Lets try to get this fact clear - Amateur Astronomers Spotting NIBIRU

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posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by gem_man
reply to post by heineken
 


There are different kinds of telescopes. You would use a solar telescope in the morning as it is designed specifically to view the sun. I happen to be an amateur astronomer. I have 5 telescopes, two of them computerized and the largest has an objective is an eleven inches. I must tell you that as yet I have seen nothing that would be considered a threat to earth. There MAY be a companion brown dwarf star to our sun, then again there may NOT be one. The evidence is not yet clear and there has not to my knowledge been any sighting by any astronomer. Now I have seen all the videos showing "something" on the video. My thought is if it can be seen with a video camera it shoulfd definitely be visible in a telescope, and it is not.


how can you compare viewing the Sun to a faint distant object?? you didnt understand my intentions sry




posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by NyxOne
Venus is easily visible with the right equipment, and at least one person said he could see it until almost noon. I'd also think they'd use appropriate filters.


That was me. To be fair, it was 6 or 8 weeks ago, when Venus was really bright, and a long way from the Sun. It was probably 30 degrees or so up from the horizon at sunrise, and it was a simple matter to check it periodically, knowing where it ought to be. It got a lot harder to find after about 10 am, and I couldn't find it in the glare at all after 11:38 am. By then it was pretty high in the sky. It should have been easier to see, since there was less atmosphere for the light to have to punch through, but the glare from the sun finally got it all the same. I have no doubt that with the appropriate filters and a telescope or pair of 7x50 binoculars I could have seen it for probably 3 hours more before it got too low in the west.





wow..thanks for showing up
appreciate that

do you think its easy to find a distant faint object with unknown location during daytime?

thanks ^^



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


i was waiting something with your experience in the subject..

is there a place where it will be difficult to locate an object either by day or night?



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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And you can even see Mercury during sunrise, so why not Nibiru. Mercury is dark planet too, barely reflects any light.

Mercury is that object between moon and brightest planet Venus. And its still visible, even though its really small.


If there is Nibiru, it would be bigger than Jupiter. Lot bigger.
edit on 29-3-2011 by Thebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by heineken

so your source is one person here who saw it till noon...

and my source was from :

Sources
"British Astronomical Association Observing Guide" (BAA, Piccadilly, London, 1995).
"Norton's 2000.0" edited by Ian Ridpath (Longman Group UK Ltd., Harlow, 1989).
"Celestron 8 Instruction Manual" (Celestron International, Torrance, CA, 1994).

dude..get a job


That "one person" has a university education in Astronomy and Physics, University of North Carolina, 1993. My concentration was on mapping local stars. For that I had to be very familiar with distances, angles (to include spherical trigonometry) and the properties of stars and stellar bodies (from red and brown dwarves, all the way up to class O1a). I also studied the relative concentrations of the various classes of stars in the local neighborhood so that I could construct theoretical models of the distribution of them in space. I had to know about how all those different sorts of stars radiate in different parts of the spectrum, because that's how they are classified, and it had a direct bearing on taking a census of the stellar population.

I may be an amateur, but I'm not a novice, and I'm telling you flat out that there is no such body as "Nibiru" in the places it is claimed for it to be. It's possible for one to be on the far outer edge of the solar system, and be yet undetected, but every day that goes by decreases that likelihood. We have found brown dwarves in the Orion Nebula. If we can find them that far away, it's vanishingly unlikely (although not impossible at this point) for one to be hiding from us right in our own solar system. Even then, it would have to be FAR away in the outer reaches, and could pose absolutely NO credible danger to us of itself at all. The only potential possibility of any sort of problem from it would be if it were to dislodge a comet from the Oort cloud, and fling it inward toward the inner solar system.

A brown dwarf < 4.6 billion years old (the age of the solar system) would still be radiating heat, and most likely still be generating heat from gravitational pressures within itself. If it radiates heat, it can and would have been found in the infrared.




pls dont get offended ...he did not mention any qualifications you have...ok..peace and apologies bro ^^ if you ever need something like a software application i'm a C++ and .Net programmer ..i might make you some tools


i replied ythat way since i knew its hard during daytime whilst they quoted you saying it was a piece of cake

are we clear?



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by heineken

wow..thanks for showing up
appreciate that


Your welcome. I just got off work at 06:30 here, and got home to rejoin. Sorry 'bout the delay, but ya gotta make a buck somehow!




do you think its easy to find a distant faint object with unknown location during daytime?

thanks ^^


Easy, no, but possible, yes. Those parameters are pretty vague, and would need to be firmed up to get a better idea. How far distant, and what sort of object? As I said before, if it's more than 1 AU, and outside the Earth's orbit, I'd most likely just wait a few weeks and look for it at night to make the observation easier.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
reply to post by nenothtu
 


i was waiting something with your experience in the subject..

is there a place where it will be difficult to locate an object either by day or night?



Not really a place, except in exactly the Earths orbit and exactly on the opposite side of the sun. In an orbit like that, we'd never have anything at all to worry about, because it could never "catch" the Earth - it would have exactly the same orbit, but 180 degrees away. Any other orbit would make it visible at some other time. Orbits outside the Earth's would be visible at some point during the night, and orbits far enough in that they would never be seen at night would be seen transiting the solar disc during daylight observations of the sun (searching for sunspots and the like), and could not cross the Earth's orbit either inward or outward without being seen at night.

Orbits like the one claimed for Nibiru are the same kind of orbits that comets have - highly elliptical, and coming from the outer solar system inward, looping around the sun, and going back outward again. We see comets at night on both the inward and outward legs of their journey.

The problem with a body the size of Nibiru following an orbit like that is that it would wreak havoc on the planets of the inner solar system as it passed by, and they would have all been flung out long ago. If Nibiru existed, we would not. The Earth would have been long gone. Remember, the solar system is around 4,6 billion years old. Divided by the postulated 3600 year elliptical orbit, that equates to a whole lot of orbital passes in which to have dislodged all the planets in the inner solar system. It only takes one pass.

That's why planets can't orbit binary stars unless they are very, very close together or very, very far apart. In the first case, it's possible for planets to orbit BOTH stars at a certain distance - any closer and the planetary orbits become unstable. In the second case, each star could have it's own solar system, but then the outer orbits are what would be unstable, being affected by the other star.

Edit to add: with a 3600 year orbit, Nibiru would have completed 1,278,000 (+/-, roughly) orbits in the 4.6 billion year history of the solar system. Any ONE of those could have made us not be here, if it were there.



edit on 2011/3/29 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 




Not really a place, except in exactly the Earths orbit and exactly on the opposite side of the sun. In an orbit like that, we'd never have anything at all to worry about, because it could never "catch" the Earth - it would have exactly the same orbit, but 180 degrees away. Any other orbit would make it visible at some other time.


I said the is on page 6.

Wondering why the question is still being asked...

edit on 29/3/11 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
pls dont get offended ...he did not mention any qualifications you have...ok..peace and apologies bro ^^ if you ever need something like a software application i'm a C++ and .Net programmer ..i might make you some tools


i replied ythat way since i knew its hard during daytime whilst they quoted you saying it was a piece of cake

are we clear?


No problem. I wasn't offended, I just thought it might be best to qualify myself. I'm not an astronomer, although I've been trained to be one. Tight job market there, you know? They should have told me that ahead of time...


Eh, I mostly did it for the fun of it and out of curiosity anyhow, rather than looking for a job in the field. Takes all the fun out of a hobby when you HAVE to work at it.


On the matter of Venus, in that case it WAS a piece of cake, until the solar glare got it. That's because I knew approximately where to look, and periodically checked on it to see if I could still see it with my eyes and nothing else. In all fairness, Venus was the brightest thing in the sky at the time, other than the sun.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
i still dont think that amateur astronomers can locate an unknown far faint object during daytime



Don't be such a nonce. You never mentioned a far faint object.

Infact your words....


If Nibiru/Planet X is close to the Sun and visible in the morning can an amateur astronomer still point out his telescope and see everything clear?


And you have been proven wrong time and time again.
If you are going to continuously change your story then you need to make what it is exactly you are talking about clear in the OP, u2u a mod and get the to edit it because as of now anytime you talk you just make yourself look incredibly stupid.

This thread should of been locked or moved to HOAX before it ever started.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by nenothtu
 




Not really a place, except in exactly the Earths orbit and exactly on the opposite side of the sun. In an orbit like that, we'd never have anything at all to worry about, because it could never "catch" the Earth - it would have exactly the same orbit, but 180 degrees away. Any other orbit would make it visible at some other time.


I said the is on page 6.

Wondering why the question is still being asked...



I think it's a matter of convincing. It helps to have a basic understanding of orbits as well, at least to the point of understanding that "close" orbits happen faster, and "far" orbits happen slower. In the matter of a closer-in orbit, it would zip along out of sync with Earth's orbit, and so we could see it pass the sun, right across the face of it, maybe more than once a year. As I recall, Mercury and Venus have a 2:3 resonance in orbits, meaning that for every two orbits of Venus, Mercury has 3 orbits, like clockwork. Since Mercury zips along relatively fast, from Venus you'd see a transit of Mercury across the sun every 2/3 of a year. Likewise, from Earth we see BOTH Mercury and Venus transit across the sun, although I don't recall how often that is. Naturally, of there were anything else in that direction, we would see it transit the sun every so often as well.

If it were outward from us, we would see it at some times of the year, and not at others as our orbit overtook the slower outward orbits, as happens with Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. I think it's safe to say that anything closer than Uranus, and at least as large, would have been found long ago, since Uranus was known to the ancients from naked eye observations. A brown dwarf would be quite a bit larger than Uranus, and so should be well known if it ever orbited any closer than that planet. Anything the size (mass-wise) of a brown dwarf, that ever crossed in any closer than Uranus, would have flung us out into the black of space long ago. It's the same principle that they use to give spacecraft gravity assists around planets to send them outward. The planet's gravity catches them, speeds them up by pulling them in a curve, then flings them out like a slingshot. Same thing happens with planets that get too close.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


I think he's got a legitimate question. He's trying to see if there's anywhere that a body the size of a "Nibiru" could be hiding - either close in or far out, where we couldn't find it. There may be such a place, but if there is, anything there couldn't be a danger to us, since it would have to move AWAY from there to get us - and then it would be seen, one way or the other.

It's not like a brown dwarf or even something only as big as a planet could sneak up on us and lower the boom.





edit on 2011/3/29 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


I have to agree. The belligerence in this thread is comical. I have to say I enjoyed watching someone self destruct in public but was confused seeing as he is a member since 2009. Not sure how he hung in for so long to be honest after watching this display of ignorance. I don't think there was even more then 2 post censors.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:49 AM
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reply to post by sputniksteve
 


Location: That other dimension

thank god..please hang there for a while will ya



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by sputniksteve
 


******not even worth the effort
edit on 29-3-2011 by heineken because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


the way of convincing is the way to go


still Chadwickus post helped me to understand a lot..but being an expert in the field i asked you too..so it with all due respect Chadwickus..2 sources better than 1



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
reply to post by sputniksteve
 


******not even worth the effort
edit on 29-3-2011 by heineken because: (no reason given)


Someone who called you out continues to call you out and you say that it's 'not even worth the effort'?

That's infantile.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


No he doesn't, he had a question in the OP based on his lack of knowledge. Fair enough, many people including the amature astronomers he was inferring too have tried to inform him otherwise. After 20 pages of calling everybody trolls and insulting people like he did with that last comment he just edited he now changes his tune.
What he seems to be arguing about now is so far away from the OP it's not funny.

If he started this thread out as "How to detect distant Brown Dwarfs?" then fair enough, but he didn't.
He has got his answers and doesn't like them.
A rude, crass little child who hasn't the slightest idea of what he is talking about.

Thread is a farce.

edit: @nyxone, he edited the post, it was originally an abusive post calling the person fat and ugly and he should eat better. The not worth the effort part was his edit.
Sounds like it is heinekin with the issues.
edit on 29-3-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


i was only concerned regarding nibiru..thats all..i wanted clarification..i wanted to be sure it is not on its way over here..and at least I assume we can all agree on the fact that Nasa referred to amateur astronomers as to debunk nibiru a lot and it was not doing the Job for me..sometimes i really thought Nibiru might even be real...with all these events happening in such a small period of time caught my ignorance on the subject unguarded

now i can estimate i'm 70% convinced it is not real

i just worry for my loved ones you know...i have a beautiful life which is wort to fight for..

in maltese we have a saying "bniedem ghavzat nofsu armat" which says that a well informed person is well armed



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


look at the second page...

both of you started trolling from the beginning


Care to retract your ignorant statement?


guess it would have been a lot different face to face trust me on this one..but people tend to turn superman after a 120$ monitor

you have no respect , you have been both very rude
edit on 29-3-2011 by heineken because: (no reason
given)


anybody can go back to page 2 and start from there and check out your childish approach
edit on 29-3-2011 by heineken because: (no reason given)





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