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CFTC and SEC Staffs to Host Public Roundtable Discussion on Dodd-Frank Implementation

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posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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CFTC and SEC Staffs to Host Public Roundtable Discussion on Dodd-Frank Implementation


www.cftc.gov

Washington, DC – The staffs of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) today announced that they intend to hold a two-day joint public roundtable on May 2-3, 2011, to discuss the schedule for implementing final rules for swaps and security-based swaps under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

The Dodd-Frank Act gives the CFTC and SEC certain flexibility...
(visit the link for the full news article)



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posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Flexibility?

The Dodd-Frank Act.

Interesting.


Quote from : Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

The Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Pub.L. 111-203, H.R. 4173) is a federal statute in the United States that was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010.

The Act is a product of the financial regulatory reform agenda of the Democratically-controlled 111th United States Congress and the Obama administration.

The law was initially proposed on December 2, 2009, in the House by Barney Frank, and in the Senate Banking Committee by Chairman Chris Dodd.

Due to their involvement with the bill, the conference committee that reported on June 29, 2010, voted to name the bill after the two members of Congress.

The Act, which was passed as a response to the late-2000s recession, is the most sweeping change to financial regulation in the United States since the Great Depression,and represents a significant change in the American financial regulatory environment affecting all Federal financial regulatory agencies and affecting almost every aspect of the nation's financial services industry.


Doesn't China own most of our debt now?

Roundtable Discussion on Dodd-Frank Implementation

I'm sure going to pay attention to this discussion.

www.cftc.gov
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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Anyone else paying close attention to this information?

Making it easier to bypass Government restriction more than likely.

Not that they ever worried about that to begin with.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Dodd/Frank is anything but reform.

The fact that the two key players in helping create the financial crisis wrote this bill should say everything you need to know.

They help create the mess and then make a law to "clean it up".



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
Dodd/Frank is anything but reform.

The fact that the two key players in helping create the financial crisis wrote this bill should say everything you need to know.

They help create the mess and then make a law to "clean it up".


Of course.

The Hegelian Dialectic in action.

Make the mess and get paid to fix it.

Sounds like BP Plc and a few other scams on our taxes like 9/11.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


My problem with Wall St. reform is that it is hardly ever reform and more about Wall St. lawlessness. I'm always of the mind that you don't need a million pages of legislation to fix a problem or end abuse. You need a million pages to paper over a problem and hide abuse.

16 pages protected the banking system for 70 years until Clinton had the Glass-Steagall act repealed.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


My problem with Wall St. reform is that it is hardly ever reform and more about Wall St. lawlessness. I'm always of the mind that you don't need a million pages of legislation to fix a problem or end abuse. You need a million pages to paper over a problem and hide abuse.

16 pages protected the banking system for 70 years until Clinton had the Glass-Steagall act repealed.


Of course.

It is all about the money and nothing more.

Which is what Washington D.C. is about as well as Wall Street.

For the love of money-O' jays Full Version


To Wall Street and Washington D.C. nothing is more important.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


like their control over fanny and freddy worked out so well for us americans.

now this?

why is america so freaking stupid to keep those people where they do the most damage.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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This is from David "Axis-of-evil" Frum, no left leaning pundit:


The new Republican House majority appropriately mistrusts government regulation. But if the financial crisis taught us anything, it should have taught that financial regulation is different from other forms of regulation. Invisible charges imposed by a financial cartel is not my idea of a free market. The swipe charge rule in Dodd-Frank should stay.

Big Banks Want a Favor--At Your Expense

an interesting read, Frum mad-as-hell about the power hold of the banks in Washington, who will get to the staff before the roundtable to influence proposed regs?



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


like their control over fanny and freddy worked out so well for us americans.

now this?

why is america so freaking stupid to keep those people where they do the most damage.


Because the average citizen knows absolutely nothing about spotting the corruption.

On top of this they do not know how to stop it even if they do spot it.

Then let us not forget that a majority is busy watching American Idol and Survivor.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


glad i am not average

glad i hate reality tv



for the thread



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by SpartanKingLeonidas

Because the average citizen knows absolutely nothing about spotting the corruption.

On top of this they do not know how to stop it even if they do spot it.

Then let us not forget that a majority is busy watching American Idol and Survivor.




For years, because the average American wasn't bribed at the local jail, they thought the nation was not corrupt; they thought voting in Christian candidates would keep the nation corruption free; they were intentionally made to feel powerless and let their elected leader take care of everything.

So we got to this point....


I reminded him of the subject matter of my site, and how his statement confirms the concerns of conspiracy theorists everywhere. He said, "It used to be a conspiracy, now it's just the way things are."


From the ATS thread, "Damn The Country, Obama Must Fail"



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:35 PM
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Originally posted by desert
This is from David "Axis-of-evil" Frum, no left leaning pundit:


The new Republican House majority appropriately mistrusts government regulation. But if the financial crisis taught us anything, it should have taught that financial regulation is different from other forms of regulation. Invisible charges imposed by a financial cartel is not my idea of a free market. The swipe charge rule in Dodd-Frank should stay.

Big Banks Want a Favor--At Your Expense

an interesting read, Frum mad-as-hell about the power hold of the banks in Washington, who will get to the staff before the roundtable to influence proposed regs?


Why not get involved ourselves as a community?

We're concerned citizens are we not?

I keep saying I believe ATS needs to form a policy think-tank.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


glad i am not average

glad i hate reality tv



for the thread


I've never been average.

"Reality TV" is anything but reality.

The reality of it is that it is a complete waste of time.

And completely staged just like Washington D.C.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by desert
 


But how are we actually changing it?

We are not.

Nothing done within the confines of ATS changes a single thing about it.

Unless we become a positive, legal, and non-violent part of the change.

Through getting personally involved by a much more hands-on approach.



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


Exactly. Well, I can see the value of getting information out there. And discussion. Like what can be done on ATS. But, yes, change takes more. Change takes action.

Yes, personal involvement. #1 vote. #2 join others in a "pressure group" to put pressure on those for whom you vote.

For ex, the NRA sure is one helluva pressure group. And at the same time our soldiers were coming home from Iraq with missing limbs, a pressure group sent in petitions to FCC when Janet Jackson exposed a nipple, prompting action on the part of govt. (Note, though, the JJ pressure group already had friends in high places, making success a tad easier.)

Re topic of thread, this pressure group could help, for ex. Public Citizen here and petition here.

ANY pressure group is "collective action". Some may label certain "c a" groups as Communist, Marxist, etc., but, truly, even the Tea Party is a "collective action". Now, truly grassroots groups, IMO, are better than astroturf groups. I have certainly written to corporations to commend them for their actions I agree with, but I might not necessarily belong to a group that industry sponsored.

A truly grassroots group is a group to be feared by govt, for it means citizens are showing their power. When citizens join industry front groups, while the groups seem to effect change, that change is going to be what the industry wants, which might be at total odds of what is good for the citizen.

As in any group (family, church, social, etc) people will argue and disagree and have differing viewpoints, and grassroots groups are no different. That is not a bad thing, that is democracy, but the group must not lose its focus. Another group I support for its focus changed hands after an election; the new board had to tone down its personal rhetoric, though, as it put off members. The group refocused and kept members who would have left.

So, yes, info is good, but info without action will only lead to no change or drag out change. Even with action, however, change may take longer than one expects. The key is to keep the pressure on.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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Forex is sending letters to the buyers that say that it will be illegal to sell to them by July 14th 2011, any person that is not a qualified buyer seller will not be able to trade commodities and you have to have over one million dollars in order to qualify. Please make a new thread about this, I am not that good at it and this is very important, here is the link to one of the letters.

Link


There are many other examples of the letter if you google Forex July 14 illegal.
edit on 18-6-2011 by Elieser because: link corrected

edit on 18-6-2011 by Elieser because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
Dodd/Frank is anything but reform.

The fact that the two key players in helping create the financial crisis wrote this bill should say everything you need to know.

They help create the mess and then make a law to "clean it up".


yep and the clean up leaves you more broken then the crisis

still having a hard time believing they are going to take away your right to buy sell metal over the table Ill tell you now full out martial law wont be far behind a law like that.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by UcDat
 


I believe the provision in that bill is being misinterpreted.

I believe it is for levered investment vehicles tied to finite assets.

When you have 200 ETFs per every troy ounce of gold or silver you have some massive leverage there and no way to actually make delivery should the requests come in in the form of a run. Which is actually a good thing in my opinion..But I still don't think we need 6 million pages of legislation to control excessively levered investment vehicles.
edit on 19-6-2011 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by desert
reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


Exactly. Well, I can see the value of getting information out there. And discussion. Like what can be done on ATS. But, yes, change takes more. Change takes action.


Of course.

Change has to embody more than talking.

Otherwise it is nothing more then empty rhetoric.

Words are nothing but a hollow gesture without action backing them.

The right words and the right actions as well nothing stupid and nothing illegal.

Whether we agree on laws in place or not the Government has laws to back them up.

Through societal agreement by no one acting against changing those laws.


Originally posted by desert
Yes, personal involvement. #1 vote. #2 join others in a "pressure group" to put pressure on those for whom you vote.


Yes and too few people in the nation let alone ATS vote.

They falsely concur that voting does nothing.

And then they decry certain elements, like a pressure group, is wrong.

Of course they would not refer to it as a pressure group.

But they would deny creating a non-profit group with a think-tank.


Originally posted by desert
For ex, the NRA sure is one helluva pressure group. And at the same time our soldiers were coming home from Iraq with missing limbs, a pressure group sent in petitions to FCC when Janet Jackson exposed a nipple, prompting action on the part of govt. (Note, though, the JJ pressure group already had friends in high places, making success a tad easier.)


Yes it sure is an excellent example.

These groups start with without friends in high places sometimes.

And even if they do not they can be found to have like minded ideals.


Originally posted by desert
Re topic of thread, this pressure group could help, for ex. Public Citizen here and petition here.


Another excellent example.


Originally posted by desert
ANY pressure group is "collective action". Some may label certain "c a" groups as Communist, Marxist, etc., but, truly, even the Tea Party is a "collective action". Now, truly grassroots groups, IMO, are better than astroturf groups. I have certainly written to corporations to commend them for their actions I agree with, but I might not necessarily belong to a group that industry sponsored.


Personally, I can see how ATS might be a stronger force, for the "good of the collective".

A lot of things would have to change though.

And too many people would not get involved.

The Tea Party was doomed from the outset due to their not watching for the snakes in the grass.

Inside of the first five minutes of hearing about the forming of it I knew it was doomed.

These grassroots movements never watch for Agent Provocateurs.

And then they ignorantly seek out someone like Palin to run it for them.

What they should have done was stick to their roots and seek from within.


Originally posted by desert
A truly grassroots group is a group to be feared by govt, for it means citizens are showing their power. When citizens join industry front groups, while the groups seem to effect change, that change is going to be what the industry wants, which might be at total odds of what is good for the citizen.


I agree with you here wholeheartedly.

A civil group with non-violent tendencies can create a massive impact.

Many organizations like this already exist.


Originally posted by desert
As in any group (family, church, social, etc) people will argue and disagree and have differing viewpoints, and grassroots groups are no different. That is not a bad thing, that is democracy, but the group must not lose its focus. Another group I support for its focus changed hands after an election; the new board had to tone down its personal rhetoric, though, as it put off members. The group refocused and kept members who would have left.


This is always the case.

I've been speaking to people locally.

One of my first suggestions was exactly what you pointed out.

Plus having a few lawyers within the group so as to keep things completely legal.

And anyone suggesting violent action, negative actions, or revolution is kicked out immediately.

For a few reasons.

1) Potentially bringing Government intervention.

a) Through attention of those people being violent offenders and or Agent Provocateurs.

b) Through those people recruiting the wrong people and staging a coup.

c) Through it becoming a "right-wing versus left-wing" idiot group after an influx of recruits.

2) Everything within the group is legally done and with thought out ramifications.

a) This way no one is stopped, harassed, and or wiretapped illegally or legally.

b) No one can ever say they were not aware of what was going on.

c) Everyone has a voice.

3) The group never becomes synonymous with Waco, Timothy McVeigh, or 9/11.

a) Groups are always infiltrated.

b) A few wrong thinking individuals can take a good cause down.

c) Even if they think they're right they're probably wrong.


Originally posted by desert
So, yes, info is good, but info without action will only lead to no change or drag out change. Even with action, however, change may take longer than one expects. The key is to keep the pressure on.


Of course.

But how do we get people who are non-involved into getting involved?

And of course keep it simple.




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