Drug-resistant 'superbug' NDM 1 ! !!!!!!

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posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Matthew Dark
 


SIlver nitrate was used routinely as an eye drop for newborns even pretty recently.. still used in places. It was excellent, but burned the new born eyes, so now they usually use chloramphenicol or Neomycin ( yet more antibiotics). IMO they should have stuck with the Silver Nitrate. Its used as a prophylaxis for neonatal conjunctivitis and was state law in many states.

Silver in many forms has been used in main stream medicine since there was main stream medicine, and used as an antibiotic throughout history... its not like its anything new or only the comain of the new agers and fringers.

Here are some of the routine uses for this oh so scary toxic substance:


Water disinfection in hotels and hospitals
Postharvest cleaning of oysters and crabs
Inhibition of bacterial growth on chicken farms
Water recycling aboard space shuttles
Home purification of water in Europe and North America
Point of use disinfectant for water and vegetables in Mexico
Alternative to antibiotics (not recommended by the FDA)
Alternative to laundry detergent[dubious – discuss]
Application to eyes of newborn babies to prevent infection
Coating on catheters to prevent infection[7]

I hate wiki, but it had it all crammed together.
en.wikipedia.org...




posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


It's also made into an airborne spray to clean out the ventalation shafts in buildings.
I've heard of it being used in nebulizers as well.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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Well it's in the US now. Enjoy.

Superbug Pneumonia: 37 States, 50% Mortality Rate

This is possibly our biggest infection control dilemma yet.

Although cases of this particular pneumonia infection have been on the rise worldwide for the past 10 years, there is an alarming spread recently across the US.

What makes this opportunistic “superbug” such a nightmare is that it is Carbapenem-Resistant, meaning “last resort antibiotic” resistant. It’s a Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP); Klebsiella pneumoniae is a strain of Klebsiella which is related to E. Coli and Salmonella from the family Enterobacteriaceae.

Thirty-seven states plus Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico have reported the outbreak, up from thirty-five states last year. The CDC believes it is also spreading in 14 other US territories but is going unreported.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by TETRA.X
 


where do you get the kind that you take? what is a safe regular dose, that wouldn't turn you.. you know blue.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by TETRA.X
 


Also.. in the case of that mother you are talking about, how do you know she wasn't being treated for it by doctors and etc.





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