Inside info on comet Elenin (yes, you're being lied to)

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posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


I want some of what you're smoking. *smile* Thanks for some reality.

Reality is enough for me other than a kind buzz, so I don't need to dream up some goofy story to get noticed. I never understood the infatuation of eminent doom, does it make people feel important or something?

Here's how you can get a real feeling of importance, find your calling, study long and hard to nurture it, get a real job where you can use your knowledge and experience to help solve problems, *instead of loafing and making ones*.

I know its hard and long and maybe sometimes mundane and boring, but spewing out fantasies is a total waste of time, that here is finite, chop chop!




posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by FlyInTheOintment

Have NASA (or anyone) released a good image of the comet? I've been dipping in and out of the threads, but I have yet to see an image, and I would be most surprised if the PTB don't have one. If it had been cleared up to anyone's satisfaction, surely the topic would have died off a bit by now???


There are plenty of photos available. Here's a page with a bunch.


Originally posted by FlyInTheOintment
If this comet is the 'wimp' NASA claims it to be, then surely releasing a picture with coordinates and current distance would be acceptable, if only to dispel the conspiracy theories? Then we (an informal fraternity of ATS'ers) could club together, buy a great telescope, and have a look for ourselves.


You can generate ephemeris from the JPL Horizons web site. They've calculated the orbit and can tell you right were its going to be any given point. If you'd perfer to calculate your own orbit, the Minor Planet Center (the official branch of the International Astronomical Union that deals with cataloging small bodies) has the list of observations of the comet's position, compiled from observations by professional and amateur astronomers.

There's nothing "off" about Elenin.



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 09:10 PM
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Have NASA (or anyone) released a good image of the comet? I've been dipping in and out of the threads, but I have yet to see an image, and I would be most surprised if the PTB don't have one. If it had been cleared up to anyone's satisfaction, surely the topic would have died off a bit by now???


Its because its very small and very far away and basically inconsequential to anything. Its not even a red herring.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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Several studies have claimed to have found periodic variations, with the probability of giant impacts increasing and decreasing in a regular pattern. Now a new analysis by Coryn Bailer-Jones from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), published in the Monthly Notes of the Royal Astronomical Society, shows those simple periodic patterns to be statistical artifacts. His results indicate either that Earth is as likely to suffer a major impact now as it was in the past, or that there has been a slight increase impact rate events over the past 250 million years.

[One] proposal posits the existence of an as-yet undetected companion star to the Sun, dubbed "Nemesis." Its highly elongated orbit, the reasoning goes, would periodically bring Nemesis closer to the Oort cloud, again triggering an increase in the number of comets setting course for Earth. Bailer-Jones chose an alternative way of evaluating probabilities ("Bayesian statistics"), which avoids many of the pitfalls that hamper the traditional analysis of impact crater data. He found that simple periodic variations can be confidently ruled out. Instead, there is a general trend: From about 250 million years ago to the present, the impact rate, as judged by the number of craters of different ages, increases steadily.


Source



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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I would like to announce to the ATS community that I will be personally sitting in on an official observation of Elenin this October during its approach to Earth. I work for an astronomy professor who is funded by NASA's Goddard institute. They have purchased time on an instrument at the Keck Observatory to take images of the comet. My professor's field of specialty is comet science. She and a collaborator who works directly for Goddard will be running the show for 3-4 nights.

I'll be spending a weekend in a lab overnight experiencing first-hand how professional astronomers handle a real telescope, and I'll get to see images of Elenin in real time. I'm pretty excited for the opportunity, and I'm looking forward to keeping you all posted as to my experiences.
edit on 2-8-2011 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by AshOnMyTomatoes
 

Dress warm. Keep your O2 tank handy.
Congratulations!



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:10 PM
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NASA is worried that comet elenin will hit, (yes, physically collide with), the International Space Station


That's where i stopped reading. The chance of such an event happening is ZERO. The chance of a comet hitting earth is already incredible small, let alone of a tiny space station rotating around earth.

You could as well be playing the lottery and win the jackpot 10 times in a row.

Furthermore, the notion is absurd that NASA would be concerned a comet hitting the ISS, if it *were* so close we had a WHOLE bunch of other problems.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes
I would like to announce to the ATS community that I will be personally sitting in on an official observation of Elenin this October during its approach to Earth. I work for an astronomy professor who is funded by NASA's Goddard institute. They have purchased time on an instrument at the Keck Observatory to take images of the comet. My professor's field of specialty is comet science. She and a collaborator who works directly for Goddard will be running the show for 3-4 nights.

I'll be spending a weekend in a lab overnight experiencing first-hand how professional astronomers handle a real telescope, and I'll get to see images of Elenin in real time. I'm pretty excited for the opportunity, and I'm looking forward to keeping you all posted as to my experiences.
edit on 2-8-2011 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)


That's cool, maybe he should start teaching you that it is indeed not on an "approach to Earth".

(Sorry..not meant in a bad way. I approve and welcome if people have a interest in those things as opposed to just reading all that crap on the internet from "channellers" etc. Consider yourself lucky, i think this is very cool
)
edit on 2-8-2011 by flexy123 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes
I would like to announce to the ATS community that I will be personally sitting in on an official observation of Elenin this October during its approach to Earth. I work for an astronomy professor who is funded by NASA's Goddard institute. They have purchased time on an instrument at the Keck Observatory to take images of the comet. My professor's field of specialty is comet science. She and a collaborator who works directly for Goddard will be running the show for 3-4 nights.

I'll be spending a weekend in a lab overnight experiencing first-hand how professional astronomers handle a real telescope, and I'll get to see images of Elenin in real time. I'm pretty excited for the opportunity, and I'm looking forward to keeping you all posted as to my experiences.
edit on 2-8-2011 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)


Then jealously rears it's ugly head. Meaning me!. I'd love to have your job, if only for those few days. Please bring back pics if you can.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by flexy123
 


yes, i'm aware. that part puzzled me too. there are a few possibilities, but i don't know which (if any) are accurate. it could be that the tail could cause damage to satellites, or that it posed some danger to earth. all i was told for certain is that nasa is worried.

i recently emailed my contact through whom i learned the information for this thread, and they emailed me back, saying they had never heard of comet elenin, and included a link to a nasa page where it said the comet wasn't a threat.

i emailed one of their family members who also knew about the comet, and i got the same "i've never heard of comet elenin, but here's a nasa article about it" response.

pretty strange. if i get anything else, i'll post it.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by Bob Sholtz
 


What I'm getting loud and clear is that something very huge is being hidden from all of us. There is a truly unprecedented silence that tells me we are in some kind of imminent danger. There are some clues that have been dropped but beyond that, we are on our own. There is something completely wrong with how quiet the world is behaving in light of all the tragedies.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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there is a sun,with a jupiter sizes planet ,and notice in the outer dust ,which could be considered the kuiper belt,or the oort cloud ,,nemesis ,or the binary twin


this is what our solar system looks like from a distance

reply to post by iforget
 



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by excalibrate
 


I just found the new analysis interesting and somewhat applicable to this thread and am perfectly willing to agree to disagree about what our solar system may look like



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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Olympiad
Hi All

Has anyone heard of the OSIRIS-Rex program. The "official word" is that if it gets the go ahead it will launch in 2016, I know thats a liitle off the dates being mentioned on ATS for a meteor hit but how do we know it didn't launch already some time back to intercept Elenin?

National Geographic
news.nationalgeographic.com...

NASA
www.nasa.gov...

To quote "Orbiting 83 million and 126 million miles (133 million and 203 million kilometers) from the sun, RQ36 passes within about 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) of Earth's orbit. As a result, NASA has officially classified RQ36 as a "potentially hazardous asteroid."

I searched ATS for OSIRIS-Rex with no results so don't think this topic has been investigated before on ATS.

I'm only new here so go easy on me.





I just searched on OSIRIS-Rex myself... and all I came up with was your post, and my own here.
www.abovetopsecret.com...





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