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Arkansas: Weird Signal at AG.WLAR?

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posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


The Wakulla Volcano is within 20 miles of my house, and there is mostly just woods and swamps between me and it. There is also a very popular Sulfur Spring near the location that people reported seeing the smoke.

Many folks believe it was just smoldering Peat Moss in the swamp, but it abruptly stopped after some seismic activity, so I think it could have been a volcanic vent.

Anyway, thanks for including that link!




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Reminds me of that movie Dante's peak where the reports of small quakes and then sulfur springs start becoming burning hot right before the big eruption.

Been comp down since this thread was started did we ever find out what the big bleeps were?



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


If I'm not mistaken doesn't the Crater of Diamonds State Park at Murfreesboro sit on top of an old volcanic vent.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by derek_m24
 


Yes, a volcanic pipe. Hmmm let me see what I can find (there's lots of evidence of volcanoes, but nobody has actually said "this is an extinct volcano):
Murfreesboro
Hell's Half Acre - Hot Springs, AR



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by derek_m24
 


But the largest diamond found in the state came from Searcy and there is no diamond mine there or chutes that are known about. Arkansas has a volcanic past without a doubt the proof is everywhere. There are caves and crystal mines and lots of other minerals found here that easily prove the past. How long does it take to do the kind of studies to show what is moving under us. Don't we have sat's orbiting the planet that can measure the depths with infrared or whatever they use to see what is going on under the ground. I know there are other methods too, but how long does that take in reality? Then make this information available to the public.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


Pinnacle Mtn kinda looks like volcano...to me anyway.

I wouldn't think one would find a normal looking volcano north of the Arkansas River. The Ozark Mountains are actually a plateau with many caverns and underground streams.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by derek_m24
 


It definitely does. By the way aren't you the person that messaged me a while back about going up there to look? Did you ever?

And here is Pilot Knob, which if you have read the article about the possible volcanic eruption in AR, this is one of the mountains near that area, right near the Scott/Logan county line.

If I knew *exactly* where Colonel Logan lived at that time, I could figure out where the mountain was, because in the article he said he crossed a creek and that it was about 5 miles from his home.

Also, the article says "south-eastern Logan County". I'm trying to find out exactly where that would be, because they changed the Scott/Logan county lines a long time ago. I'll get back to everyone on that.
edit on 13-4-2011 by tmar11 because: (no reason given)


In south-eastern Logan County -
Mt. Nebo
Mount Magazine (which was always rumored to be a volcano, and of course it was said that it isn't. It doesn't really LOOK like one to me. Been here.)
Petit Jean (I've been here and it's quite a creepy area)

edit on 13-4-2011 by tmar11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


Yeah that was me...no luck.

From the coordinates given in the article the mountain is located south of Blue Mtn Lake and right on the edge of the Logan and Scott County line. Also Dry Creek is labeled as a stream on my map.

Looking at the topo Flood Mtn appears to have a chunk missing.

Coordinates N 35.03379 W 93.67570
edit on 13-4-2011 by derek_m24 because: to add coordinates



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


Also I use this to view topo maps

Topo Map



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by tmar11
 


Oh, forgot to mention that have an Arkansas Atlas that uses township and range coordinates and this is how I found the location for the supposed eruption



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 02:16 PM
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There is an add on for Google Earth that does thermal imaging. I added it to my Google Earth, don;t remember where I got it. Will look around and see if I can find it.

Would do a screen shot of my Google Earth, but for some reason the way I use to do screen shots, doesn't work anymore.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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This is my first post so first I'd like to say hello. Second, being that I live in AR this makes me more than a little nervous. As I'm sure you all know we've had some strange stuff going on here for a while now. All the quakes and the birds dying off. That was just very strange. All the birds that died off at the first of the year when they were originally blaming it on the weather, the storms had long since passed before that happened so I never bought that for a second.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Anmarie96
 



Saw thread that was quite interesting talking about giant whirlpools forming in the Atlantic Ocean:

AboveTopSecret


Now, could this water be "interacting" with magma/earth's core?!?

So my question is, what effect(s) can water vs. salt-water have on magma/lava??

If you throw a stone in a pond you get a ripple effect, but what happens when you throw a handful of rocks of all sizes at the same time?Almost similar to what we have now, sorta?



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by lordanimal
This is my first post so first I'd like to say hello. Second, being that I live in AR this makes me more than a little nervous. As I'm sure you all know we've had some strange stuff going on here for a while now. All the quakes and the birds dying off. That was just very strange. All the birds that died off at the first of the year when they were originally blaming it on the weather, the storms had long since passed before that happened so I never bought that for a second.


Well first: Welcome to ATS! Hope you enjoy your stay.

So are you feeling any kind of ground movement the way Susan has? These would be like slow swaying, not really quake like shaking, but slow movements. And what part of the state roughly are you in? I only ask so you may be of possible future help as we try to sort this all out.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:15 PM
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Ok so the opinion of one pro is that no other seismologists in the field feel that the problems are related to magma injection, as there would be other indicators. Right?

Then what's this?


Abstract

A portable digital network (the PANDA array) of 40 three-component stations with an aperture of about 35 km was deployed for 4 months in the Arkansas swarm area in 1987. Only 12 swarm events occurred during the deployment, in contrast to the intense seismic activity that characterized this region in 1982 to 1984. These events were relocated using a joint hypocentral determination technique (JHD). The JHD method used here allows for the simultaneous determination of P- and S-wave station corrections while providing information on the uniqueness of the solution based on the singular values of a matrix related to the station corrections.

P-wave station corrections, determined when all nonzero singular values were used in the computations (or with the two smallest nonzero singular values deleted), show a circular pattern of positive values surrounded by negative values. The epicentral area is localized slightly displaced from the center of the pattern. Since positive and negative corrections correspond to velocities that are lower and higher, respectively, than the average, our results indicate that the swarm area is characterized by seismic velocities lower than those of its surroundings. Independent information on this region is afforded by reflection seismic lines recorded in the swarm area and its vicinity, which show that the hypocenters are located in a region where strong reflectors completely lose their coherence, indicating that this volume is anomalous when compared to surrounding crust.

Additional support for a low-velocity zone comes from the results of a 3-D velocity inversion of the same PANDA data. A selected subset of data recorded digitally by the USGS in 1982 was also relocated. Comparison with the results from the PANDA data shows that the seismic activity did not migrate over a 5-yr period and that it is concentrated within a small volume between about 3 km and 6 km depth. While the results of this study do not determine the ultimate cause of the Arkansas swarm, the discovery of a pronounced localized low velocity zone is consistent with a previously proposed magmatic intrusion or a zone of highly fractured, fluid-filled crust.


bssa.geoscienceworld.org...

That's a scientific paper, for God's sakes. But ok, w/e.


And that's not at you Susan, I just get frustrated.

And btw, that signal on chart in the OP did indeed register on one of the TA stations. Oh, but I said that already.
edit on Wed Apr 13th 2011 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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I live in Bryant which is about 20 miles south of Little Rock. I haven't felt anything but last month we had a bigger tremor that was felt in a large part of the state and several people I work with told me they felt it. I guess I was too deep in sleep for it to have woke me up. It happened overnight. I have studied the New Madrid a lot lately considering all the crazy things that are going on all over and if we had another quake as big as the one back in the 1800s I'm quite sure it would cause a pretty large amount of damage even as far away as I am. I'm about 2 1/2 hours from Memphis. Of course I'd much rather have that happen than a volcano. lol. We do have that diamond mine here as mentioned earlier so I do agree it's a definite possibility.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Your not the only one that is frustrated. I feel the reply I got was another blanket type letter. We are suppose to get some heavy storms tonight, hoping it doesn't get real bad. Everyone stay safe, and we all have to keep digging at all the facts and everything going on here in Arkansas.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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I thought the storms weren't coming through until tomorrow night? There is a slight risk of severe but based on the last few storms that have came through in the late evening/overnight we probably don't have to worry about tornadoes. I am quite surprised that we haven't had that many this year.

Anyway not trying to get off subject. I think, at least I hope, more people are starting to take this seriously. I know my entire outlook has been changing lately as far as being prepared for the possibility of a major quake. It's one of those things that's not a matter of if, but when. Since the last Major event was in the 1800s I think enough time has gone by that people feel too safe.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by SusanFrey
 


Well just keep in mind that the AG network doesn't have another station close enough to WLAR for same-network corroboration of some seismic signals. And there you see the danger of government compartmentalizing. The right hand doesn't know that the left hand's about to erupt.




?



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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I think the most frightening thing is the maps you see from Cayce and others who have similar maps of what the US is supposed to look like in the future.



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