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Manuka honey 'could help fight superbugs'

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posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 03:59 AM
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i did not know where to put this

but i think survival is pretty apt and it could come in handy

with all the resistant bugs about

www.bbc.co.uk...

www.manukahoneybenefits.biz...

Manuka honey could be used to combat some of the most hard-to-treat infections that are resistant to powerful antibiotics, scientists say.

Lab experiments show it can clear bacteria found in festering wounds and contaminated hospital surfaces.

It works by breaking down the defences bacteria use against antibiotics, making it useful in treating superbug infections such as MRSA.
edit on 18-4-2011 by digby888 because: more info




posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:03 AM
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Originally posted by digby888
i did not know where to put this

but i think survival is pretty apt and it could come in handy

with all the resistant bugs about

www.bbc.co.uk...

Manuka honey could be used to combat some of the most hard-to-treat infections that are resistant to powerful antibiotics, scientists say.

Lab experiments show it can clear bacteria found in festering wounds and contaminated hospital surfaces.

It works by breaking down the defences bacteria use against antibiotics, making it useful in treating superbug infections such as MRSA.


cool



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:08 AM
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Manuka honey rules.

I had larengitis over new year, and I couldn't shift it for love nor money. But manuka honey saved the day. Yes, it's bloody expesive. (£10 per jar) But it's really good. I now have a jar in the fridge all the time. It's good for wounds too, so if my dogs ever get any more cuts, I can use manuka honey as a dressing. Nature over chemical science any day.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:10 AM
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Originally posted by Acidtastic
Manuka honey rules.

I had larengitis over new year, and I couldn't shift it for love nor money. But manuka honey saved the day. Yes, it's bloody expesive. (£10 per jar) But it's really good. I now have a jar in the fridge all the time. It's good for wounds too, so if my dogs ever get any more cuts, I can use manuka honey as a dressing. Nature over chemical science any day.


Well it's still chemical science as there are chemicals in the honey and science is used to figure out uses for it.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:30 AM
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Plenty of research into honey as a wound dressing done here in the UK. As the OP showed, plenty of goodness involved in natures cures.

That said, the ancients knew this full and well, its like we got so hyped up by our own artificial cures (man made in the lab) we scorned nature. Now nature is once again showing her full glory and shining a little light onto our arrogance.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:30 AM
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Honey has always been known to fight infection as it is a natural antibiotic another survival cure is the aloevera plant - not so much the extract that's used in cosmetics but split the leaf and use the sap from inside. Colloidal Silver has also be proven in the lab as pathogens cannot survive it when placed in a Petri dish - I've used it for years.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by digby888
 


Just want to throw out a word of caution, as for every lifesaver out there, there is a lifekiller. Honey is not good for everyone. I am allergic to just about every form of honey, yet I am not allergic to a bee. So, I have to be very careful when consuming any food with natural sugars that are from honey origins. And honey on the skin, for me, results in a very uncomfortable rash. I can't even imagine putting honey on an open wound ((shivers)).



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:34 AM
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Originally posted by digby888
Manuka honey could be used ...


Sorry, buts whats the actual news here?

From 2009...
Link

From 2007...
Link

From 2005...
Link

From 2001...
Honey was used to treat infected wounds
as long ago as 2000 years before bacteria
were discovered to be the cause of infection.

Link



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by alfa1
 

it might not be news to you but it is to me

i new it was good but not that good

and with he rise in super-bugs lately showing up in meat in supermarkets

and suchlike i thought it was important to put it out for the people like me

who dont already know about it



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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its true... i have known about manuka honey for years and eat it almost daily for breakfast.. it only comes from new zealand hence it is very expensive (as said above £10 odd for a jar) but is worth it, as it lasts ages..



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 09:17 AM
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All honey has healing properties and lasts ages.
What is Manuka?



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


here is what wiki says about it

Manuka honey is gathered in New Zealand from bees feeding on manuka, which grows uncultivated throughout the country. The honey has antibacterial properties, but its antimicrobial activity varies with origin and processing.

Antibacterial ratings

An agar-well diffusion assay is conducted on the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus to test the methylglyoxal’s antibacterial activities. Firstly, two wells are created in an agar plate, and S. aureus cells are scraped onto each well using an inoculating needle. After soaking small squares of blotter paper with methylglyoxal and phenol solution separately into the wells, each square is set in different ends of the agar plate using forceps and then left upside down in the refrigerator for a few days. After that, a comparison between the size and shape of the bacterial colonies is made to determine the antibacterial activities between the two. Varying concentrations of phenol solution are used to find one that coincides with the antibacterial potency of the methylglyoxal. This can allow fair comparison with UMF and MGO ratings and determine its accuracy.[3]

en.wikipedia.org...

www.manukahoney.co.uk...

What is known as 'Active' Manuka Honey has enjoyed growing acceptance by the academic and medical world in recent years, and reporting of the honey's unique properties has proliferated in the world's press and media.

Manuka honey comes from New Zealand where beekeepers set up their hives in wild uncultivted areas in which Manuka bushes grow. The bees gather nectar from the flowers of the Manuka bush, which is indigenous only to New Zealand. The honey making process is enriched by the pollution free environment of New Zealand, and certain harvests of Manuka Honey have attracted the gaze of the medicial and scientific community. Some of the Manuka Honey produced has been found to have some very special properties indeed.
edit on 18-4-2011 by digby888 because: more info



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