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Amazing video of iPhone reaching 100,000 ft altitude.

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posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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I just thought I'd share this video I came across on youtube. Apparently a family decided to attach an iPhone and HD camera to a large balloon in an attempt to send it into near-orbit of the Earth. It's amazing some of the things people come up with.


I'll paste the info on the video below.

PREPARATION - The mission took place last August, but to get to the fateful date of launch, it took months of study of materials and equipment to be prepared so that the camera could record the flight and the ball could reach as high as possible. Mission accomplished: the balloon inflated with helium - similar in all respects to the balloons that are launched with meteorological instruments inside - came in just over an hour up to 100 000 feet (more than 30 000 m height) before you break out and quickly return to Earth, just 30 miles from where he left (about 50 km). EQUIPMENT - A iPhone to track through the GPS coordinates of the ball, once brought back to earth, a high definition camera enclosed in a small box covered with insulating material (for shock and vibration data on the speed and the wind, but also for the temperature reaches 60 degrees below zero), and of course to allow the balloon to go as high as possible. To help his father (Luke is a cinematographer and director) came to the rescue also Max's uncle, a professional body. Ready equipment, the dream of Midsummer begins in an August afternoon, a large open space in a park in upstate New York village of Newburgh. LANDING - Broke the ball and reached the highest point above the heavens, the fall was very rapid. On the descent, the contents into the GPS started to trace the coordinates of what remained of the balloon with helium and tin containing phone and camera. Fortunately, the remains of the expedition landed not far from where they started: about 30 miles to the north wing of the launch base of Newburgh. Like any skydiver on his first launch, the iPhone has also faced an emergency landing and was entangled in the branches of a tree, but thanks to LEDs that Luke and Max had placed on the box, with the darkness the shipment was recovered, and material technology has come home safe and sound.] PREPARATION - The mission took place last August, but to get to the fateful date of launch, it took months of study of materials and equipment to prepare to ensure that the camera could record the flight and the ball could reach as high as possible. Mission accomplished: the balloon inflated with helium - similar in all respects to the balloons that are launched with meteorological instruments inside - came in just over an hour up to 100 000 feet (more than 30 000 m height) before you break out and quickly return to Earth, just 30 miles from where he left (about 50 km).


EQUIPMENT - A iPhone to track through the GPS coordinates of the ball, once brought back to earth, a high definition camera enclosed in a small box covered with insulating material (for shock and vibration data on the speed and the wind, but also for the temperature reaches 60 degrees below zero), and of course to allow the balloon to go as high as possible. To help his father (Luke is a cinematographer and director) came to the rescue also Max's uncle, a professional body. Ready equipment, the dream of Midsummer begins in an August afternoon, a large open space in a park in upstate New York village of Newburgh.


LANDING - Broke the ball and reached the highest point above the heavens, the fall was very rapid. On the descent, the contents into the GPS started to trace the coordinates of what remained of the balloon with helium and tin containing phone and camera. Fortunately, the remains of the expedition landed not far from where they started: about 30 miles to the north wing of the launch base of Newburgh. Like any skydiver on his first launch, the iPhone has also faced an emergency landing and was entangled in the branches of a tree, but thanks to LEDs that Luke and Max had placed on the box, with the darkness the shipment was recovered, and material technology has come home safe and sound.


This is not my personal video or anything. Just wanted to see if it interested anyone as much as it did for me.




posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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Good find and great job to the 2010 Brooklyn Space Team



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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what a lucky kid!!!
hes got a cool dad

lucky kids : edit

and I think they tried to call it at 3:46

edit on 12-4-2011 by el1jah because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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The kids are very lucky to participate in something like this. Great little experiment and pretty amazing what a phone and some balloons can do.




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 03:14 AM
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Was it not high enough to burn up on re-entry?

Very cool though



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 03:31 AM
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Originally posted by scottlpool2003
Was it not high enough to burn up on re-entry?


Well,
it wasn't entering the atmosphere at 5,000 kilometers a second
like most orbital craft or meteors do.


David Grouchy



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 06:43 AM
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when nasa does this it probably cost $100 million.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by wingsfan
 


I was thinking the same thing. Nasa spends millions to send a low-res camera to space, and these guys do the same thing with a balloon, iPhone, and an HD cam.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by Ihsahn
reply to post by wingsfan
 


I was thinking the same thing. Nasa spends millions to send a low-res camera to space, and these guys do the same thing with a balloon, iPhone, and an HD cam.


nasa probably spends a few hundred on equipment then the rest on a crack team of airbrushers and photo-shop masters!



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by wingsfan
 


hahahaha. That made me crack up!

Back on-topic, I'm surprised that the iPhone and camera survived the fall from that height. I suppose landing in a tree 50 feet from the ground is better than slamming straight into it.



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