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The Yemen Massacre deeply overlooked

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posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 03:48 AM
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Yemenis have been murdered by their regime for weeks now and no real actions have been taken by the West unlike Libya where they quickly implemented a sanction, and quickly sponsored a no fly zone to attack Qaddafi from air and allow the supplies of arms to reach the Rebels.

Why is this massacre allowed but not the Libyan massacre, it is a question so many try to sidestep for special reason. What ever those reason maybe, it is shameful.



The scene was desperate and chaotic. It followed the worst day of violence in Yemen since protests against president Ali Abdullah Saleh began in earnest over a month ago. At least 45 people were killed and hundreds of others wounded as security forces and plainclothes government loyalists opened fire on protesters trying to march through the capital, Sana'a.

www.guardian.co.uk...

I will set the record here and allow those who are still trying to sidestep the question, to take a good look at what is happening.

Most Middle Eastern and N-African governments are backed by US, some say controlled by US through puppet regimes, unlike Libya, Lebanon and Syria. This should explain the swift action taken to sanction and attack the Libyan regime (which is anti-Imperialist), but are reluctant to take action in Yemen where protesters are murdered in daily basis throughout the country.



Such massacres are tolerated because the Yemeni regime cooperates with US and the West. Just today 2 AFP reported "At least two Yemeni protesters have been killed and several others wounded in the southern city of Aden after police opened fire on demonstrators"

The hypocrisy is that the US and West thinks it is "OK" to intervene in Libya for humanitarian reasons, but not in Yemen where protesters are murdered every day.

The answer to the question is that the West doesn't want the Yemeni regime to fall without a controlled transition, which would allow the West to control the outcome of the revolution, like in Egypt and Tunisia. That's why they are waiting for a division to occur, for current pro-US/Western forces to infiltrate the opposition and then you will see the regime collapse, and the infiltrators will get control of the transition.

That is exactly why Saleh said specifically that he will step down, but “I will transfer power to the people, who are the source and owner of power,
ibnlive.in.com...



While the murders continue, Saleh is looking for a US desired transition, but can't seem to find one. All Saleh finds is men like this, who are enraged, angry, ashamed that their own people would massacre them on behalf of external forces.



The West is using the same expire excuse of Al-Qaeda to justify the continuation of the massacre saying let's "save Yemen so that it does not become the next base for Al Qaeda".
articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com...


edit on 13-4-2011 by P3ACE0WAR because: typo




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 05:03 AM
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such awful stuff thank you for opening my eyes to this . more needs to be done you a right



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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I don't think u can blame the states for Yemen they've had troubles fro quite awhile. I believe there was a revolution there in the 90's. You've got southern cessationists, angry at having to send oil money north to saleh, the traditional al-houthi's, who are the prime target of AQAP(Saudia Arabian/North African Alquada "merger") recruitment probably, and then of course those loyal to Saleh.
WHile Saleh's loyalists make up what u might call a "majority government", the southerns and al houthis make up significant parts of the population.

Yemen angered by al-Shabab threat

Yemen has said it will not tolerate foreign fighters on its soil, following a pledge by Somalia's al-Shabab group that it would send fighters to help an al-Qaeda affiliate in the country.


It would have been wiser for those who promise to export terrorism to work towards stability in their own war-ridden state."



Yemen promises more operations against al Qaeda militants

Tribesmen from Mareb, east of Yemen, warned al-Qaeda operatives to immediately leave their province, otherwise they will be struck like their comrades in Arhab, Abyan and Shabwah.



Yemen against dark forces

The dark forces have joined with one aim: tearing up the unity of Yemen. Al-Qaeda and al-Houthi rebels have complimentary ideologies. Both of them intersect with the separatists in the south, enforcing the sectarian discourse, serving foreign agendas, and aim at destroying Yemen's stability and security


Notice these headlines are from Jan'10



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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i understand what your saying, but this type of brutality is happening all across that area of the world. the west would be in 5 to 8 countries now if we had to come and help these people from being slaughtered. america is barely holding on from financially going belly up, and europe is not doing so well either. other countries need to step up, and people need to quit bitching about why america doesn't do this or doesn't do that...force your own government to spend billions and send thousands of it's own troops to these areas if you are so angry with the response or non-response of america.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by jimmyx
 


The purpose of going into Libya was to seize control of the central bank and its oil.

I listened to an interview about Yemen last evening and I really feel awful for all the horror the population is enduring there. I wish them peace and tranquility soon.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by heyo
 


There's no such thing as Al-Qaeda, the small faction of Afghan Mujahideen under the command of Osama bin Laden was name Al-Qaeda by CIA and not by Osama bin Laden, or the extreme small followers of his.

Anyone who is fighting against the influence of US in the region is labeled Al-Qaeda, if you haven't noticed that yet then there is no point playing the "naming" game with you.

The majority of Yemen is not Saleh loyalists, that is an assumption you have made and you know it. The protests are happening all across the country, and people are killed in daily basis. Now the armed forces are divided between protesters and Saleh, soon Saleh will loose all his power, and all the armed forces will leave him, the only reason why he is up there to make sure the transition makes the West happy, and transition through an infiltrator.

The worst thing is that Yemenis are naturally armed (most have weapons at home), but they refused to take up arms and fight, unlike Libyans who are not naturally armed, but with the help of special ops and CIA, M16.. attacked the Army to get their weapons.


edit on 13-4-2011 by P3ACE0WAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 08:52 PM
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Its another said story mate.
But we cant just keep sending our soliders to fight and die for people thet either dont want change, or they wont fight for themselves.
People have to start fighting for themselves, yes, we could give them weapons to fight with. But our soliders have done enough dying on the soil of another country for another lost cause.
I know it sounds shallow, but so be it.
So We will go in and FIX things over there and then 10years later we will be back helping them to fix them up again after more civil UNREST. We will send in one puppet government only to over throw him in the next 10 years.
So all although i see your point and i agree that the situation over there is not good( Understatement)
But other than aid(weapons) i wouldnt be giving them any thing.
I would be getting them to clean up their own mess, this time.

Peace

Meathed

s&f
edit on 13-4-2011 by meathed because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by meathed
 


No please no, I wouldn't suggest the West to arm one side against another side. That is taking sides in a civil war, which is against International laws (who gives a damn), secondly it makes the situation worse.

I suggest the West to stop supporting people like Saleh, or like the Bahraini King. Why isn't there any sanctions? Why isn't there any ban in weapons sales, or freeze of assets or...

Violence won't solve the problem, Yemenis have weapons, they don't want to pick them up and kill their own brothers. You want them to fight and destroy their country like CIA trained Libyans?



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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Related to OP:

"Bahrainis mourn another victim of the Al Khalifa regime's brutal crackdown on the opposition, the fourth such fatality in less than two weeks."
www.presstv.ir...

This is the third or forth death under torture in Bahrain, against the protesters.

This is sick, US obviously will support this regime till the end for being a US puppet. There is absolutely no mention of these cases in Western media which is still staying silent.

While the West is calling the Libyan situation a massacre and the consecutive sanctions, asset freeze, no fly zone, and now the free flow of arms in to the hand of the Rebels, it refuses to do the same for Bahrainis or Yemenis.

Let the hypocrisy continue.



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by P3ACE0WAR
 



I agree that there should be sanctions. But signing bits of paper gets us nowhere. With sanctions the already oppressed people suffer more and more..
And No i dont want them to destroy themselves.
But people cant keep looking to the parents of the west to keep sending their children to die for their cause.
Its another no win situation. Humanity loses yet again.



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:51 AM
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Originally posted by P3ACE0WAR
reply to post by heyo
 


There's no such thing as Al-Qaeda, the small faction of Afghan Mujahideen under the command of Osama bin Laden was name Al-Qaeda by CIA and not by Osama bin Laden, or the extreme small followers of his.

Anyone who is fighting against the influence of US in the region is labeled Al-Qaeda, if you haven't noticed that yet then there is no point playing the "naming" game with you.


Yeah well that's why I called them Alqaida cause that's what they're labelled as lol.


The majority of Yemen is not Saleh loyalists, that is an assumption you have made and you know it. The protests are happening all across the country, and people are killed in daily basis. Now the armed forces are divided between protesters and Saleh, soon Saleh will loose all his power, and all the armed forces will leave him, the only reason why he is up there to make sure the transition makes the West happy, and transition through an infiltrator.

In the 2006 election he recieved 77.17% of the popular vote. Same as the election 2003, which caused the Yemeni civil war of which Saleh came out on top. SOURCE
I think you'r right though, he will lose power, even though he was democratically elected. TBH, from what i remember reading Saleh was just never really liked by US counterparts. I betchyoo there's a wikileaks memo making fun of him.


The worst thing is that Yemenis are naturally armed (most have weapons at home), but they refused to take up arms and fight, unlike Libyans who are not naturally armed, but with the help of special ops and CIA, M16.. attacked the Army to get their weapons.


Not sure what you're saying here. Obviously Yemeni's will fight, they JUST had a civil war.????



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by heyo
 


I don't dispute the election, although just because the West says the elections were handy dandy doesn't make it so.

I'm talking about now, the millions who are protesting shows the strength of anti-Yemeni regime protests.

Regarding the civil war, that was in late 1990, I'm talking about now, Yemenis are armed right now, but they refuse to use them. Libyans are not armed, rather attacked the Army with the help of CIA and Spec Ops to get their weapons.

Although I don't disagree as more and more armed forces like Police and Army officers defect to the protesters side, you can expect a civil war to start, because there will be a lot of regime infiltrators amongst the defects. Yemenis themselves have weapons at home, I'm talking about the protesters, but they don't use it.



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 01:29 AM
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reply to post by meathed
 


I agree, but I'm not talking about those stupid sanctions which US sponsored against Iraq, which led to deaths of over a million babies.

Not those type of sanctions, sanctions against the government, although I'm starting to have a change of heart and see Saleh's legitimacy to rule.

Non-the less I'm talking about weapons sanctions etc/



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by P3ACE0WAR
reply to post by meathed
 


I agree, but I'm not talking about those stupid sanctions which US sponsored against Iraq, which led to deaths of over a million babies.

Not those type of sanctions, sanctions against the government, although I'm starting to have a change of heart and see Saleh's legitimacy to rule.

Non-the less I'm talking about weapons sanctions etc/


Your point is Understood about sanctions, but anyone can kill anyone without a weapon.
And even if we place sanctions what will happen?
I dont see the Yemenites benefiting from any action.

And about Saleh's rule. Well what do we class as legitement??



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