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Man Gets Arrested For Making Joke In New York City

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posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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Originally posted by areyouserious2010
reply to post by FEDec
 


So then tell me why, if the guy arrested was clearly in the wrong, is it the police officer's fault he did not let it go?

For some reason some people find it unfathomable to be accountable for their own actions nowadays. "Its not my fault I was clearly acting like an idiot on the street that day." "It is the police officer's fault for making me act that way and get arrested." "It is the government's fault for passing the laws that I break."

I can understand that some of you are making the legitimate argument for the rights of people. I applaud your efforts. But, there is a certain element that uses the same argument as an excuse to act rediculously and push the blame on others.


Is idiocy a legitimate reason for arrest?

Also I did not say that the joker was clearly in the wrong. Go back and reread.

same old attitude "I do no wrong so those accused of doing wrong must be wrong". You and those like you are why trial by media exists.
edit on 16-4-2011 by FEDec because: Had more




posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 10:50 PM
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I watched this earlier and im really shocked by this.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by FEDec

Originally posted by areyouserious2010
reply to post by FEDec
 


So then tell me why, if the guy arrested was clearly in the wrong, is it the police officer's fault he did not let it go?

For some reason some people find it unfathomable to be accountable for their own actions nowadays. "Its not my fault I was clearly acting like an idiot on the street that day." "It is the police officer's fault for making me act that way and get arrested." "It is the government's fault for passing the laws that I break."

I can understand that some of you are making the legitimate argument for the rights of people. I applaud your efforts. But, there is a certain element that uses the same argument as an excuse to act rediculously and push the blame on others.


Is idiocy a legitimate reason for arrest?


Well, that's the $60,000 question, isn't it? What law exactly did this fellow break?

The police apologists (read: SLAVES) can't answer that.

Let's just cut to the chase here. What do we have?

A guy on a bicycle gets stopped for riding on the sidewalk. That's fine, I suppose. A bit laughable, but hey, it's a slow policing day in New York and these cops have a few minutes to kill, so off they go to stop a bicyclist from possibly brushing up against an old woman on the sidewalk. God help us all.

In the process of dealing with this vicious bicyclist offender, some loudmouth gives them a few words. What do the police do? Well, they could have ignored him. They could have just been men and let it go... but no...

They.... Arrest him? And this is America?

I mean, this is a complete joke. For those of you at home trying to keep score, here's the latest:

POLICE STATE: 1
AMERICANS: 0

YOU LOSE.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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thats absolute bull excrement hope the cops get fired and charged . same thing happens in aus but unlike in america it is now illegal for us to video tape a police officer in the course of his or her duty which of course is just another civil libert that has been removed for the benifit of TPBT such as the right to bear arms and the right to choose wether to vote or not ( its compulsory in aus) . prepare for fascism people its on its way



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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A few questions to consider for apologists.

1) Does this arrest affect the community positively?

2) Was this arrest necessary for immediate safety reasons?

If yes please state the positive affect and how safety was increased.

If no:

3) did these police serve the community or themselves with their actions?



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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i remember i was playing in the parking lot and a cop pulled over and asked me my name and checked his database. maybe he was asking for id to see if there were any warrants

this should have never occured. but the guy should not have resisted once the cuffs were on him

and i would have laughed my butt off if the battery died on the camera or he lost his memory card



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by JRCrowley
 


New York State Penal Law section 240.20 Disorderly Conduct

Disorderly Conduct

I would say the officer had probable cause if you read the law.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by watchitburn
arrested for being black on a friday night.

2nd line


Normally, I would agree but the cop who first got out and appeared to initiate this whole debacle was also black.
Nevertheless, I hope this video goes mega-viral and puts the spotlight on a mentality that needs to be kept in check in our police force. The guy wasn't breaking any laws and wasn't posing a threat. When a cop uses ego, professionalism goes out the window.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by areyouserious2010
 


I agree with you about one thing you said. I think police officers who abuse their power should not just get disciplied on the job; they should have their day in court for any and all crimes they commit in the name of their badge. That would go a long way to cleaning up this kind of abuse of citizens.

At no time did the jokster present a threat to these goons. He does not have to move along as ordered by a police officer. He does not belong to the police officer; he's not the police officer's property. He is allowed to stay and watch what the police officers are doing. He was not interfering in their work which was supposed to be writing a ticket to a bicyclist. Police need to do their job by the law and move on like normal people would do. The police esclated nothing into something becasue the guy made them mad. They had no right to get angry.

You can argue for police abuse all you want, but it won't help you when you lose the support and respect of the public. Whether you want to admit it or not, the public has a civic agreement of trust with police officers in America. When that trust is broken and people no longer respect officers as honorable people, the game is over. Police will have something to whine about in short order. And it won't be a jokster they are whining about. It will look more like Mexico with crooked cops and cops on hit lists. We, as a society are not there yet and mainly because we had a constitutional government where citizens had rights; and police officers protected those rights and citizens trusted that the police officers would do so.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by FEDec
 


Your qualifications for the arrest have no bearing because the officer clearly stated his intent to issue a criminal citation. The man refused to be positively identified. Without being positively identified, no criminal citation could be issued so he had to be arrested.

Plain and simple.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:11 PM
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The saddest part of this thread is knowing their are a handful of sheep on ATS who think the jokester should have shown his ID. This is blatant mindcontrol and the people who support this BS is locked in their own prison matrix. It is so sad to see humans bow down to the Nazi StormTroopers. This cop should be thrown off the force but we all know that will not happen until the people stand up and make these Nazi bastards pay and pay dearly.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by areyouserious2010
reply to post by JRCrowley
 


New York State Penal Law section 240.20 Disorderly Conduct

Disorderly Conduct

I would say the officer had probable cause if you read the law.


Linking to text does not ensure that you yourself understand why or why not the law applies to this situation.

Why does this apply to the particular situation? Otherwise it is just your unknown interpretation V. our unknown interpretation.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by JRCrowley
 


It doesnt matter what you find laughable, the police were enforcing the law. Most laws are passed for a reason, meaning there are events that lead up to people lobbying for laws to be passed.

Obviously, riding a bicycle poses a public safety risk in New York City. The officers found someone breaking that law and stopped him to enforce it.

If you read the New York State Law on disorderly conduct, the officer had probable cause.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by OrphenFire
 


Thank You friend. If you have more tips please share them.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by FEDec
 


When one is arrested they are charged and go before a judicial officer to establish if they have probable cause. The judicial officer reads the events that took place and the "letter" of the law. If the events that took place match the "letter" of the law then there is probable cause.

Will he be found guilty? Will he be thrown in jail? Probably not but that is up to a judge.

The actions of the police are not to punish people. They are to charge people with a crime, remove them from the public if a threat to public safety and reasonably ensure their appearance in court.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by areyouserious2010
reply to post by FEDec
 


Your qualifications for the arrest have no bearing because the officer clearly stated his intent to issue a criminal citation. The man refused to be positively identified. Without being positively identified, no criminal citation could be issued so he had to be arrested.

Plain and simple.


The citation in the first place was subject to some heavy interpretation. The qualifications I outlined don't need to exist within the legal realm whatsoever.

The questions I asked were to ascertain if the stated purpose of the police is different from the observed purpose of the police.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by NWOnoworldorder
 


You seem to have missed the part where the cops didn't have any right to ask for the ID in the first place. They had no reason to tell the guy to move on either.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by sara123123
 


Lets get one thing straight, we all agree that the bad cops should not be cops and if they commit crimes then they should be charged like any other criminal.

To break the law one does not have to pose a threat to anyone. You are absolutely correct, he did not have to move along. Again, you are correct to say he is not the property of the police officer. But under New York State law he was obligated to stop being disorderly which he failed to do. I disagree that he was not interfereing as clearly he was.

The problems in Mexico have no bearing on this subject. Although, Mexico does have a constitution just like we do. The problem there is that the economy is terrible and the job of police officer is viewed more as a money making venture then criminal justice or civic service. Although not an excuse by any means, low police pay contributes to them being susceptible to corruption by the very wealthy drug cartels.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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Apparently he was charged with harassment, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. I did read some of people's responses justifying the police's actions but honestly I am not still not convinced. It is clearly the police abusing and exploiting their position in power. Too much ego to just ignore any passerby comments. I would understand if the guy stopped and was trying to interfere but he was just moving along. If I remember reading somewhere that police officers are TRAINED to ignore angry comments towards them. Because then if the comments get personal then it will be a personal fight between the two parties. And the cop will always win because they have position of power.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by NWOnoworldorder
thats how it works here in the uk....


And there we go. Just because UK has become a facist wonderland doesn't make the rest of the world so. Cops absolutely have no right to ask anyone they wan't for ID.




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