hydrogen education

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posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by movetovanuatu
 




As far as I'm aware, the main problem is storage. It's a very volatile gas, it's just DYING to get together with oxygen to make water, which resultsin an exothermic reaction.... bang.... big bang.


You are absolutely right. This is why we must never let the government do it their way. They wish to have hydrogen stations where you can fill up for pay, like gasoline. You would fill a tank on your car. The safe way to do it is to produce the hydrogen onboard the vehicle, like I do with my HHO reactor. The only oxygen/hydrogen mixture there is in one line from the reactor to the intake. Even in a crash, which would produce a dead short, a small 5 amp fuse in enough protection. Hauling around a tank full of hydrogen would be like driving a bomb.




posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by autowrench
reply to post by movetovanuatu
 




As far as I'm aware, the main problem is storage. It's a very volatile gas, it's just DYING to get together with oxygen to make water, which resultsin an exothermic reaction.... bang.... big bang.


You are absolutely right. This is why we must never let the government do it their way. They wish to have hydrogen stations where you can fill up for pay, like gasoline. You would fill a tank on your car. {1}The safe way to do it is to produce the hydrogen onboard the vehicle, like I do with my HHO reactor.{2} The only oxygen/hydrogen mixture there is in one line from the reactor to the intake. Even in a crash, which would produce a dead short, a small 5 amp fuse in enough protection. Hauling around a tank full of hydrogen would be like driving a bomb.


{1}

Why do you bother running your HHO reactor with gasoline.... If it works so well, why not run your car completely on Hydrogen?




{2}

Proposed hydrides for use in a hydrogen economy include simple hydrides of magnesium[11] or transition metals and complex metal hydrides, typically containing sodium, lithium, or calcium and aluminium or boron. Hydrides chosen for storage applications provide low reactivity (high safety) and high hydrogen storage densities. Leading candidates are Lithium hydride, sodium borohydride, lithium aluminium hydride and ammonia borane.
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posted on May, 4 2011 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by movetovanuatu
As far as I'm aware, the main problem is storage. It's a very volatile gas, it's just DYING to get together with oxygen to make water, which resultsin an exothermic reaction.... bang.... big bang.


Storage and safety isn't really a problem. Storage and transportation can be done in the form of hydrides. In fact, using metal hydrides for storage is up to six times more efficient than storage of the pure gas.

Source: Hydrogen Storage

A popular idea is that cars would pull up to "hydrogen refueling stations", simply pull out the old hydride cylinder, and replace it with a "full" one. The old hydride cylinders could be reused hundreds (or even thousands) of times, by simply transporting them to the hydrogen source and placing them in a hydrogen gas environment for a few minutes.

With a little research, this could become highly efficient. Of course, the biggest problem is generating the hydrogen.



edit on 4/5/2011 by Saurus because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2011 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by mcsteve
Thats not the problem though, the problem is that (from my understanding) it takes more energy to split the hydrogen from the salt water than the energy produced by splitting the hydrogen from the water. Yes using solar power is a renewable way to produce the power, but it will take more solar power in than the power out, making it pointless


Why do you all keep saying this? I have a 1990 Chevy G-20 van with a 350 V-8 engine. Stock it gets about 14 mpg. In this day and age of high gas prices, this van is not practical to drive, is it? About two years ago I sent off for a HHO Generator. A simply quart Mason jar with a plastic lid, one 3/8 vacuum outlet, one vent, and two holes for electrodes. I use two 5/16 stainless bolts with stainless wire, three wires twisted together around the bolts, one is Positive, the other Negative. In the jar I mix 2 ml of urine, that's right, pee, and fill the rest with clean water, I use natural spring water myself. Bring this to almost a boil on the stove, and add one tablespoon of Arm & Hammer baking soda, stir until dissolved. Turn on the switch, and you can see the bubbles come up, they even push up the tube that goes to the PCV port. The engine runs clean, the tailpipe is perfectly clean, not a trace of carbon. the engine runs better, quieter, and now gets 20 mpg constant, 30 mpg on a good day, wet, moist, not to many hills, and on a really good day it gets 40 mpg. I used to listed to the people always saying this don't work, but I thought to myself, "what if they are full of it?" You can say it doesn't work all you want. I will just laugh as I cruise past the gas station.
HERE is a kit like I bought.
Does it work? Damn right it works, saves us over $200 a month in gasoline. Is it easy to maintain? Not really. The electrolyte mix wears out after 100-150 miles, and must be replenished. A dirty, stinky brown substance collects in the jar, this comes right out with vinegar and a brush. Do the electrodes last long? No. After only a few uses, the nickel is eaten away from the bolts, and then the acids begin to eat the bolts themselves. this system is not for the lazy. But it does work really well.





 
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