Can You Identify this Plant? [Plant ID Project]

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posted on Jun, 5 2011 @ 02:25 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
And here's a fresh batch of plants to ID...


This looks like Petasites albus?
 




 



Im guessing Papaver rhoeas comon papaver?




posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


Yep Digitalis is quite deadly - and very common over here in Europe. Interestingly when looking into the plant I read -



There have been instances of people confusing digitalis with the relatively harmless Symphytum (comfrey) plant (which is often brewed into a tea) with fatal consequences. Other fatal accidents involve children drinking the water in a vase containing digitalis plants. Drying does not reduce the toxicity of the plant. The plant is toxic to animals including all classes of livestock and poultry, as well as felids and canids
en.wikipedia.org...

something to bear in mind when foraging.
edit on 11-6-2011 by Silk because: accreditation



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by Silk
 


I knew that tea you all drink over there was deadly

I KNEW IT




posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 

The blue groundcovering flowers are I believe called Blue Daise- my mother has some in her yard. I've seen the pink flowering trees but I just can't recall what it is at this time. White flowers are definitely Dogwood, and they can be found growing wild in the woods. If you want to transplant baby Dogwood trees from woods to your yard you need to mark them in the fall (around October is best) and go back and dig them up for transplant in early spring. If you don't mark them you will never be able to find them in the spring until it's too late to transplant.



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Never touch the stuff *cough honest .....

Course today has all been French Coffee - the type beginning with Stella ....

Now to get the thread back on track - Loved seeing the teasles - as aa kid we would knot the stalks over the the stem and pull back - ready made missiles!

And the dandelion was known to me as a child as an "O'clock" you tell the time by blowing the seeds off - One O'Clock etc - but the plant make a great fizzy drink when coupled with Burdock - Dandelion and Burdock - kind of like an English Dr Pepper



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 05:25 AM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


Ah, God bless you Jack! You know how to alleviate my boredom!
NEw pix ::dances around::
Hokay, lessee..
#1 Common Mallow (Malva neglecta) The fruits are edible and quite tasty btw.
#2 Bladder campion (Silene cucubulus)
#3 some type of Poppy
#4 Common Speedwell (Veronica officinalis)
#5 Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias quadrifolia)
#6 Bowmans root (Gilenia trifoliata)

Everytime you put up new pictures feels like christmas to me.



posted on Jun, 26 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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edit on 2011/6/26 by sbctinfantry because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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What a fantastic thread !

I will have to attempt to upload some pics of my own.



For plants that you may know the name of but would like to learn more about. i.e. edible,medicinal, poisons, dyes etc.

A resource that my prove handy ( E.U and U.S)

Plants For A Future : 7000 Edible, Medicinal & Useful Plants (complete with pictures)


A truly incredible database- definitely worth checking out.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by UmbraSumus
For plants that you may know the name of but would like to learn more about. i.e. edible,medicinal, poisons, dyes etc.

A resource that my prove handy ( E.U and U.S)

Plants For A Future : 7000 Edible, Medicinal & Useful Plants (complete with pictures)


A truly incredible database- definitely worth checking out.


Thanks for posting that! Like you, I've got a mystery plant that I need to upload a photo of. It's something that is puzzling our local plant expert -- showed up in our dying ponds.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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Okay... here's mine.

This plant has a thick stem that feels hollow but is tough to break (haven't broken one in half), leaves have leaflets (as you see) and the pattern is alternate (not opposite.) The plant appears to grow up to 4 feet high, but might grow higher.

These are appearing in the beds of the drying ponds. They're not one of the common invasives or common local plants. They grow quickly -- at an apparent rate of about a foot a week.



Suggestions?



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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Identified the plant (whined at local expert until they responded) -- Sesbane herbaceae (Sesbane, coffee bean, Bequille.) It's been seen on the property before. Must look up more about the thing.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Good deal, that one had me stumped..

here's a couple of links for that plant..

plants.usda.gov...

www.invasive.org...



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by AnteBellum
I tried everything to figure this one out, but couldn't come to a conclusion.
I love threads like this. Here is one for you:



A very adaptable plant, there are a bunch of these near by my home right now. (Not actual picture)

BTW is that a dogwood tree.
edit on 4/9/2011 by AnteBellum because: (no reason given)


The cone flower you posted may be one of the varieties of "mexican hat".
Just noticed that nobody has yet identified the cactus on the first (second?) page. It's prickly pear cactus. Edible and medicinal.

I love this thread! Wish I'd found it sooner.
edit on 4-10-2011 by whitewave because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Here's one that I haven't identified yet..



Isn't that dock? You rip off a leaf and rub it on your nettle stings and it takes the pain away.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by wigit
 



Not that one, that one is "common teasel"..

There are a couple of pics of dock in the thread though, and it does work well for stings or insect bites.. just crumble up the leaf til it's mushy then place on the affected area.. I used dock a couple of times this past spring



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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I hate quoting a quote, but in this case it's necessary. I apologize in advance. Silk, you're right. It's the Wiki article that's wrong.
I have grown both digitalis (foxglove) and symphytum officinale (common comfrey)
While both plants have a curling stem of flowers that are somewhat bell shaped, that's where the similarity ends. Foxglove flowers can get big enough for me to stick my thumb in them. I've never seen a comfrey flower larger than 1 cm long. Digitalis was used medicinally in extremely small doses to treat heart problems that no other medicines could treat. Overdoses stop the heart. An overdose can be a miniscule amount. And yet, people grow foxglove all over the place, and deaths are extremely rare.

Originally posted by Silk
reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


Yep Digitalis is quite deadly - and very common over here in Europe. Interestingly when looking into the plant I read -



There have been instances of people confusing digitalis with the relatively harmless Symphytum (comfrey) plant (which is often brewed into a tea) with fatal consequences. Other fatal accidents involve children drinking the water in a vase containing digitalis plants. Drying does not reduce the toxicity of the plant. The plant is toxic to animals including all classes of livestock and poultry, as well as felids and canids
en.wikipedia.org...

something to bear in mind when foraging.
edit on 11-6-2011 by Silk because: accreditation



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by intergalactic fire

Originally posted by JacKatMtn
And here's a fresh batch of plants to ID...


This looks like Petasites albus?
 




edit on 12-10-2011 by whitewave because: N/M. Looks like AskThe Animals answered it. (Thanks, btw)



posted on Nov, 22 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 
Wisteria .
Mine are the more common lavender color.


Flowers hang like grapes. Very hard to eradicate if you don't want them.
edit on Tue Nov 22 2011 by Jbird because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2012 @ 07:25 AM
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So this thread is a year old... is anyone still interested in new additions? New year, new members and all.... ?



posted on May, 29 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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Bring them on.






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