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Lets try to get this fact clear - Amateur Astronomers Spotting NIBIRU

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posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by WilcoRain
 


You are right it is just what happens when you point a non-filtered lens at the sun
Just your regular run of the mill overexposure causing the sensor to fail....




posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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Well explain this!!


2 suns,Ufos,some kind of blue beam radiating from the sun...this video has it all!



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by GodIsPissed
 


Those are just artifacts from the multiple lenses as per usual.....We see the same thing every single day on here. They are nothing new.....In fact I get the same thing all the time when taking pics/filming outdoors, as do 99.9% of anyone who points a camera at the sun lol.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by heineken
 


Lets get it clear Youtube videos of Nibiru taken with an iphone are not real!! now as for amatuer astronomers pictures well check it out here.

www.impactlab.net...

Image from site.



Amatuer astronomers are taking pictures now that a few years ago the pro's would have been happy with so if it was there one would have spotted it!!!



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 02:15 AM
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reply to post by GodIsPissed
 

Just listening to this idiot explain his video makes me embarrassed for him and his family. Such a loss of face.

Look, the world is full of people who believe odd things and who are easily fooled by the technology they wield that is more easily purchased than understood. This is just one more example.

edit on 2011-3-29 by JustSomeIdiot because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by heineken
 


I know what you're saying, and i'm no expert so take this with a pinch of salt, but you can observe during the early morning and during the day.

Most objects won't be visible of course, as their light is too faint and is swamped and lost in our suns light and the ideal conditions for viewing is at night, and as dark as possible, so the light from distant objects is not obscured and is as clear as possible.

Sometimes though, Venus will be visible very bright around dawn, and can be seen through a scope.

Sometimes too, you'll see our moon bright and lit in the daytime sky, and you can view that too during the day.

Ideally a filter of some type will be used, as the image will be bright a bit washed out, but you can still see celestial objects during the daytime hours, *provided* they are bright enough.

If the 'mystery' object is right next to the sun, unless it is very bright, i doubt it would be seen unless by something as sophisticated as SOHO. Someone with an amateur scope would probably not see as it would be swamped with sunlight, even if you covered the suns disk and used a filter, i would be surprised if it could be seen.

But i've only used my scope a handful of times, so i'm really not even close to knowing for sure.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 03:03 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 


You don't even need any filters for daytime viewing, filters can be used but it is more useful for the astrophotography side of things. The Moon for example shows incredible detail considering the light and it is not to washed out at all. The same for Venus and other stars, you just need to know where to point your telescope and it is as simple as that.
You should be able to view stars as well that are to the 3rd/4th magnitude or brighter.

Oh and before heineken starts rabbiting on about his 'special setup' again here is some info about the Hartmann mask in his picture and how to make one.
edit on 29-3-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 

Two comments:

  1. Please be very careful in pointing any telescope or binoculars anywhere near the sun unless you are using an appropriate solar filter - good way to end up with very compromised vision.
  2. An object that is apparently near the Sun from our current position in orbit cannot stay in that relative position for long as we move along our 186 million mile diameter orbit unless it is in a fairly circular orbit inside Mercury in which case it would be visible as it crosses the face of the Sun (note the cool photo of the ISS and Space Shuttle made recently). If it were in such an orbit and have any appreciable mass (say Mercury size or larger) I would imagine it's influence on Mercury would be fairly easily detected. And if it is in a fairly circular orbit I fail to see how it could impose any kind of threat to the earth



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 03:15 AM
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This is a good video of what may be Nibiru. Almost seems like what we have seen before in still images.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 03:20 AM
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reply to post by arbelisk
 

This embedded video seems to be broken.

Looking at the video I can't help but to think that he is just faking it, not to mention I question that the motion even shows what he is saying it shows (fake or not).

edit on 2011-3-29 by JustSomeIdiot because: (realized I should just use the YouTube Link)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 06:12 AM
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reply to post by heineken
 


There are different kinds of telescopes. You would use a solar telescope in the morning as it is designed specifically to view the sun. I happen to be an amateur astronomer. I have 5 telescopes, two of them computerized and the largest has an objective is an eleven inches. I must tell you that as yet I have seen nothing that would be considered a threat to earth. There MAY be a companion brown dwarf star to our sun, then again there may NOT be one. The evidence is not yet clear and there has not to my knowledge been any sighting by any astronomer. Now I have seen all the videos showing "something" on the video. My thought is if it can be seen with a video camera it shoulfd definitely be visible in a telescope, and it is not.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by GodIsPissed
Well explain this!!


2 suns,Ufos,some kind of blue beam radiating from the sun...this video has it all!


www.youtube.com...

Took all of two seconds.

Can I get a gold star? A cookie, perhaps, if you're feeling particularly generous?

It also moves, by the way. 3:58 to 4:01.
edit on 29-3-2011 by NyxOne because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-3-2011 by NyxOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
NyxOne ... you have been posting on this thread for about 24 hrs!!!..amazing

i have been to work, gym and slept and you kept on popping up...

if you are one person alone i suggest you review how your spending your time


And I suggest you learn how to argue and not just ignore what people say like a petulant infant, but beggars can't be choosers.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by Combatmed1
 

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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Originally posted by NyxOne
Venus is easily visible with the right equipment, and at least one person said he could see it until almost noon. I'd also think they'd use appropriate filters.


That was me. To be fair, it was 6 or 8 weeks ago, when Venus was really bright, and a long way from the Sun. It was probably 30 degrees or so up from the horizon at sunrise, and it was a simple matter to check it periodically, knowing where it ought to be. It got a lot harder to find after about 10 am, and I couldn't find it in the glare at all after 11:38 am. By then it was pretty high in the sky. It should have been easier to see, since there was less atmosphere for the light to have to punch through, but the glare from the sun finally got it all the same. I have no doubt that with the appropriate filters and a telescope or pair of 7x50 binoculars I could have seen it for probably 3 hours more before it got too low in the west.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by heineken
there is more than one source saying it is difficult to locate Venus during daytime..


It was very faint and difficult


blogs.discovermagazine.com...


although it can be difficult


science.nasa.gov...

not impossible but difficult

imagine a faint dwarf star still far away..

no im not wrong here sry to burst your bubble


But if it were "far away", that would imply that it is still OUTSIDE the Earth's orbit - otherwise, it would have to be < 1 AU away. If it's outside the Earth's orbit, it will be visible at night during some part of the year. Even as far in as Mercury (0.38 AU or so from the sun) it would still be visible at dusk or dawn during some part of the year.

edit on 2011/3/29 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by pazcat
reply to post by spikey
 


You don't even need any filters for daytime viewing, filters can be used but it is more useful for the astrophotography side of things. The Moon for example shows incredible detail considering the light and it is not to washed out at all. The same for Venus and other stars, you just need to know where to point your telescope and it is as simple as that.
You should be able to view stars as well that are to the 3rd/4th magnitude or brighter.

Oh and before heineken starts rabbiting on about his 'special setup' again here is some info about the Hartmann mask in his picture and how to make one.
edit on 29-3-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)


dont tell me that like that you can spot something like Nibiru cause i piss in my pants laughing...please



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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Originally posted by spikey
reply to post by heineken
 


I know what you're saying, and i'm no expert so take this with a pinch of salt, but you can observe during the early morning and during the day.

Most objects won't be visible of course, as their light is too faint and is swamped and lost in our suns light and the ideal conditions for viewing is at night, and as dark as possible, so the light from distant objects is not obscured and is as clear as possible.

Sometimes though, Venus will be visible very bright around dawn, and can be seen through a scope.

Sometimes too, you'll see our moon bright and lit in the daytime sky, and you can view that too during the day.

Ideally a filter of some type will be used, as the image will be bright a bit washed out, but you can still see celestial objects during the daytime hours, *provided* they are bright enough.

If the 'mystery' object is right next to the sun, unless it is very bright, i doubt it would be seen unless by something as sophisticated as SOHO. Someone with an amateur scope would probably not see as it would be swamped with sunlight, even if you covered the suns disk and used a filter, i would be surprised if it could be seen.

But i've only used my scope a handful of times, so i'm really not even close to knowing for sure.




thanks for your post..i can at least confirm there are who understood my intentions..thanks


i still dont think that amateur astronomers can locate an unknown far faint object during daytime



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by GodIsPissed
Well explain this!!


2 suns,Ufos,some kind of blue beam radiating from the sun...this video has it all!


I have explanation: LENS FLARE, and if Nibiru is so called "brown dwarf" it cannot be photographed with mobile phone crappy camera.

Stop posting these lens flares, they are all over Internet -.-



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by heineken

so your source is one person here who saw it till noon...

and my source was from :

Sources
"British Astronomical Association Observing Guide" (BAA, Piccadilly, London, 1995).
"Norton's 2000.0" edited by Ian Ridpath (Longman Group UK Ltd., Harlow, 1989).
"Celestron 8 Instruction Manual" (Celestron International, Torrance, CA, 1994).

dude..get a job


That "one person" has a university education in Astronomy and Physics, University of North Carolina, 1993. My concentration was on mapping local stars. For that I had to be very familiar with distances, angles (to include spherical trigonometry) and the properties of stars and stellar bodies (from red and brown dwarves, all the way up to class O1a). I also studied the relative concentrations of the various classes of stars in the local neighborhood so that I could construct theoretical models of the distribution of them in space. I had to know about how all those different sorts of stars radiate in different parts of the spectrum, because that's how they are classified, and it had a direct bearing on taking a census of the stellar population.

I may be an amateur, but I'm not a novice, and I'm telling you flat out that there is no such body as "Nibiru" in the places it is claimed for it to be. It's possible for one to be on the far outer edge of the solar system, and be yet undetected, but every day that goes by decreases that likelihood. We have found brown dwarves in the Orion Nebula. If we can find them that far away, it's vanishingly unlikely (although not impossible at this point) for one to be hiding from us right in our own solar system. Even then, it would have to be FAR away in the outer reaches, and could pose absolutely NO credible danger to us of itself at all. The only potential possibility of any sort of problem from it would be if it were to dislodge a comet from the Oort cloud, and fling it inward toward the inner solar system.

A brown dwarf < 4.6 billion years old (the age of the solar system) would still be radiating heat, and most likely still be generating heat from gravitational pressures within itself. If it radiates heat, it can and would have been found in the infrared.





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