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SCI/TECH: Weather - Freak 10 Story Waves

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posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 03:11 PM
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The mystery may have been solved of why in the last 20 years about 200 ships that were 200m long have "disappeared."
 



news.bbc.co.uk
In the last 20 years, more than 200 cargo ships over 200m long have been lost at sea. Witnesses say many sunk by huge waves rising out of calm seas.

Scientists dismissed the reports until European Space Agency satellites saw 10 waves up to 30m high in three weeks.

The scientists are now trying to find out what causes the whopping waves.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I hope those waves stay off shore because that's not something most sane people would want to surf. I wonder if anyone has statistics of the disappearance of these ships to see if the frequency is increasing. Imagine being on a cruse ship and seeing one of those, it might be the last thing you see.

[edit on 7-23-2004 by Valhall]




posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 03:15 PM
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this was posted already --- over here

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 03:18 PM
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posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 04:25 PM
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You can actually have the same story running in ATSNN and ATS, so there is no problem there. This report is indeed important and it was not reported by anyone else on ATSNN.



posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 04:54 PM
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Actually being on a cruiseship with waves that high would be incredible, just think if the captain could face the bow of the boat as a surfer could with his board woooo hoooo hang 10 and enjoy the ride of your life. In all reality a 30m wave would be any true surfers wet dream... no offense ladies.



posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by Justmytype
Actually being on a cruiseship with waves that high would be incredible, just think if the captain could face the bow of the boat as a surfer could with his board woooo hoooo hang 10 and enjoy the ride of your life. In all reality a 30m wave would be any true surfers wet dream... no offense ladies.


1) I think if they find this has anything to do with intense magnetic fields it could potentially explain events in the bermuda triangle phenomena.

2) it's every surfers dream until they hit the under toe



posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 09:29 PM
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This is actually VERY old news.. I saw a documentary on the Discovery channel over a year and a half ago, and at the time the documentary wasn't new.

If you were to assign a numerical value to the power of a wave, then run it across other waves, each with their own values, about once in every 100 million run-ins, with 'average', calm waves, waves stack. So, in an area of 100 square kilometers, every second there are over 200,000 wave-hits every second. In 3 weeks, there's 362,880,000,000 wave-hits. That's 362 Billion, 880 Million. That accounts for 362,880 stacks. Ironically enough, the higher the value of the wave, the likelier it is to stack, so for these stacked waves, there is about a 1 in 10,000 probability of stacking, leaving us about 36 double-stacked, following the exponential sort of stacking, there's going to be usually 4-8 triple stacked, 2-3 quadruple, and 1 quintuple stack, now, these are giant waves. My numbers aren't exact, so I'm sorry, I can't give an exact detail on how this works the way it does, but it has to do with resonant frequencies. Inside a closed space, sounds at certain frequencies are magnified greatly, because the ripples in the air occasionally 'stack up', creating a louder noise. It only happens at certain pitches because depending on the size of the room, they take a certain amount of time to get to the wall and bounce back, and if the noise you make is at the right pitch, it'll stack with the echo bouncing back, and you'll have a resonance. Same deal with the waves, they occasionally resonate, some areas are very prone to resonation, like the area just south of Africa and to the west. Because of the massive cold front that continuously sits off of the coast, massive storms are frequent, and the flows of water oppose the flow of the wind, creating an abnormally high amount of wave-hits, and leaving an abnormally high amount of lage wave-stacks.

Really. Discovery Channel. Last Year.



posted on Jul, 23 2004 @ 11:46 PM
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The best part of the Disovery special was the actual concrete evidence taken from the North Sea. Basically all the scientists were of the opinion that killer waves couldn't arise essentially out of nowhere. All of the eyewitnesses had to be drunk or on an adrenaline rush or had to be exaggerating. But there's this oil platform out in the North Sea that has this instrument to record wwave height and to make a long story short they have recorded gargantuan waves that would sink any ship no matter how large the vessel. I think everyone has seen wierd things when it comes to wind and water. I was just out fishin the other weekend and it was dead calm one minute and than literlally three minutes later it was life threatening experience. There's even people who swear it's happened on the Great Lakes. Bottom line: Waves Suck and They;ll kill you and everyone you care about.



posted on Jul, 24 2004 @ 12:13 AM
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I'm not sure that it has been established that waveform resonance is the sole cause of monster waves.

This article suggests other possible (and I would say additional) causes such as current interactions and weather effects that might also contribute to giant waves.

Further study will hopefully give us a better idea regarding all the factors behind this phenomenon.



posted on Jul, 24 2004 @ 12:22 AM
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Could the Burmuda Triangle cause many more of these waves and that it could be a reason why many ships and boats are lost there......

But i guess that doesn't account for the aircraft as well.. ;P



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 03:14 PM
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I've worked in the maritime industry for 10 years now and I've been in some bad ones off the East and West Coasts of Canada. I've seen 60 - 70 foot waves and that was scarry enough. I was on a 660' ship and it still rocked us. Any surfer will tell you that wave sets come in definite sequences and that occasionally a larger wave will come with that set. Other factors such as wind fetch(area of water that wind can blow with no land around) can affect wave height. Bottom contours, for example if you're travelling from deeper oceans into port where shallower water will cause larger ground swells. Tide and currents also affect wave height. In Florida you can have gale force winds from the NW and the gulfstream flowing to the NW from the SE. You get wind from one direction, current from the opposite which produces large and steep wave fronts.

In all honesty, the oceans are just getting more dangerous. Storms these days are spontaneous, powerfull and do not allways move as predicted. The stakes in the job just went up.

[edit on 25-8-2004 by DEEZNUTZ]



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 04:25 PM
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One documentary on the Discovery channel proved that methane gas spontaneously erupting from the ocean floor could stop a plane's engine regardless of the altitude. They first focused on a specific squadron that all went down at the same time and upon analyzing the ocean floor with radar they found large holes in the vicinity (evidence of gas eruptions). Then they hooked up a vintage WWII plane engine to a controlled gas supply and showed that a fraction of a percent of methane in the air would cause the engine to die. This proves that many of the unexplaned plane crashes were caused by methane gas rising out of the ocean floor and contaminating the air to the extent that the planes literally fell out of the sky.

They claimed the same thing could knock a boat over, because gas could errupt from directly beneath a boat and tip it.

Probably not the full explanation, but a start. Combine that with large wave anomolies and you could theoretically explain nearly all bermuda accidents.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 06:03 PM
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I thought those megawaves were caused by undersea landslides. I remember reports about an island in the Pacific where millions of cubic feet of earth sheared off and caused huge waves in Japan a thousand or so miles away. I wish I could remember more of the details..

As for Bermuda, wasn't that methane gas rising from the seafloor that caused bouyancy to drop and changed air pressure so much that planes would fall out of the sky?

Perhaps I've been watching too much of the Discovery Channel.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by RedBalloon
As for Bermuda, wasn't that methane gas rising from the seafloor that caused bouyancy to drop and changed air pressure so much that planes would fall out of the sky?

Perhaps I've been watching too much of the Discovery Channel.


In the analysis I saw they fed methane directly into the carburator of a WWII airplane engine and it died with extremely low amounts of methane. I don't think it had much to do with air pressure because the amount was so insignificant. The gas just caused the fuel to stop combusting.



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