Secret Society Called "Guilderberg?"

page: 6
5
<< 3  4  5   >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 09:54 PM
link   
reply to post by RufusDriftwood
 

Exactly the point I was making. But people that see things like this want to believe. I think there is enough information posted by myself in this thread to completely disregard this group. There is for most people just by looking at it. As far as people that want concrete proof, some need a certification by the originator to believe it isn't real.

I don't know what to say to those people. I do consider on the other hand how easy it would be to make money off these schemes though....




posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 09:58 PM
link   
reply to post by boncho
 


Hey guys, this is the first time I've posted here, but I'm the "freelance writer" and "mom" that made the comment on the Guilderberg Facebook page. LOL, funny to see my post quoted. I'm still researching them, but this is what I know:

When I first started searching, there was NOTHING about them. Which struck me as odd, since if someone was scamming people at $1500 a pop you would think someone would complain.

I friended around six people from the group, including the grandmaster, Van Hausen. There was no pressure to join. A couple of people denied being a part of it even though they were friends with Van Hausen and others from the group. (I have since deleted them all)

I think that one person, possibly the grandmaster, has a thousand or more alter-egos on Facebook. Many of the people tag each other in pictures in order to look like they are active on Facebook.

I first found them on Linkedin, which looks much more legitimate. I joined the Linked in group because I was looking for funding for a non-profit. They said I was accepted into the Linkedin group because of my degree in International Relations and work in foreign policy. They have an "alternative government" that discusses and implements change in the world.

Many, many people involved in the Facebook group are involved heavily in the occult. I have even seen references to David Icke-ian reptiles. Obsessed with dragons. They all list each other as brothers and sisters.

If it's a hoax, it's very elaborate and huge.

If it's not a hoax, it seems pretty scary. Tempting of course; everyone wants to be a part of something bigger. Most people want to be in the "inner circle".

Many royals are listed as friends of the grandmaster's. They are possibly fake.

There are at least three photoshopped pictures on Guilderberg's page.

That's all I got
Hope it helps. If it's real, they are trying hard to make it look like a scam LOL. Now, the one thing that is strange is that NO ONE has complained online about being scammed. I know people are paying the $1500. I almost did. A few people on Linkedin did and I never heard from them again online.



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 10:28 PM
link   
reply to post by writerthinker
 



If it's not a hoax, it seems pretty scary. Tempting of course; everyone wants to be a part of something bigger. Most people want to be in the "inner circle".


The same way kids everywhere are tricked into joining gangs. Seems great at the start, lack of information seems mysterious, it's not until they are up to their necks in crazy that they realize it might not have been a good idea.

I can say this, if a secret society that was around for 500 years was coming out of the woodwork to actively recruit, all they would need to do is list some of their activities over the years. If they are going public, it would be easy to prove their existence to people.

The level of crazy associated with Icke and the Reptilian idea is far beyond nuthouse category... Funny to see that mentioned...



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by Diplomat
Below are 2 interesting pictures from the Guilderberg Facebook page that might be able to help us prove that it is a hoax. Both pictures have the word "Guilderberg" in them somewhere, but they look highly suspicious. The way the "Guilderberg" words look in the photos just screams photoshop.

www.facebook.com...

www.facebook.com...

Hopefully the links work, what do you think?
edit on 4/17/2011 by Diplomat because: (no reason given)



I would love to be able to comment on the second photo on facebook. Each individual appears to be Mason so I am sure someone will complain at some point.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:24 PM
link   
I think that for the amount of money they are asking it could be a way to stock up funds as they offer very little in return. I do find it to be interesting the societies that set a limit on your net worth as if it has some merit into you ability to be productive. I want to make a secret society for low income individuals that have a true understanding of the world and would possible be more productive than any high dollar society.

I noticed something about the "creepy" trademark the right an left side have different blooming flowers above the skull head. One side looks like a crescent with three smaller circles in front and the left side looks similar to tennis balls. The blooming flower above each side are also different with the left looking almost like a sunflower and the right looking like some sort of Hawaiian flower yet the edges are a little too pointed ( I can not seem to find the right flower). The left side of the skeleton appears to have one extra rib. Just my odd analytical perspective.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 03:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by UdderlyInsane

Originally posted by Diplomat
www.facebook.com...

Hopefully the links work, what do you think?
edit on 4/17/2011 by Diplomat because: (no reason given)



I would love to be able to comment on the second photo on facebook. Each individual appears to be Mason so I am sure someone will complain at some point.
The only complaint is what a bad photoshop job that is... Looks like a typical cornerstone ceremony in Hawaii, attended by a bunch of shriners. But adding "Guilderberg" in MS Paint doesn't make it very convincing...



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 04:49 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshNorton
 


I am not very good at ms paint so I am sure I would have never noticed. I understand now. Thank you
Second lines are hard when not much more to say



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 06:29 PM
link   
Don't know if this has been brought up..but a few things about the pictures

Interesting....

And this photo here caught my eye:

Facebook photo

Because it has a Corbis watermark on it. I guess since they are freely putting their images up on facebook it wouldn't be a stretch that they would have them on an online image database...but that stuck out as being very unusual. Along with the other poor images they are presenting (odd stretching/image ratios) it just seems very low end for such a "high end" society.

Also this image to me seems the guilderberg logo is photoshopped in (on the left hand side)

Facebo ok

will keep researching

Michelle



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 06:34 PM
link   
I wonder if this is all some study to find out how addicted to secret societies people can be and how far they would go to be a part of it. Or they are going to be the new suppliers of soylent green.



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 09:23 PM
link   
reply to post by Diplomat
 


Several months ago, after vaguely expressing interest, I was actively solicited for membership by the "Grand Master", via both LinkedIn and Facebook. Like many other readers here, I'm highly skeptical about the group, its true membership and its true objectives. I was asked to become a member and write articles on the group, and in exchange they would waive the membership fee. I cannot gain entrance to the site without either paying the fee (like that's going to happen) or publishing something on Wikipedia, I'm told, and cannot access any information without gaining entrance.

I *have* received a welcome kit similar to the one in the video, but on close examination, it is quite poor. The box in which it arrived looked as though it had been dragged through an alley, though it might have been nice at one point; the "certificate" is laser printed at relatively low resolution, not embossed, and the border images look like clipart, including the perfect ratio symbols at each corner--which are grossly out of place with the rest of the border. The paperweight is, surprisingly, solid marble, but is beaten up and badly sandblasted with the logo and the slug. The wallet is the cheapest possible leather, badly stamped with the creepy Guilderberg logo (quite possibly a rubber stamp with white or silver ink). The membership card is of the same kind of plastic as a credit card, and even embossed, but that sort of thing is incredibly easy to do. I found it comical that one of the "identifying" features on the back was a Fibonacci sequence. Two other, larger cards made of the same material, are also included, and include the same text as what we have all read all over the internet. Oh, and an appalling proportion of the content is grammatically/mechanically incorrect.

It all came packed in a heavily scented box (yuck), with the forms holding the items cut out of cheap cardboard and styrofoam covered with cheap black acetate satin. Given the price that members are supposed to pay, one might expect a kit made of higher quality materials. I wonder if anyone has actually paid that membership fee yet, and if so, whether they're simply embarrassed to come forward to admit they were scammed.

Unable to find anything substantial online other than tons of self-published press releases all containing the same content, and useless speculation about its supposed ties to the Bilderbergers and Illuminati, I now invite any existing members to come forward and contact me, if only to legitimize the claims of this organization. I will not publish any comments directly relating to activities within the group (if it is, in fact, real); however, I will also not write or publish anything--other than questions like this--in Wikipedia about a group that makes such elaborate claims without *some* substantiation. Existing images are bad, clearly (badly) edited to include some "evidence" of some tie to the organization. I continue to suspect a scam--a very elaborate hoax.

As someone else said on this forum, if they're *trying* to look like a scam to scare off potential troublemakers, they're succeeding. If they're expecting people to wade through this and still expect to join an elite inner circle, then I have a feeling those members are in for an unpleasant surprise.

I worry further that entrance to the group may actually result in personal danger to the initiate.

Someone PLEASE correct me if I'm wrong.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:03 PM
link   
It is laughable how people will come up with the most bizarre dissections and theories to rip something apart just because they aren't accepted or fit in. Not once was I hassled or solicited by either the Gradmaster or any Guilderberg member before joining. Having been a member for the past 8 years (2 of them spent inside their online manifestation) I have met some of the most interesting people and insightful human beings, who are truly inspired to make this world a better place. There are focused, dedicated, Dens to discuss business offers, art, world affairs (i.e. the excellent Guilderberg Alternative Government) and much more.

We have done more good on any given day, through our collective intelligence than a lifetime of an unenlightened Brother or Sister. I have also personally received the Guilderberg Welcome package and it was a beautiful token of appreciation and something that I cherish proudly. The materials were of the highest quality and beautifully presented, contrary to the claims made above - by a fox crying sour grapes. Do not fall into the traps of the naysayers.

“I worry further that entrance to the group may actually result in personal danger to the initiate.” This made me cringe and chuckle at the same time. Perhaps a tin foil hat will do you good. It might just help stop the blasts of energy weapons by government agents trying to control you.

"Those Who Can't Do - Criticize" - Unknown



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:38 PM
link   
reply to post by FrenchBreadBaguette
 



We have done more good on any given day, through our collective intelligence than a lifetime of an unenlightened Brother or Sister.
Curious as to why it costs money to "do good". And where was the group in the past 500 years? It claims to be that old but doesn't provide anything to say that they have been "doing good" in all that time.

Nothing to show for all the efforts?



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:06 PM
link   
reply to post by FrenchBreadBaguette
 


If this is such a great society to join...why do they photoshop their pictures, or post fake ones? If it were so great they'd have pictures of their own wonderful community events and charitable organizations they support.

By the way, how exactly did you come about joining ATS? I always find it interesting when someone joins the same day as they post a message supporting something they belong to or believe in

Michelle



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 10:04 PM
link   
reply to post by boncho
 


^^This.^^

I just stumbled onto these posts since I was also invited as a member into this group. Not ruling it out as a hoax or a fraud, but I am very skeptical, especially of the high $1,500 membership fee. Why would I pay that for an online organization when there are other groups that offer the supposedly same thing (high networth membership) that are free?

My gut says this organization is not legit. I'll tell you why.

While it is based on what the people above have posted, my reasoning is also based on the lack of information about this organization. No one brings it up. Ever. Not the NY Times. Not the Washington Post. Not the London Times, etc. You get the point. Even organizations like Skulls and Bones or the Freemasons, which are supposedly "secret societies", receive more coverage. Much more coverage.

For example, I am a member of Phi Beta Kappa, which was once considered a "secret society" on college campuses. They are just as open as this group claims to be, but PBK has strict guidelines for membership and no one from the society just randomly approaches you and says "hey, want to join?" And the organization NEVER says they are "actively recruiting new members." A person is lucky enough if they receive an invitation.

Like others have posted, I find it incredibly odd that they have to solicit for members, which apparently is what they do on their Facebook page. Truly old organizations that have survived for all of these years never do this. People pray to get accepted to Harvard, not the other way around. The same holds true for old societies.

Also, someone in this discussion posted "why haven't there been any complaints" if this society is a scam. The reason is simple, and it is the same reason no one complained when Bernie Madoff "made off" with billions of dollars before his ponzi scheme collapsed. The people who were victims of his scam did not realize they were being jipped--until it was too late. For example, say if someone puts down $1,500 to join this group. Sure, they may receive a very nice looking certificate and other accessories. Were these things worth $1,500 bucks? Probably not. But hey, it got me into an "elite" society, so why complain? Besides, even if I receive no other benefit from this, we do "good" things, so the money did not go to waste. This is the rationalization.

As far as the Kate Perry video, the answer to this question is simple. Does the MAIN music video published by Perry and her team contain these "illuminati" images. Second hand videos and other "banned" versions do NOT count. I did not see the video so I cannot comment on this. If the main music video does NOT show the clips, then this can be disregarded as a fake.
edit on 5-2-2013 by AndrewEsq because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-2-2013 by AndrewEsq because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 10:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by AndrewEsq
reply to post by boncho
 


^^This.^^

I just stumbled onto these posts since I was also invited as a member into this group. Not ruling it out as a hoax or a fraud, but I am very skeptical, especially of the high $1,500 membership fee. Why would I pay that for an online organization when there are other groups that offer the supposedly same thing (high networth membership) that are free?

My gut says this organization is not legit. I'll tell you why.

While it is based on what the people above have posted, my reasoning is also based on the lack of information about this organization. No one brings it up. Ever. Not the NY Times. Not the Washington Post. Not the London Times, etc. You get the point. Even organizations like Skulls and Bones or the Freemasons, which are supposedly "secret societies", receive more coverage. Much more coverage.

For example, I am a member of Phi Beta Kappa, which was once considered a "secret society" on college campuses. They are just as open as this group claims to be, but PBK has strict guidelines for membership and no one from the society just randomly approaches you and says "hey, want to join?" And the organization NEVER says they are "actively recruiting new members." A person is lucky enough if they receive an invitation.

Like others have posted, I find it incredibly odd that they have to solicit for members, which apparently is what they do on their Facebook page. Truly old organizations that have survived for all of these years never do this. People pray to get accepted to Harvard, not the other way around. The same holds true for old societies.

Also, someone in this discussion posted "why haven't there been any complaints" if this society is a scam. The reason is simple, and it is the same reason no one complained when Bernie Madoff "made off" with billions of dollars before his ponzi scheme collapsed. The people who were victims of his scam did not realize they were being jipped--until it was too late. For example, say if someone puts down $1,500 to join this group. Sure, they may receive a very nice looking certificate and other accessories. Were these things worth $1,500 bucks? Probably not. But hey, it got me into an "elite" society, so why complain? Besides, even if I receive no other benefit from this, we do "good" things, so the money did not go to waste. This is the rationalization.

As far as the Kate Perry video, the answer to this question is simple. Does the MAIN music video published by Perry and her team contain these "illuminati" images. Second hand videos and other "banned" versions do NOT count. I did not see the video so I cannot comment on this. If the main music video does NOT show the clips, then this can be disregarded as a fake.
edit on 5-2-2013 by AndrewEsq because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-2-2013 by AndrewEsq because: (no reason given)


I agree wholeheartedly with your assessment. Additionally, it seems like their invitations went out to quite a few for a while and then stopped. I found that odd.





new topics
top topics
 
5
<< 3  4  5   >>

log in

join