Interesting comparison on the dispossessed in Japan

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posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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Not sure if this is the right forum - Mods please feel free to move it....

Japan gets hit by its biggest ever earthquake, then a Tsunami and of course nuclear fallout from Fukushima. The world goes into emotional meltdown as 160,000 people are left homeless...

But hang on...160,000 homeless? It is of course a dreadful figure and an enormous humanitarian disaster - but in New York City in 2010 113,000 needed the use of a homeless shelter and on some individual nights recently 40,000 made use of homeless shelters. Where's the urgency to deal with that problem? Where is the despair at the plight of the dispossessed in New York City?

It almost goes without saying but right now across the USA there are a projected ONE MILLION people who are homeless - the figures from Japan almost pale into insignificance when the comparison is made. Why is there not the same sense of urgency politically in the USA to resolve this issue?

Oz
edit on 11-4-2011 by Ozscot because: typo




posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Ozscot
 


I believe it has to do with the fact that 160,000 being rendered homeless in a few minutes is more drastic than a slow move towards the streets by low numbers over a longer period of time.

I do however, agree that the numbers seem low in comparison but remember what happened in Katrina. It was also devastating to have 1000's of people homeless within hours.

100 or 1,000 ... still heartbreaking tho.

edit on 11-4-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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I can see what you mean Jude and essentially you are correct. It just strikes me as odd that becoming dispossessed as a consequence of a natural disaster (over which no one has control) - leads to all sorts of action and intervention whereas if you become dispossessed as a consequence of social, political or economic disaster then you're very much left to 'get on with it'. No one really seems interested in whether you had any control over those social, political or economic events at all. It's just 'tough'. The default position appears to be that 'It's your own fault' and not a seismic one.

Oz



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by Ozscot
 


Well if it continue on going on like that with alert 7 emergency in Japan all those homeless may not be doing it in the long term. I send them positives waves.


Thruthseek3r



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by Ozscot
I can see what you mean Jude and essentially you are correct. It just strikes me as odd that becoming dispossessed as a consequence of a natural disaster (over which no one has control) - leads to all sorts of action and intervention whereas if you become dispossessed as a consequence of social, political or economic disaster then you're very much left to 'get on with it'. No one really seems interested in whether you had any control over those social, political or economic events at all. It's just 'tough'. The default position appears to be that 'It's your own fault' and not a seismic one.

Oz


I see your point.

The other issue is that the homeless in our own Countries are invisible to us and the Govt. as well. We don't see them because we choose not to. It's horrifying to look our possible future in the eye, realize that many of us are but a weekly paycheck from the same fate and confront it.

When it happens because of a disaster, it's newsworthy and water cooler fodder. We are hit full force with an impact factor that is the stuff of nightmares.

Therein lies the difference.



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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I'd rather my tax money go to the Japanese. At least we know they'll do something with it unlike the typical American welfare recipient.



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by Fitch303
 


Probably the most ill-informed opinion I have ever read here. Go to Ca and check out some of the car parks at night where you will find people sleeping in their cars. They are not 'welfare recipients' they are school teachers, librarians etc. Your reply highlighted one of the major problems in the USA - ignorance of the facts and a shallow understanding of the issues.

Oz



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by Ozscot
reply to post by Fitch303
 


Probably the most ill-informed opinion I have ever read here. Go to Ca and check out some of the car parks at night where you will find people sleeping in their cars. They are not 'welfare recipients' they are school teachers, librarians etc. Your reply highlighted one of the major problems in the USA - ignorance of the facts and a shallow understanding of the issues.

Oz



Yep! Living that American dream up until the last dollar is spent before it is officially earned will put teachers, liberains, etc., plus doctors and lawyers in the parks at night. Blame two big factors, "buy now/pay later" facts of recent American culture and those that don't simply don't want to work.

I would wager that most of the Japanese suffering from homeless right now, had homes and jobs and did not the shiftless, users of the system. This thread is comparing apples to oranges. --And we have lots of bad apples.



posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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Again, someone who has no idea of the complexities or the facts surrounding homelessness and who'd rather deal with it by appealing to useless generalisations. Is it any wonder the USA is in a mess? No they didn't get in over their heads or run up debt - they woke one morning to find their salaries had been legally slashed by 25% and ordered onto furloughs in a bid to rein in State Spending. And what part of the 'Japanese' having jobs doesn't equate with Americans who have jobs? The people I'm referring to above are as I described - Teachers and Librarians to name but two and no they are not unemployed - they are in employment. But cosy yourself with your preconceived notions if it helps.

Oz





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