the 4-year-old Albert Einstein was amazed. When his father showed him a compass, it was young Albert’s first clue, he later wrote, that there was “something behind things, something deeply hidden,” and he spent his life trying to find it. What was it that so impressed these men? These giants? It was that a magnet could move things without touching them. In science this feat is known as “action at a distance,” and it was something that used to impress people. People would see a magnet move a piece of metal, or a moon trapped in orbit around a planet, or a man in a restaurant levitate a saltshaker just by looking at it, and they would wonder how it was possible. After all, as Isaac Newton pointed out in his Principia, the notion “that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophic matters a competent faculty of thinking could ever fall into it.” Me neither. But it would appear that guys like Einstein, Newton, and myself —guys who see Thing A controlling Thing B at a distance and wonder about it—are all of a sudden rather thin on the ground. You see, at the end of last year, while vacationing with my family at an undisclosed rural location, I found myself reclining by a fireplace with a book titled Electronics for Dummies by Gordon McComb and Earl Boysen. advertisement | article continues below On page 10 of that volume, I read that electrons repelled each other without touching, in the same way that two magnets will if you align them with their like poles facing. At this point, realizing that I must have either slept through or forgotten the high school physics class where it was explained how magnets manage that singular feat of interacting with each other at a distance, I set out on what I assumed would be a minutes-long odyssey to understand the phenomenon. Seventy-one days later, I am here with astonishing findings. For one thing, as far as I can tell, nobody knows how a magnet can move a piece of metal without touching it. And for another—more astonishing still, perhaps—nobody seems to care. This information was not easy to come by. My copy of Electronics for Dummies now shares a shelf with Mathematics of Classical and Quantum Physics by Frederick Byron Jr. and Robert Fuller. Should a doctor at any point take a cross section of my brain, she will find patches of scarring and dead tissue, souvenirs of the time I pursued the mystery of magnetism across the 11-dimensional badlands of string theory. Students of human pathos may one day cherish the 16-minute recording of me, with my 100 percent positive-feedback rating as an eBay purchaser, failing to make renowned physicist Steven Weinberg, who won a Nobel for unifying electromagnetism with the so-called weak force, admit that he can’t explain how a magnet holds a dry-cleaning ticket to the door of a refrigerator. But as far as I can tell—and isn’t the point of science that all its bigger propositions come accompanied by this noble caveat?—he really can’t. When you get right down to it, the mystery of magnets interacting with each other at a distance has been explained in terms of virtual photons, incredibly small and unapologetically imaginary particles interacting with each other at a distance. As far as I can tell, these virtual particles are composed entirely of math and exist solely to fill otherwise embarrassing gaps in physics, such as the attraction and repulsion between magnets. And as far as I can tell, because I’ve had it repeatedly and rather pityingly told to me, to want to pursue the matter any further is an impulse that marks its sufferer out as a man who doesn’t know an awful lot about physics, or science, or the pursuit of truth in general. What I have learned, in other words, after 71 days of strenuous research, is that I and my fellow Dummies no longer have a seat, if we ever did, at the dinner table of science. If we’re going to find any satisfaction in this gloomy vale of misery and mystery, we’re going to have to take matters into our own hands and start again, from first principles. On this day, this very hour, starting with the magnets holding my gym’s yoga schedule to the creaking door of my filthy refrigerator, it begins.


Oh, joy unspeakable. One of my favorite examples of how mainstream science is lacking in something fundamental to the nth degree, while at the same time claiming a divine right to define reality for us. They don't understand how magnets work, but they are so insightful they can dismiss anything outside their understanding with a handy ad hominem and an appeal to authority, and whatever other logical fallacies come to mind at the moment. (hearty laughter) - g
edit on 20-4-2011 by grizzle2 because: typo




posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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United Nations designed Agenda 21 "educational" materials - "Reality is best defined by those that authorities characterize as experts".
If they say 2+2=5, it's 5. Shut up, who do you think you are?!



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by grizzle2
 





They don't understand how magnets work, but they are so insightful they can dismiss anything outside their understanding with a handy ad hominem and an appeal to authority, and whatever other logical fallacies come to mind at the moment.


Ahh yes but everyone else can easily dismiss the countless things physics has described accurately. the fact is science HAS to dismiss random untestable theories and conjecture, or it isn't science it's faith. If you have a theory, awesome, if there is nothing testable it's not a scientific theory.

In science there is no room for miracles. Just because we can't describe why atoms have mass, doesn't mean they don't. They do indeed and we have a theory, that can be tested and actually is, to determine if the theory is correct.

Just because we can't explain the spooky nature of magnetism, doesn't mean we never will. In fact, I would suspect magnetism will be one of the puzzles solved when they find the Mass particle with the LHC.

Until you have a workable theory that can be replicated, you have no leg to stand on when moaning about science.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 11:56 AM
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You know. You bring up something really interesting.
This is something that should be fundamental. However you say it's not.
I think that we need to put some feet to the fire and really grill the scientific community to really study this.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by grizzle2
 





They don't understand how magnets work, but they are so insightful they can dismiss anything outside their understanding with a handy ad hominem and an appeal to authority, and whatever other logical fallacies come to mind at the moment.


Ahh yes but everyone else can easily dismiss the countless things physics has described accurately. the fact is science HAS to dismiss random untestable theories and conjecture, or it isn't science it's faith. If you have a theory, awesome, if there is nothing testable it's not a scientific theory.

In science there is no room for miracles. Just because we can't describe why atoms have mass, doesn't mean they don't. They do indeed and we have a theory, that can be tested and actually is, to determine if the theory is correct.

Just because we can't explain the spooky nature of magnetism, doesn't mean we never will. In fact, I would suspect magnetism will be one of the puzzles solved when they find the Mass particle with the LHC.

Until you have a workable theory that can be replicated, you have no leg to stand on when moaning about science.


Bull! We should be moaning and complaining. This is a fundamental force of nature.
It should be understood and explained.
It could open up some technology that can benefit the planet.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwatersUntil you have a workable theory that can be replicated, you have no leg to stand on when moaning about science.


Sure I do. If someone acts like they understand everything, and they don't even understand any of the basics, you're saying I have to understand everything to be justified in criticizing them? Mainstream science makes sure that there are no advances in understanding reality. "Science has nothing to do with nature." - Max Planck
Well, guess what, we do.
This is not without real-life consequences. These people are responsible for poisoning us, for stamping out any research that doesn't fit their preconceived and erroneous ideas (research which likely really would improve our quality of life without destroying the world), but they excel in inventing engines of death. That seems to be their primary success.
Gauss discovered / invented a new geometry, but kept it to himself for 30 years, because he didn't want to have to deal with being pilloried by these well-connected buffoons. They censor and demand censorship when their views are questioned. And like economists, they try to cover it all up in sophistries, deceptions that involve a lot of complex details.Arbiters of reality, my behind.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwatersAhh yes but everyone else can easily dismiss the countless things physics has described accurately.


How do you know anything they've described has been described accurately? If they can't explain how a magnet works, it is as the title of the article says, the rest of physics comes into question.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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That is a very well written editorial there , thanks for posting OP.
I think we are missing the big picture in physics and magnetism is related in some way to gravity and that the solution to this may be as mind blowing as general relativity.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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Was this written by clowns?

I really wanted to post a picture with this post, but 98% of them violate the T&C



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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The more we think we know, the more it seems we don't know anything.
It seems to me that science is - in some respects - is a house of cards: One theory based on another... but the true base remains "unknown".
Perhaps what we think we know is all based on something we truely don't know.
If & when we find out, it is possible the house of cards comes tumbling down.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by jessejamesxx
 


Why do you ask?



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by bluemooone2
 


You're welcome. But that's far from all of it. There's the red shift equation that demands an "infinite number of photons", for instance. How can that be right? De Broglie had to posit "pilot waves" to patch over some severe problems in physics. Physicists can tell you what energy does ("capacity to do work") but they can't tell you what it is. It really is all about throwing a load of chaff in the air and hoping no one will see beyond the lingo.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by grizzle2
 



How do you know anything they've described has been described accurately? If they can't explain how a magnet works, it is as the title of the article says, the rest of physics comes into question.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but if there is greater insight to magnetism in the next hundred years it isn't going to make people walk upside down or float away from the Earth at random intervals.

...Animals will not turn inside out, Bees will not turn into Humans, The Moon will not crash into the Earth, The Sun will still work....

Science is updated, and evolves, new ideas into magnetism isn't going to mean the Nuclear bombs that dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima never happened....



We lack complete understanding on something = therefore = everything else must be false!

Of course, we can also turn to the cranks and crackpots who have everything figured out already:


In 1979, Hutchison claimed to have discovered a number of unusual phenomena, while trying to duplicate experiments done by Nikola Tesla. He refers to several of these phenomena jointly under the name "the Hutchison effect", including:

1.levitation of heavy objects.
2.fusion of dissimilar materials such as metal and wood, while lacking any displacement.
3.the anomalous heating of metals without burning adjacent material.
4.the spontaneous fracturing of metals.
5.changes in the crystalline structure and physical properties of metals.
6.disappearance of metal samples.



John Hutchison




edit on 20-4-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by jessejamesxx
Was this written by clowns?

I really wanted to post a picture with this post, but 98% of them violate the T&C


You can explain to us how magnets work now. Regale us with your knowledge.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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I'm reading a book right now, "the Body Electric", and just saw that magnetism is still a mystery. I too, was dumbfounded (found out I'm dumb..... but I've had my suspicions for a while anyway....
)

It's just that for most of us common people, we tend to assume, by the attitudes of those who are more knowledgeable, that all thigns like that are understood and known already.

To know this is not true does not in any way make me think science should no longer be valued, only that some scientific minds have some serious insecurity issues, being so afraid to admit some room for unknowns, for fear that they'll be rejected for not being all knowing Gods.

On the contrary, it makes science all the more interesting and something to follow- someone might still figure out mysteries like that at any moment!



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by boncho....


Chaff, and pics from your private stash of homosexual erotica doesn't answer the question. Explain to us how magnets work, and quit putting words in people's mouths. That's another logical fallacy, and believe it or not, most people can recognize it for what it is.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by grizzle2
You can explain to us how magnets work now. Regale us with your knowledge.

My post was about an internet meme that spread like wildfire having to do with a song about "Miracles", talking about magnets and other 'mysterious' things, written by clowns that 'sing'.

I encourage you to watch the video. They share the same sentiment found in the OP article and this thread.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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Originally posted by grizzle2

Originally posted by boncho....


Chaff, and pics from your private stash of homosexual erotica doesn't answer the question. Explain to us how magnets work, and quit putting words in people's mouths. That's another logical fallacy, and believe it or not, most people can recognize it for what it is.


How am I putting words into peoples mouths when they make statements like:


the rest of physics comes into question.


Oh, and that is John Hutchison. He invented anti-gravity, knows all about magnets too.

You should ask him your question.




posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by mechengIt seems to me that science is - in some respects - is a house of cards: One theory based on another... but the true base remains "unknown".


Most people have no idea. I'm sure I don't know the half of it. But it's not just limited to physics, not by far. Mainstream scientists start with false premises and extrapolate ad absurdum ad infinitum. Professors fail students who see their game, en masse. So what we're left with is a willfully-ignorant political machine that enforces a stack of lies a mile high. Not all of mainstream science is lies, and not all mainstream scientists are evil liars. But they know which side their bread is buttered on, that's for sure.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by grizzle2
 



Bruno Maddox (born 1969) is a British literary novelist and journalist who is best known for his critically lauded novel My Little Blue Dress (2001) and for his satirical magazine essays.


Most importantly: /


....he also contributes a monthly humor column to Discover magazine called "Blinded by Science".


Talk about taking things out of context...

Bruno Maddox

The OP article is written by a novelist, journalist, who studied English Lit. and writes satire...
edit on 20-4-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



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