New Car Engine Sends Shock Waves Through Auto Industry

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posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by yizzel

Originally posted by Teabags
Why do we have to ween ourselves off of oil???? It comes from the Earth. It is natural. what the heck is wrong with oil?


Not many people know this but the oil is there to lubricate the iron core of the planet. Without it, the core would seize up like on Mars and the planet will not be able to generate a magnetic field which we all know is necessary to protect us from dangerous cosmic rays.

We are already feeling the effects, all those earthquakes are down to low oil pressure. Just like in a car, when the engine runs out of oil it will violently come to a screeching halt.



Where did you learn this? I am curious now........




posted on Apr, 11 2011 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by TheEndIsNear421

Originally posted by yizzel

Originally posted by Teabags
Why do we have to ween ourselves off of oil???? It comes from the Earth. It is natural. what the heck is wrong with oil?


Not many people know this but the oil is there to lubricate the iron core of the planet. Without it, the core would seize up like on Mars and the planet will not be able to generate a magnetic field which we all know is necessary to protect us from dangerous cosmic rays.

We are already feeling the effects, all those earthquakes are down to low oil pressure. Just like in a car, when the engine runs out of oil it will violently come to a screeching halt.



Where did you learn this? I am curious now........



Yea, just do a basic search. References, links are there. It goes with Abiotic Oil theory.

They found long dry wells filling up, and went back into production in many places. We have a "shallow" understanding of plate Tectonics at best, and can only guess at the makeup of the core. But if it is creating a field, it is a dynamic structure and needs a medium to suspend the moving material, be it iron or some exotic metal plasma.

ZG



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 12:23 AM
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The industry and infrastructure of the machine we call civilization was built from the ground up for oil. So much we take for granted is part of that industry. Thousands of chemical derivatives for plastics, cosmetics,and other industries plus fuels and lubrication oils are dependent and would literally kill to avoid death.

People in panic pull their savior under water to keep from drowning. How much more would these industries, by themselves or as a cooperative, could not control even our governments to keep oil from becoming less profitable?

Car manufacturers are just the top of the pyramid of profit. The industry is supported by thousands of parts makers, suppliers of materials, services and stores for employees and their families to spend their pay. Slight changes in that industry effects millions of people, and billions in profits. It is all built on oil.

We likely have hundreds of perfect ideas for new engines, but who wants to turn over the industry at their own expense, and a contract killing from their own industry.

Flashy stuff like the Tesla is tolerated because it is a diversion for public need of movement in that direction and well out of range of viability for any but the rich. But maybe the corporate social system will break down for lack of any markets now.

Permanent Press clothing was outlawed because the Clothing Cleaners industry lobbied that so many would loose market and thousands would go out of business. We have "No Iron" and some other things, but it took time, lawyers and crafty inventors to get around.

This design might cause a rukus for a while, but I fear it will be starved out by reluctant markets, and all the associated industries being less than friendly to them.

ZG



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 01:31 AM
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That's interesting, but even if every car manufacturer decided to build these engines and convert, it would be several years before the bugs could be worked out.

A few weeks ago, I saw something similar that was being built, and unlike a new engine, this would enable manufacturers and owners of cars back to the fifties to retro-fit their existing engines.

This design was ingenious and consisted of an intake manifold and (can't really call it a carburator) fuel atomizer unit.

It atomizes the raw gasoline and since it's atomized, you will be getting over 90% fuel burn, zero emissions, and in fact, you won't need a radiator or water jackets as the engine will be so efficient at burning the fuel, it won't get that hot.

The first being built goes on a 1967 Ford Mustang 289, and will be getting somewhere between 60-80 mpg while retaining all its original performance.

This guy has already built a couple experimental units and he is beyond brilliant - he's a very talented engineer.

Imagine. An after-market kit for some $500 and you'd get roughly four times your current fuel mileage, but you'll have magnificent horsepower and torque without the heat and emissions.

Fuel injection is so very wasteful by comparison.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 



I'm an old school muscle car guy...but this still is an incredible idea.

Just one question...does it sound awesome.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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It's a shame vehicle technology is so bound to money and corporations... this is why everything takes decades to become mainstream. As great as this technology sounds, if they don't see profit, it will never see the light of day



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by Nyteskye
 


Perhaps you should try the 180 degree reciprocal, and instead say "it will happen".
Remember positive thought creates
Negative thought destroys



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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Well, hopefully this is not bought up by the big oil companies and shoved away somewhere.


I for one am not worried about big oil shoving it away somewhere.

I am worried about the state of Calif banning them because they don't meet some outrageous smog rules that the state will dream up.

edit on 12-4-2011 by ANNED because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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The gas crisis of the 1979-1980 essentially killed the muscle car.

Higher gas prices made them obsolete.

What will happen, whether we accept new technology such as this engine or not is that the market will demand more fuel efficient engines and vehicles as gas prices continue to rise as they will.

There is only so much that can be done with a 4 stroke internal combustion engine and efficiency.
Computers, electronic ignition, fuel injection and cylinder deactivation have pretty much extracted as much efficiency as one will affordably attain in a mass produced engine.

So it is only a matter of time as fuel prices continue to rise that people will naturally migrate towards more fuel efficient technology as is used in this engine used in conjunction with hybrid technology..

There is a guy who drag races a little Nissan with two electric motors that can out accelerate C6 (the latest) Corvettes in the quarter mile. He is running 12 second quarter miles which is really fast....in case you didn't know.

So imagine having an electlric car charged by this little efficient engine....this is what the future holds ....better technology and still fun to drive !


www.youtube.com...





posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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I spent 6 years working on Fords ne direct injection engine and we were getting 40mpg no problem. I'm thinking of buying one I still have the software and such to run it stand alone. I think I could get 50 or 60 maybe more now using it to power a generator instead of a transmission. I wonder if they are willing to buy my hand built prototypes from the mid 90's



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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It will never get put into production. It will cut into profits.



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


This has already been buried. Too bad, I think it had a lot of potential....



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 03:39 AM
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reply to post by HispanicPanic
 


Unreliable rotary engine.

True, if you bought one in 1972.......

A few years ago, I bought a car with a turbo rotary producing a modest 400bhp on pump fuel from a guy who who used it for street/strip racing. He sold it because he could only manage low 11's. Silly boy jammed the engine into an unmodified 1977 ute chassis. It was never going to perform. I never raced it but owned the car for 4 years and took it out most weekends just to clear the cobwebs (burn the tyres).

The acceleration of this car was unbelievable and the engine never skipped a beat but I had to sell it due to moving from a house to a unit.

I recently heard from the guy who bought it off me and he was fitting a $3000 race auto trans since he broke 2 gearboxes racing but never touched the engine.

Unreliable rotary engine? Yeah right! An equivalent V8 would have spat a conrod through the block long ago. We have made leaps and bounds in metallurgy and materials technology. This engine might actually be feasible. The key factor is thermal efficiency.



posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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Rotary engines....

My parents upon my recommendation bought a new 1974 Mazda RX4 with a 4 speed transmission.
What a fun and FAST car it was....not a bit of vibration all the way up to redline.
It revved so smooth sounding like a turbine engine and....
It could bark the tires in 3 gears.


Under the hood it had a really Tiny little 13B rotary engine but under the air cleaner was a fairly large 4 Barrel carburetor. It would eat gas when you opened the secondaries but it could actually outrun 305 CI V8 Camaros.

Due to the size of the engine it had great weight distribution front to rear so the handling was very good as well.

These early Mazda rotaries were prone to apex seal failures but we kept up with the oil changes at 3K intervals and never experienced a problem with ours. Fortunately.

My parents eventually got rid of it some 7 years later due to the all too common Japanese reclaimed metal combined with Midwest Salt induced body rot.

But not a single problem with the Rotary engine it still worked fine. Even after all of the stoplight races !!

It was a really good car. And a lot of fun to drive.

To MAZDA for their innovation and making such a fun and affordable car !!





posted on Apr, 20 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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That's awesome !

The best part is that it's not some obscure inventor that makes wild claims and seems never able to produce anything.

This is a professor at a major institution. I'm excited.



posted on Feb, 11 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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As much as I'd like to get exited for this I'm sure big oil won't let it happen. It all about the bottom line.



posted on Feb, 11 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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See how simple that little engine is that he is holding?

Something like that could be easily printed out using a cnc mill or a 3d printer with milling capability. Instead of a huge complicated engine, you use a large electric motor powered by simple efficient generators. Start-up car company's would be a new market as this simplifies the auto making process in huge way, just as Ford's original assembly line. Electric motors will also last longer as it has fewer parts.

My only fear is that the new wave generator won't be able to power an electric motor directly, and still force the use of giant battery cells. That is still pretty damaging if we end up filling the landfills up with spent battery packs out of our cars.





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