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Let's Not Forget About Other Important Family Members...

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posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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Thanks for remembering our furry companions kangareux4u.
Good info!
I have been making family preparations but guess who doesn't have extra food and medications?
They will soon thanks to your reminder




posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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Thank you for the .s up reminder. I have extra food, water, and blankets for my pup but did not think too much of a first aid kit. I even went to the level to find a way to care for stray domestic animals if I had the resources. As far as eating or killing my pup, I have children and if he runs out of food we may become food I love him dearly yet do not know how he would respond if he was starving as well. For the safety of my children if he was not able to hunt elsewhere I would have to find him food or something I can not imagine harming him in any way. He is a great hunter and scout so I guess keeping him happy would keep food on our plates provided there is any out there.

I will admit "Arial" from "Dawn of the Dead" came to my mind, when the man has to eat his companion.



posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Thanks for remembering our furry companions kangareux4u.
Good info!
I have been making family preparations but guess who doesn't have extra food and medications?
They will soon thanks to your reminder


Then the thread was absolutely worth it!
I didn't think about it until yesterday either... then felt slightly guilty that it had not crossed my mind. Better to have it and not need it than to not have it and need it.



posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by Kangaruex4EweWho's priorities are not straight? Keeping a first aid kit, food, and water for your pet in case of an emergency or disaster in no way obligates you to DIE for your pet.


I am having a hard time understanding this idea coming from left field. I think most folks would eat whatever animal they could if they were starving, however in my OP it stated to stock their food as you stocked your own. So hopefully no one will have to eat a pet...

This went from 0 to 60 in record time.


Every thread in which people discuss concern for animals with regard to preparation and or disaster preparedness or those with stories about animal survival after such an event (like recent Japan issues) stimulates a "What about the people?" response.

For some odd reason there are those who believe that posting about concern for animals and their welfare implies that you do not care about humans and put the needs of animals above those of man. I don't see the two as mutually exclusive but for some you need to put in the "I care about humans too" disclaimer even though the discussion is not about the issue of humans and their survival at all.

I think it makes people feel superior on some level to swoop in and claim that they care about people more than animals.

Anyway to drive on with the topic which is preparing for your pets to survive a disaster...not how little we care about people.

IMO as a dairyman regarding my four footed assistants I will be keeping them alive as long as possible because they make my job a lot easier moving the herd in and out of the milking shed twice a day - it would take me twice as long to accomplish this without them. If you have ever tried to get a 1500lb Holstein to do what you want you will know it’s a mix of asking, begging and demanding...

Dogs are (and have been for some thousands of years) a tool; and while my wife’s ankle biters might not be representative - they are all natural hunters in some measure.

My larger dogs are herders and are pretty good at that and they are great watch dogs and if need be they can flush game and such for me. They might just be content or something but they hardly ever kill anything on the farm - they killed a coyote once that got too close but didn't eat it. They are too slow for squirrels it seems or they are just not trying hard I don't know.

However, the little "rat dogs" as I call the two smaller ones I think if left to their own devices could sustain themselves on the mice they catch - I see them killing mice all day long every day. They eat most of them as well so even they have some utility.

I have a large stash of veterinary medicines on hand from sedatives to euthanasia to bandages and ointments. I buy dog food in bulk from the farm supply catalog so I have from 60-90 days of dry on hand at all times and if I have to kill off cattle such as in a total SHTF scenario (I can't hand milk 25 cows a day with two adults.) I think I will have plenty of leftovers to go around for a while anyway.

While it would break my heart to do so I would not let the animals suffer – any of them and I have responsibility for about 150 lives of various types on my farm. I would deal with them humanely but I would not waste their lives either – the cattle I would have to cull alone would feed many people for a long time.



posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by Golf66

Every thread in which people discuss concern for animals with regard to preparation and or disaster preparedness or those with stories about animal survival after such an event (like recent Japan issues) stimulates a "What about the people?" response.

For some odd reason there are those who believe that posting about concern for animals and their welfare implies that you do not care about humans and put the needs of animals above those of man. I don't see the two as mutually exclusive but for some you need to put in the "I care about humans too" disclaimer even though the discussion is not about the issue of humans and their survival at all.

I think it makes people feel superior on some level to swoop in and claim that they care about people more than animals.


And this ^^^^ is the reason I find myself starring most of your posts.
Well, that and your tiny dancing avatar...


I think you are correct. I come from the line of thinking that when your children are sick you take them to the doctor. When the animal "YOU" chose to bring into your family gets sick, you should do the same. An animal's life is not more valuable than a human's by any means, but they are living, breathing, creatures that feel pain. Caring for one properly does not signify choosing pets over humans. As you said, one has naught to do with the other.


Anyway to drive on with the topic which is preparing for your pets to survive a disaster...not how little we care about people.

IMO as a dairyman regarding my four footed assistants I will be keeping them alive as long as possible because they make my job a lot easier moving the herd in and out of the milking shed twice a day - it would take me twice as long to accomplish this without them. If you have ever tried to get a 1500lb Holstein to do what you want you will know it’s a mix of asking, begging and demanding...

Dogs are (and have been for some thousands of years) a tool; and while my wife’s ankle biters might not be representative - they are all natural hunters in some measure.

My larger dogs are herders and are pretty good at that and they are great watch dogs and if need be they can flush game and such for me. They might just be content or something but they hardly ever kill anything on the farm - they killed a coyote once that got too close but didn't eat it. They are too slow for squirrels it seems or they are just not trying hard I don't know.


Ahhh. I love herder breeds. Your personal experience is a winning argument for reasons to try and keep your animals alive and healthy. Even though they do not speak per se, they are contributing skills that make your job easier. You can't hardly push a cow half an inch, but those dogs get them moving with very little effort.


However, the little "rat dogs" as I call the two smaller ones I think if left to their own devices could sustain themselves on the mice they catch - I see them killing mice all day long every day. They eat most of them as well so even they have some utility.


Again.. you have explained another positive to keeping your dogs alive and healthy. Mice carry some pretty nasty diseases and breed faster than rabbits. Without your dogs you could have a mass infestation and possible milk/animal cross contamination. So even if there were a SHTF scenario, you would remain one step a. with fresh supplies of clean milk to drink and a heap of untainted meat.

IMO, every animal has a purpose. The "Circle Of Life" depends on the survival of every species. Once a species is removed from that circle, other species are either lucky enough to adapt or they suffer from the loss causing a chain reaction throughout the spectrum. It is beneficial to try and preserve every species if at all possible.


I have a large stash of veterinary medicines on hand from sedatives to euthanasia to bandages and ointments. I buy dog food in bulk from the farm supply catalog so I have from 60-90 days of dry on hand at all times and if I have to kill off cattle such as in a total SHTF scenario (I can't hand milk 25 cows a day with two adults.) I think I will have plenty of leftovers to go around for a while anyway.

While it would break my heart to do so I would not let the animals suffer – any of them and I have responsibility for about 150 lives of various types on my farm. I would deal with them humanely but I would not waste their lives either – the cattle I would have to cull alone would feed many people for a long time.


I agree. They don't deserve to suffer any more than we do unnecessarily. I have had to put animals down before and it is heartbreaking. Making them suffer longer than needed because we are too selfish to let them go is just plain cruel.

Thanks for posting golf...
You always seem to bring logic to any subject you discuss.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 08:50 AM
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Thanks for posting this thread!
It's excellent because I hadn't thought about first aid for my dog. Had thought about food supply though...Still wondering how a long term need would go. She is a husky, and loves to stalk prey, so she probably would be living a dream. But really, thanks, hadn't thought from that perspective, just assumed I'd take the doggy and whatever food for her we had and go.

Dogs are also excellent for helping with work, so when rebuilding a new permanent camp site, I would be truly fortunate to have my husky around.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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I agree to put in a supply for pets, but only essential ones. Dogs are great for security, cats are great for mice control, but after that, I'm eating them.



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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I am not worried about feeding my cat in a SHTF scenario really. Hes a cat, he can find his own food easy



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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how can people forget their families and pets it is an out rage that they do
get a life people you need to prepare to help the helpless and help the helpless now



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Animals aka cats and dogs are not helpless, they have hair,claws and they play...which to them is actually practicing for the hunt and kill of food...
I could see a dog or 2 for security,a cat is worthless to me...well ok its not... we are eating chineese till they are gone.
I grew up on a farm, we ate my pet pig when I was 10...you know what I said to dad?...man he tastes good...I fed him right.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 01:34 AM
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Originally posted by LastStand
reply to post by Kangaruex4Ewe
 


I am just saying for the record...the pet is an emergency food! Plain and simple. This is how it has been since the beginning of time. The pet is a means to find food in an emergency. When the "pet" cannot earn it's keep it gets eaten. Simple rule of survival. This is a survival thread no?...Not an Emergency preparedness thread. You want emergency preparedness then maybe the FEMA site is more up your alley. Survival (which...lemme check...yup that's the title of this forum...) is brutal. Not humane, not nice, not civil...Get real.
edit on 4/17/2011 by LastStand because: (no reason given)




unless you really have crap luck, shouldn't even come to to point of eating a pet, learn edible plants, learn to fish, hunt, trap, a dog could even help with that



posted on Dec, 22 2011 @ 05:52 AM
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reply to post by Kangaruex4Ewe



XMAS CAKE, MINCE PIES, XMAS PUDDING CONTAIN RAISINS & SULTANAS WHICH ARE LETHAL TO CATS & DOGS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dear four legged friends and their carers,

Christmas and New Year is a time for everyone to get together and to relax and
enjoy the festivities. However I would strongly advise all pets from over indulging.
Below I have listed some of the temptations. Four legged friends have an
incredible sense of smell especially when it comes to food, human nibbles and
leftovers such as turkey and ham and I know their detection, unwrapping and
climbing skills have no bounds when tasty food is involved!

Chocolate- There is generally an abundance of chocolate at Christmas from
biscuits and Christmas decorations - great slabs of it (especially with the offers in
the Supermarkets where your carers shop). It looks lovely and smells fantastic
but should be avoided. Chocolate contains theobromine which can affect the
hearts and nervous systems of four legged friends. It is especially concentrated in
dark chocolate or cooking chocolate. If eaten it can cause panting, shaking,
vomiting and diarrhea and even fits and can be fatal.

Raisins and sultanas- These are the main ingredient of Christmas pudding, mince
pies and Christmas cake. These can prove fatal if eaten by dogs and cats. I myself
have treated several cases of animals that have eaten raisins with one dog nearly
dying from eating just a few of them!

Nuts- There are many varieties around especially at Christmas time for our human
carers to nibble on! Not on the menu for dogs and cats! They can cause blockages
and severe stomach problems, hallucinations and occasionally convulsions especially
when eaten without being chewed in large numbers.

Poinsettia- These green and red plants are often associated with Christmas. They
are especially toxic to cats so I would suggest that cats and dogs alike avoid
having a quick snack on the leaves as they can cause burns in the mouth, vomiting,
diarrhoea and a really nasty stomach upset. Lillies- These flowers can,
unfortunately, be fatal especially to cats. The whole flower including the pollen is
toxic and often cats brush past the flowers and get the pollen on their coats.
Cats, being cats, do clean themselves at regular intervals thus ingesting the pollen.
Holly, Ivy and Mistletoe- None of these are not recommended on the menu. All
can cause upset stomachs, vomiting, diarrhoea and in rabbits paralysis and
convulsions.

Foreign bodies- Tinsel, baubles, wrapping paper, silica gel sachets( found in
packaging for cameras, handbags and shoes) and the Christmas decorations should
not be included on the diet or entertainment sheet for four legged friends. Cats
especially love to play with the dangling tinsel and it is very easily eaten. Such
items are not easily digested and can cause a blockage which can lead to problems
that may warrant surgery. My advice would be stick to the regular diet!

Electrocution- Christmas lights especially on the Christmas tree mean that not
only can cats test their mountaineering skills but there is often additional cabling
lying around. The younger generation of pets especially find these very tempting
as a play thing, often they pull at them or start chewing. Unfortunately this can be
fatal as electricity and chewing and wet mouths can have fatal consequences. Get
your owners to try to avoid leaving them in tempting positions and to ensure the
Christmas tree is secure to avoid the attendance of ‘mountain rescue’ for the cats
that get stuck up them.

Other considerations- Santa has been in touch via e mail and told me it is likely to
be a cold and possibly white Christmas so hopefully visitors will remember to close
doors when they come in and out and upset your daily routine of eat, snooze, eat
with a short time of exercise and you being shut out if you do wake up for visitors!
Remember that humans often have a little ‘tipple’ over Christmas and may be a bit
wobbly so best to avoid walking too close and getting stepped on or them landing
on you if they ‘wobble over’! Please remember pets kept outside will need lots of
extra bedding and heating and access to unfrozen water to drink. Please do not
use boiling water to refill dishes as this can crack and freeze quickly. Garden birds
will appreciate leftover Christmas scraps and fresh water as well but remember
four legged friends the scraps are not for you to ‘hoover’ up bits that fall off!
For those careers and owners that do venture out remind them that the
Antifreeze is for their car to avoid it freezing and should not be left out handy
for us to drink as even though it may be sweet tasting it is highly toxic and even a
small amount can prove lethal.

Not trying to frighten you all but do be careful and make sure you have a safe and
restful Christmas season.






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