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Is Long Valley Supervolcano Activating? Swarm Just started

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posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by MrSmokeydogg7
 


We are veteran quake watchers - since mid-90s and live about 50 miles from Hawthorne- so we have been staying on top of it.

Note that the quakes are increasing in strength. Someone asked if it could be from mining. There is a cluster of mines there - but most are dormant. Some is gold- but most is uranium. (you can get mine kml's from google community to show up on google earth that shows all old and new mines)
So they would not be doing blowing and anyway, if the quakes were from dynamiting they would still be only 1.2- 2 in strength.

Seeing as it is partly an old uranium mine area - with a massive ancient lava flow field just to the south-west of the current swarm, of I would say it is probably gassing being forced through old cavities. That would indicate fresh geothermal activity. If you go on Google earth and look at the quake swarm- then a bit south-west to the ghost town of Aurora (cool place) you can see a lava mound just to the north of it. It's not labeled a volcano, nor are many of our old volcanoes, because people don't give a # about Nevada in general. Then look just to the west of the quake swarm and you will see a massive lava flow field.

Long Valley in Cali is south of Mono Lake- that may be connected to these old fields in Nevada - but I think Nv has enough geothermal activity on it's own without having to borrow from Cali.




posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:25 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


where's information and data on Long Valley Supervolcano and how it relates, being it was your thread title



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


because the thread is being derailed intentionally.

there must be something to this.

My guess is underground bunker production, if there is a magma chamber under there, it wouldn't take much to hollow out a bunker, just blast around the edges
edit on 16-4-2011 by BadBoYeed because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:33 AM
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according to LVO level is at green


LONG VALLEY OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
Friday, April 15, 2011 2:16 PM PDT (Friday, April 15, 2011 21:16 UTC)


LONG VALLEY VOLCANIC CENTER VOLCANO (CAVW #1203-14-)
37°42' N 118°52'12" W, Summit Elevation 7231 ft (2204 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Twelve small earthquakes between magnitude 1.0 and 2.3 occurred in the Long Valley region since the last update on April 8, 2011. All of these events occurred in the Sierra Nevada block south of the caldera.


LVO
edit on 16-4-2011 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by BadBoYeed
My guess is underground bunker production, if there is a magma chamber under there, it wouldn't take much to hollow out a bunker, just blast around the edges[


Ummm why would you build a bunker in a magma chamber close to a major fault and super volcano?



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by Krzyzmo



The Nevada quake swarm is pictured on a California-Nevada map by the USGS with the Long Valley super-volcano caldera at Mammoth Lakes pictured near the lower center. As can be seen from the map, the Nevada quakes are not erupting along any previously known fault lines which means this could be some seismic activity related to movement of magma within the caldera of the Long Valley volcano. The Long Valley volcano map gives a comprehensive view of the radius of the caldera and puts it within the range of the current Nevada quake swarm.





Word Press


That is not the Long Valley. That massive area is the ash fall zone from the last few major eruptions and potential ash hazards from the USGS site here.
USGS TEPHRA MAP

The Long Valley caldera is much smaller than that and located just south of Mono Lake in Cali.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


because i like to live on the edge.



who knows. They probably already know that it'll be safe and inactive for a while....or They could have redirected the magma. tube, who knows...i'm just spitballin here...



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by BadBoYeed
reply to post by zorgon
 


because i like to live on the edge.



who knows. They probably already know that it'll be safe and inactive for a while....or They could have redirected the magma. tube, who knows...i'm just spitballin here...


Clearly... I vote for letting those knowledgeable on the subject speak on this fairly significant topic instead of adding random, completely ungrounded comments that bring nothing new to the table and distract from the meat of the discussion. "..They could have redirected magma.."? lol...Please stop. Open discussions are cool, but only when the discussion is going in a founded direction. Please resist the urge to post for the sake of posting and let these guys do their thing.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:59 AM
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Originally posted by violet
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


where's information and data on Long Valley Supervolcano and how it relates, being it was your thread title

Check my posts. Get the google earth and quake KML to see where the Long Valley Caldera is compared to the Hawthorne NV swarm.

And look carefully at the area around the swarm in NV. You will see lava outflow areas, lava mounds, volcanoes and vents right around the swarm.
Just because the lava / volcanic areas in NV are not as 'advertised' as the California ones does not mean there is not massive geothermal activity happening on the NV side of the border.
Nevada is #1 in geothermal energy production of all states in the U.S.

Seems like Cali needs to name every tree and stick. NV doesn't get as much attention or labels because it is much less populated.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:10 AM
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Originally posted by Stratus9

Originally posted by Krzyzmo



The Nevada quake swarm is pictured on a California-Nevada map by the USGS with the Long Valley super-volcano caldera at Mammoth Lakes pictured near the lower center. As can be seen from the map, the Nevada quakes are not erupting along any previously known fault lines which means this could be some seismic activity related to movement of magma within the caldera of the Long Valley volcano. The Long Valley volcano map gives a comprehensive view of the radius of the caldera and puts it within the range of the current Nevada quake swarm.





Word Press


That is not the Long Valley. That massive area is the ash fall zone from the last few major eruptions and potential ash hazards from the USGS site here.
USGS TEPHRA MAP

The Long Valley caldera is much smaller than that and located just south of Mono Lake in Cali.


PLEASE read Something About the Long Valley Caldera - Harmonic Tremors? to understand WHY they call it LONG VALLEY CALDERA SYSTEM

The VALLEY is LONG.... indicative of rift vulcanism

Caldera System..... indicative of a complex system involving multiple calderas

Noteworthy about Long Valley is that the Caldera systems all have marched northwards as geologic time progressed. The more northward the erruptions occurred the less powerful they became...Markleeville would have made a logical new location.

Hawthorne however is a bit odd in that instead of the steady northward march we're now reverting back to the main caldera, which could be indicative of a larger than usual erruption, VEI 6 perhaps.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:24 AM
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Originally posted by ANNED
This swarm is outside of the caldera and well away from the geothermal area.

This swarm is in the White Mountains about 30 KM east of the eastern edge of the caldera.

I have spent a lot of time in the area over the years soaking in the hot springs of the caldera.
en.wikipedia.org...


The Nevada Swarm is 39 miles NORTHEAST of Long Valley Cald. - and as I have stated in other posts, is in the midst of it's own ancient volcanic area. Pull up Google Earth and look at the old flows and mounds.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:28 AM
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Here's a full article on the activity titled "Swarm of Quakes have Experts Concerned" from KRNV Reno News 4:


Swarm of Quakes have Experts Concerned Page Last Updated: Friday April 15, 2011 10:09am PDT Nevada Seismologists are keeping a close eye on an area southwest of Hawthorne, Nevada where hundreds of earthquakes have been detected since Sunday. " It's a little bit concerning in a sense.. The largest earthquakes in these sequences are pretty large in size." Graham Kent is Director of Nevada Seismological Laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno. He says there have been hundreds of earthquakes southwest of Hawthorne over the past few days. The largest-- recorded at a 4.4 in size. "These are the biggest in a sequence we've seen at least in the last couple of years." Kent says unlike the 2008 quakes in Somersett that damaged so many homes, these earthquakes are fortunately not underneath a community. Size is not the only reason Kent says they are watching the swarm of quakes closely. The location of these quakes is on top of a fault that has until now remained unknown or has not been active. Kent then made an eerie comparison, "Whats really interesting about most of these earthquakes we've experienced. Short of the Chilean and Japanese; Haiti, Baha, even Christchurch.. Were on unknown faults. But Kent says just because those devastating quakes happened on un-named faults does not mean that the series of quakes near Hawthorne will lead to a big quake there. Reno, Carson City and the Las Vegas valley all lie on top of fault lines. And right now, there is no way to predict where the next big quake will occur. "That's yet another reason why you don't want to look at the map and go phew, I'm safe. We're in earthquake country and so we have to be prepared. Story by: Brooke Boone bboone@mynews4.com


Source:KRNV Reno My News 4



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:28 AM
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edit on 16-4-2011 by kubacs because: Posted same piece twice in error.



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by PuterMan
reply to post by kro32
 


Sorted for the night



I'm away to my bed as it is late here!


Puterman, haaahaaaaaaa,
second line still Lmao!!!!
I love ya man!



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by Heyyo_yoyo

Originally posted by Stratus9

Originally posted by Krzyzmo



The Nevada quake swarm is pictured on a California-Nevada map by the USGS with the Long Valley super-volcano caldera at Mammoth Lakes pictured near the lower center. As can be seen from the map, the Nevada quakes are not erupting along any previously known fault lines which means this could be some seismic activity related to movement of magma within the caldera of the Long Valley volcano. The Long Valley volcano map gives a comprehensive view of the radius of the caldera and puts it within the range of the current Nevada quake swarm.




Word Press


That is not the Long Valley. That massive area is the ash fall zone from the last few major eruptions and potential ash hazards from the USGS site here.
USGS TEPHRA MAP

The Long Valley caldera is much smaller than that and located just south of Mono Lake in Cali.


PLEASE read Something About the Long Valley Caldera - Harmonic Tremors? to understand WHY they call it LONG VALLEY CALDERA SYSTEM

The VALLEY is LONG.... indicative of rift vulcanism

Caldera System..... indicative of a complex system involving multiple calderas

Noteworthy about Long Valley is that the Caldera systems all have marched northwards as geologic time progressed. The more northward the erruptions occurred the less powerful they became...Markleeville would have made a logical new location.

Hawthorne however is a bit odd in that instead of the steady northward march we're now reverting back to the main caldera, which could be indicative of a larger than usual erruption, VEI 6 perhaps.




I have hiked across the LV Caldera. I live 50 miles from Hawthorne. Believe me - I study the area more in depth than most.

What was posted on that image was the USGS Tephra (ash) fallout zone from past events- not the LV Caldera area itself. The Caldera is about 23 miles across.

Posting the Ash fallout zone map appears to be a bit of fear mongering on the posters part.
LONG VALLEY CALDERA MAP -TOPO-COORDS AND SIZE

edit on 16-4-2011 by Stratus9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 03:47 AM
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Originally posted by Stratus9
What was posted on that image was the USGS Tephra (ash) fallout zone from past events- not the LV Caldera area itself. The Caldera is about 23 miles across.





Quakes are here (box) near Mud Springs Volcano and Aurora Crater






edit on 16-4-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 03:56 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


This anywhere near area 51?

They do lots of under and above ground nuke testing (or other weapons) there...they'd cause seismic anomalies wouldn't they?



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 04:03 AM
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Originally posted by spikey
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


This anywhere near area 51?

They do lots of under and above ground nuke testing (or other weapons) there...they'd cause seismic anomalies wouldn't they?




it's not really near it



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 04:24 AM
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To my fellow Vegas-ATS'ers, this is a thread worthy of keeping an eye on. Despite the fact that Las Vegas is 318 miles south of Hawthorne, our valley could potentially be greatly affected by any seismic activity within the state. In my course of my work I've had to do some investigation in the likelihood of an earthquake in the Vegas area. I created a mock scenario where the Frenchman Mountain fault became active - locally known as Sunrise Mountain.

If you've lived here long enough some of you may remember the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake. It was 7.1 in the Mojave Desert but it sure shook up Vegas. I remember seeing the dryboard walls of my apartment rippling like water.

To my surprise I found that several scenarios were already researched by University of Reno using FEMA's HAZUS-MH loss-estimation model. You'll see from reading the PDF that NV is an extremely active earthquake region. If Vegas were to ever get hit by a big bad earthquake, it would be bad all around.

Las Vegas is built on liquefiable soils. One good shake and we'd be sitting in a red sloshy dirt. The link has a Liquefaction Hazard Map. Chances are you're probably living in one of the marked areas.

And lastly, to really throw you for a loop. We get very little power from Hoover Dam (>30%). Most of our power comes from gas powered power plants located around the borders of Vegas. And coincidentally, one of the bigger power plants, sits right at the base of Sunrise Mountain.

Just thought I'd share my findings with you. Oh, and TA, keep posting because it's your enthusiasm and passion that keeps me coming back to ATS. Plus, I imagine you look like your avatar who reminds me of Neo from the Matrix. Who doesn't trust Neo??!



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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Read the history of Nevada earthquakes. As states go it's one of the most seismically active. They get swarms like most areas from time to time.

Big blasts of volcanoes rarely come from earthquakes or give any warning really. But if your worried, feel free to catch a plane to Hawaii.... No don't they're having them there too!
edit on 16-4-2011 by daggyz because: (no reason given)




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