Is The Ancient Alchemy Symbol For Mercury Really On The Planet Mercury?

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posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:21 PM
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I started a thread called NASA Releases First Orbit Captured Image Of Mercury on 3-29-2011.

It shows the crater Debussy.

On gazing at it today I noticed something peculiar.

Thoughts?



Original






Cropped - Rotated - Color Inverted






Cropped - Color Inverted - Rotated - Contrast 63







Alchemical Symbol






edit on 31-3-2011 by timewalker because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Sorry, you will have to circle that for me. I simply don't see it.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:30 PM
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I do and it's very weird that - Very observant! S&F



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:30 PM
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Wow. Its really there! Nice find...although I personally believe its a coincidence. Still doesnt mean its not there. Because it clearly is.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by timewalker
 


Yeah, seems to be there.

It's probably on a few million other planets too, and I bet you could also find every other symbol for each planet of our solar system on mercury too.

Thanks for the pics.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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Looks a lot like the moon, I am guessing the composition is going to be fairly close if not identical.

And I can see the symbol as well, doesn't take a great stretch of imagination, just have to use it a little to see.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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Would you mind to trace over the surface the symbol you see, because I am still not seeing it...
edit on 31-3-2011 by AnitaCigarette because: *change of words



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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Originally posted by AnitaCigarette
Would you mind to trace over the surface the symbol you see, because I am still not seeing it...
edit on 31-3-2011 by AnitaCigarette because: *change of words


Look for a large and unnaturally perfect cross (plus "+" sign) taking up most of the bottom half of the last picture.
The large creator, not perfectly centered at the top of the "cross"/plus sign would be the round circle "head" and you can imagine that two of the crater's rays make the upturned half circle.

The oddest part about this to me is simply the presence of the perfect plus "+" sign. Two lines of the same length, perfectly horizontal and vertical.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by 0001391
 
That's pretty much what I would say.

If you notice the debris ejection a the top of the circle, If you look closely, it seems to make a black crescent at the base of the "horns", more like the symbol.

The resemblance is uncanny to me.

I don't need to say that the symbol was around long before the telescope, do I?



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by timewalker
 


I can see what you mean but it does require some imagination! Without seeing the actual symbol as reference you wouldn't naturally see that pattern...still, good catch



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by bluestones
 
I got plenty of that "imagination" stuff to go around.


I put the symbol last so the viewer would not be corrupted.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by nerbot
 





From The Opus medico-chymicum - Johann Mylius - 1618



When you see any of these strewn across the landscape for a thousand miles or more on any of the other planets, let me know.




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by 0001391

Originally posted by AnitaCigarette
Would you mind to trace over the surface the symbol you see, because I am still not seeing it...
edit on 31-3-2011 by AnitaCigarette because: *change of words


Look for a large and unnaturally perfect cross (plus "+" sign) taking up most of the bottom half of the last picture.
The large creator, not perfectly centered at the top of the "cross"/plus sign would be the round circle "head" and you can imagine that two of the crater's rays make the upturned half circle.

The oddest part about this to me is simply the presence of the perfect plus "+" sign. Two lines of the same length, perfectly horizontal and vertical.


Still hardly find any resemblance & it does not look like it was intelligently placed there. & it also doesn't look like an equal cross was put there. I think you are looking too hard at the picture.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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I'm sorry, I don't see it at all

I looked at the bottom of the picture and everything, but I see nothing.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by AnitaCigarette
 
My thing about it is, not that it was put there intelligently or not, but that intelligent people might have known this a long time ago as an identifier?

The telescope was "invented" in 1608.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by 0001391
 





The oddest part about this to me is simply the presence of the perfect plus "+" sign. Two lines of the same length, perfectly horizontal and vertical.


I saw another image the other day and uploaded it. The 'cross' appears to be debris from the crater at the northern hemisphere.

What a pummeling.



Wait Wait............






I digress. Could not help it.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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Ok. I just love looking into stuff. Obviously.

Some of you might find this interesting.

If not, I just add stuff for later reference for myself.

Lets see who Debussy is that the crater is named after.


Claude Debussy



WIKI


Claude-Achille Debussy (French pronunciation: [klod aʃil dəbysi])[1][2] (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures working within the field of impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions.[3] Debussy is among the most important of all French composers, and a central figure in European music of the turn of the 20th century. He was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903.

[4] His music is noted for its sensory component and for not often forming around one key or pitch.



Claude Debussy was born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, August 22, 1862



Given that Debussy's music is apparently so concerned with mood and colour, one may be surprised to discover that, according to Howat, many of his greatest works appear to have been structured around mathematical models even while using an apparent classical structure such as sonata form. Howat suggests that some of Debussy's pieces can be divided into sections that reflect the golden ratio, frequently by using the numbers of the standard Fibonacci sequence.[26] Sometimes these divisions seem to follow the standard divisions of the overall structure. In other pieces they appear to mark out other significant features of the music. The 55 bar-long introduction to 'Dialogue du vent et la mer' in La mer, for example, breaks down into 5 sections of 21, 8, 8, 5 and 13 bars in length. The golden mean point of bar 34 in this structure is signalled by the introduction of the trombones, with the use of the main motif from all three movements used in the central section around that point.[26][page needed]

The only evidence that Howat introduces to support his claim appears in changes Debussy made between finished manuscripts and the printed edition, with the changes invariably creating a Golden Mean proportion where previously none existed. Perhaps the starkest example of this comes with La cathédrale engloutie. Published editions lack the instruction to play bars 7-12 and 22-83 at twice the speed of the remainder, exactly as Debussy himself did on a piano-roll recording. When analysed with this alteration, the piece follows Golden Section proportions. At the same time, Howat admits that in many of Debussy's works, he has been unable to find evidence of the Golden Section (notably in the late works) and that no extant manuscripts or sketches contain any evidence of calculations related to it.




To go a little deeper his and Maurice Ravel' (I love Bolero) field of Impressionist music.


The impressionist movement in music was a movement in European classical music, mainly in France, that began in the late nineteenth century and continued into the middle of the twentieth century.



While this era was characterized by a dramatic use of the major and minor scale system, Impressionist music tends to make more use of dissonance and more uncommon scales such as the whole tone scale.


Consonance and Dissonance


Physiological basis of dissonance Musical styles are similar to languages, in that certain physical, physiological, and neurological facts create bounds that greatly affect the development of all languages. Nevertheless, different cultures and traditions have incorporated the possibilities and limitations created by these physical and neurological facts into vastly different, living systems of human language. Neither the importance of the underlying facts nor the importance of the culture in assigning a particular meaning to the underlying facts should be understated. For instance, two notes played simultaneously but with slightly different frequencies produce a beating "wah-wah-wah" sound that is very audible. Musical styles such as traditional European classical music consider this effect to be objectionable ("out of tune") and go to great lengths to eliminate it. Other musical styles such as Indonesian gamelan consider this sound to be an attractive part of the musical timbre and go to equally great lengths to create instruments that have this slight "roughness" as a feature of their sound (Vassilakis, 2005).



In Western music, dissonance is the quality of sounds that seems "unstable" and has an aural "need" to "resolve" to a "stable" consonance. Both consonance and dissonance are words applied to harmony, chords, and intervals and, by extension, to melody, tonality, and even rhythm and metre. Although there are physical and neurological facts important to understanding the idea of dissonance, the precise definition of dissonance is culturally conditioned — definitions of and conventions of usage related to dissonance vary greatly among different musical styles, traditions, and cultures. Nevertheless, the basic ideas of dissonance, consonance, and resolution exist in some form in all musical traditions that have a concept of melody, harmony, or tonality.



Relaxation and tension have been used as analogy since the time of Aristotle till the present (Kliewer, p. 290).



In early Renaissance music, intervals such as the perfect fourth were considered dissonances that must be immediately resolved.



Physiological basis of dissonance

Musical styles are similar to languages, in that certain physical, physiological, and neurological facts create bounds that greatly affect the development of all languages. Nevertheless, different cultures and traditions have incorporated the possibilities and limitations created by these physical and neurological facts into vastly different, living systems of human language. Neither the importance of the underlying facts nor the importance of the culture in assigning a particular meaning to the underlying facts should be understated.

For instance, two notes played simultaneously but with slightly different frequencies produce a beating "wah-wah-wah" sound that is very audible. Musical styles such as traditional European classical music consider this effect to be objectionable ("out of tune") and go to great lengths to eliminate it. Other musical styles such as Indonesian gamelan consider this sound to be an attractive part of the musical timbre and go to equally great lengths to create instruments that have this slight "roughness" as a feature of their sound (Vassilakis, 2005).



In human hearing, the varying effect of simple ratios may be perceived by one of these mechanisms:

Fusion or pattern matching: fundamentals may be perceived through pattern matching of the separately analyzed partials to a best-fit exact-harmonic template (Gerson & Goldstein, 1978) or the best-fit subharmonic (Terhardt, 1974), or harmonics may be perceptually fused into one entity, with dissonances being those intervals less likely to be mistaken for unisons, the imperfect intervals, because of the multiple estimates, at perfect intervals, of fundamentals, for one harmonic tone (Terhardt, 1974). By these definitions, inharmonic partials of otherwise harmonic spectra are usually processed separately (Hartmann et al., 1990), unless frequency or amplitude modulated coherently with the harmonic partials (McAdams, 1983). For some of these definitions, neural firing supplies the data for pattern matching; see directly below (e.g., Moore, 1989; pp. 183–187; Srulovicz & Goldstein, 1983).

Period length or neural-firing coincidence: with the length of periodic neural firing created by two or more waveforms, higher simple numbers creating longer periods or lesser coincidence of neural firing and thus dissonance (Patternson, 1986; Boomsliter & Creel, 1961; Meyer, 1898; Roederer, 1973, pp. 145-149). Purely harmonic tones cause neural firing exactly with the period or some multiple of the pure tone.


432Hz Anyone? I am no music theorist, but I have a hunch.



432Hz Validated



Turn your volume down for this one.




Any way that is one interesting crater.



edit on 31-3-2011 by timewalker because: (no reason given)
edit on 31-3-2011 by timewalker because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-4-2011 by timewalker because: arghh.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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Been looking for 15 min and I still see nothing
can you possibly outline it or circle it please? Sorry that I cannot see it. I feel left out.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by timewalker
 


Im sorry but it looks like a big ole sphincter. I could see if all the planets had their corresponding symbols etched in their faces, it might be something, but for now it is just a big upskirt of mercury, and I think imercury is represented as a male. Yuch


I wanted to apologize for the tone i felt from my post. i just re-read it and it sounded a little stand-off-ish. I meant no disrespect, it just seemed funnier when I was typing it out.
edit on 1-4-2011 by eazyriderl_l because: to apololgize



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:59 PM
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Took me a minute to see it, but I do see it clearly. Very interesting. Sure the actual symbol isn't proportional to what's on the planet, but I don't think it was meant to be an accurate recreation, but more of a stylized representation.

Gotta love the folks who refuse to see it though. Just like a thread I made elsewhere about the hexagonal craters on the moon, people just refused to see it. Even though there were plenty of harvard and nasa papers proposing explanations for the hexagons.





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