Planets With Two Suns Can Grow Black Trees

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posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Planets With Two Suns Can Grow Black Trees



Apparently Planets with two suns should be able to in some instances grow black trees. That is of course; if the planet can grow trees!


We discover so many new things about our Universe everyday it amazes me; the trivialities of things on Earth seem but nothing compared to the vastness of space. It truly is amazing times we are living in.

I Just wanted to show people this article i saw on space.com today i have been reading the site for 6+ years now and found this concept quite interesting. Discuss!


www.space.com...

Planet With Two Suns


Planet With Black Plants


Please read the article to it is quite interesting; i must say


I'd appreciate if you guys checked out my other threads too some interesting discussions and stuff. If you're into space
edit on 18-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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There is unrest in the forest,
There is trouble with the trees. . .



Sorry, just had to do it.

BTW the universe if full of infinite wonders. . . cool find!
edit on 4/18/2011 by AnteBellum because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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I just read that and it's a pretty cool thought, i guess we won't know until we see it though



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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Would be some pretty creepy looking plants.

Imagine black plants everywhere to get a better idea i imbeded the picture from the site
Lol
edit on 18-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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Black plants and trees? That's my kind of planet. **** this planet then. I want to live on one of those planets where all of the plants, grass and trees are black, including the ground. A purple or red sky would be nice too.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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Lots of 2 suns talk going around in lamestream media.
Kind of funny, makes you wonder sometimes.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by Condemned0625
Black plants and trees? That's my kind of planet. **** this planet then. I want to live on one of those planets where all of the plants, grass and trees are black, including the ground. A purple or red sky would be nice too.


Are you sure we are not related???

edit on 4/18/2011 by AnteBellum because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


Fun Fact approximately 50% of solar systems are multiple star systems. Look like Tatooine might exist after all Obi-wan !



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:47 PM
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Originally posted by XRaDiiX

Planets With Two Suns Can Grow Black Trees



Interesting idea.
In theory, it could even happen here on earth if a plant "decided" that the cost of making a green light absorbing chlorophyl like substance was worth the cost.

But back to the story... the leap of logic they employ is lost to me.
On earth, plants absorb red and blue light because thats where the most energy is, and so the cost/benefit ratio for plant biology is high... and the chlorophyll molecule is optimised for it.
But
"Plants with dim red dwarf suns, for example, may appear black
to our eyes, absorbing across the entire visible wavelength range
in order to use as much of the available light as possible," O'Malley-James said.


Thats what doesnt make sense to me. He's saying
- if the light is dim red
- then plants will absorb red green and blue.

Whereas to me I think they'd just evolve to grab the red light, and not bother with green and blue, leaving the planet with CYAN plants.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
 


You'd like to live on a planet like that too? Maybe we could start a colony, grow some crops and have black mashed potatoes at dinner time. LOL!



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Hey tell that to the writers of the article i didn't write it lol. I checked it out and was confused by that but they stated clearly in the article that the plants quote





Most plants on Earth are green because they enlist a biomolecule called chlorophyll to drive photosynthesis. Chlorophyll absorbs sunlight in the blue and red wavelengths most strongly, which makes sense; blue light is extremely energetic, and our sun throws off red light in great volumes.

Chlorophyll reflects sunlight around the green part of the electromagnetic spectrum, on the other hand, which is why leaves look green to us.




They made an error might is spelled mght lol*


They found that alien planets orbiting such stars mght indeed host plant life very different than the green stuff we're used to here on Earth. [Top 10 Star Mysteries]

"Plants with dim red dwarf suns, for example, may appear black to our eyes, absorbing across the entire visible wavelength range in order to use as much of the available light as possible," O'Malley-James said.

O'Malley-James presented the team's results today (April 18) at the Royal Astronomical Society's national meeting in Llandudno, Wales.


See so what it is basically saying is when the red dwarf is really dim the plant may utilise all spectrums of colour through photosynthesis or whatever process may be present for that plant life on said planet....
One thing my friend when have a plant absorbing colours from all spectrums you will get a brown or blackish dark colour plant that is why. Peace


I quote again so you see it


absorbing across the entire visible wavelength range in order to use as much of the available light as possible

edit on 18-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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I wonder the quality of their cannabis? lol

Cool post bro, thanks!



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by Condemned0625
 


Deal!


And my neighbors thought I was crazy when I painted my house black primer, with gargoyles and red lighting everywhere!
I told them I was decorating for halloween. . . little did they know!



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
 


I want to come to your house now. Anyways, I'll stop posting off-topic replies before moderators start deleting our posts.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by Condemned0625
 


Please don't delete their posts mods i authored this thread

Talk all you want guys; thread is open to discussion. Unless the mods have something to say about it i guess!
edit on 18-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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Ok, maybe I've figured this out. Its possible that the non-obvious result that Jack O'Malley James came up with is as a combination of poor journalism and not reading the article properly.

The original paper was presented at a meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society...
RAS
where it says...
The potential for hosting photosynthetic life on Earth-like planets within
binary/multiple star systems was evaluated by modelling levels of
photosynthetically active radiation
Combinations of M and G stars in: (i) close-binary systems... were explored.


Type M stars are the red dwarfs, and type G stars are like our sun.

Now the news article does mention "sunlike stars" in passing, but the emphasis at the end in the quote only mentioning red dwarf stars makes the reader think that this is the important bit. But it isnt.
Looking at the comments places on other websites where this article has appeared, it seems that many others who read it was mislead as well.

Depending on how BOTH of the available spectrum to the plant is distributed, the plant gets a good dose of red, green and blue, and thus make it worthwhile to get them all, and reflect none.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Yes you are right i think the Author of the article needed to clarify he mean't two suns instead of just one dim red dwarf. Because when you have two suns of different types especially then you would have the plants probably absorbing light across all Spectrums to utilise the light Spectrum to its advantage.

Thank you for pointing this out bad journalism i would surmise on Space.com's part.

They should have clarified it was a G-type (Sun) Star and a M or K-type Red Dwarf or Orange Dwarf Star in the solar system where the planet would possibly have black plants.

The journalists on that site are asleep sometimes i swear the other day one of their articles stated the WISE Telescope was a 320$ telescope. Many comments corrected the staff by saying 320,000,000 $ telescope. They make many mistakes in their articles i've been reading them a while.
edit on 18-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by XRaDiiX
 


Black plants? A lot less creepy than green ones--I suppose.



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by telephonemonkey
 

Agreed! Trees have always looked alien to me.

I think it's those twisted limbs





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