12 years old boy with higher IQ than Einstein developing his own theory of relativity

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posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by CasiusIgnoranze
This kid makes me look like a retard



I think you do that well on your own


Just joking , Great Find O.P , S& F , The most dangerous kid in the world , but for who? .......Maybe hes normal and we are the Retards like another poster said , Very Neat Thread




posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:15 AM
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Right now he is out to prove the big bang theory is wrong. He explains this in a very simple way. ( near the end of the article)

Genius at work:

I don't think he will burn out like some have said. Jake clearly has a passion for what he does, and it shows. You can tell by watching his You-Tube Videos. I wonder if he is planning on working on a cold fusion formula in the near future? That would be interesting to watch. Jake truly thinks on a different plain.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by SJE98
 


For hundreds and thousands of years it seems like we have been searching for the right questions ,
In 2011 , we have alot of Grand Questions , And these Talented Kids will naturally want to answer them , Exciting Times Indeed ,,,



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:24 AM
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The thing that amazes and intrigues me the most is...he's seemingly...modest? I don't have enough insight on him to say that its true, but its pretty cool. Some of the people I've encounteedr in College so far, who are really smart and gifted, are pretty rude.

We all see it though, this kid is set to fly to great distances, so great that many of us won't achieve. I hope he sets his dreams and then smashes them with great success.
edit on 25-3-2011 by abaraikenshi because: Grammar



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:33 AM
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wow some people just need to chill on this kid, sure he seems to be good at math, but he is still a kid. Besides unless he finds ways to solve some of the real problems of this world. Like a way to end world hunger, or a governing system that works, or the whole new paradigm of living, since this pyramid system we live under, has a habit of going to the extremes of slavery and stifling everything, or just collapsing every couple of generations, or every thousand years or so.

Then to tell the truth, to me he is just a kid who is good at math, which is cool and all, but still some people here seem to think he is some sort of superman because of that, if anything, I have found these people who have aspergers or whatever else to excel in some things, but totally bust in others, so in that respect they are just people with different skills and attributes, then what is considered the norm. If i was his parents I would encourage his attributes and what works for him, but I wouldn't give him a big head about it, because the world and existence is a lot more then just numbers and theories on a chalkboard. Not dissing the kid or what he is doing, just you know, he is still just a kid.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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Has everybody forgotten that math and science aren't the only subjects taught in school?

Which doesn't mean you can just skip to college like that...



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


To be brutally honest I am always skeptical about stories like this. Not to take anything away from this kid, he is obviously going to be successful and definitely shows a capacity for learning that most his age don't. However, how much of this is his parents shoving "learning" (ie: memorization) of advanced topics down his throat?
I know a guy from my hometown who was "self-taught" by his parents before he entered elementary school. They taught him how to read and do math, but it was mostly for their gain: to tell all their friend's they produced a prodigy.
The guy is now a lawyer and is definitely doing well, but still, no "Einstein". Asperger's syndrome, if it is actually real, deals with social awkwardness and a lack of understanding social boundaries/norms. I'm going to be the dick and say this has a lot more to do with the guy holding the camera, than the kid it's focusing on...

edit: integrals aren't difficult, and what he is "teaching" are the basic problems everyone learns. A good memorization would allow you to "learn" these problems at a young age, and the way he presents them, it seems like he is doing just that. Again, not taking anything away from him, I doubt most kids would have the patience to even look at a textbook when they are 12
edit on 25-3-2011 by makinho21 because: forgot to add



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:55 AM
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I stopped watching at 5 minutes. That kid might as well have been speaking Latin.

No speaka de englais.....

Non comprenda....

Say whaaaat????

I wish him well though.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by StaceyWilson
 




Originally posted by StaceyWilson

Originally posted by CasiusIgnoranze This kid makes me look like a retard
I think you do that well on your own
Just joking , Great Find O.P , S& F , The most dangerous kid in the world , but for who? .......Maybe hes normal and we are the Retards like another poster said , Very Neat Thread



Aspergers sufferers have high concentration levels but are predominently a danger to themselves as the pre occupation of their illness makes them not eat or normally function,it is a huge undertaking for a education body to take on a aspergers child and promote as a prodigy.The development of the child can on conclusion of compulsive behaviours lead to a dangerous precedence for mental and health of this young individual,and great care is required,he is human not a computer.
If he is treated as a robot he will shutdown and freeze,and that will be the end to all the hallaballoo,get to know before ya show ignorance of these rare, special ,individuals.We are not retards ,he is not a retard ,just special and different.
Peace gringo.
edit on 25-3-2011 by gringoboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:01 AM
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Originally posted by makinho21
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


To be brutally honest I am always skeptical about stories like this. Not to take anything away from this kid, he is obviously going to be successful and definitely shows a capacity for learning that most his age don't. However, how much of this is his parents shoving "learning" (ie: memorization) of advanced topics down his throat?
I know a guy from my hometown who was "self-taught" by his parents before he entered elementary school. They taught him how to read and do math, but it was mostly for their gain: to tell all their friend's they produced a prodigy.
The guy is now a lawyer and is definitely doing well, but still, no "Einstein". Asperger's syndrome, if it is actually real, deals with social awkwardness and a lack of understanding social boundaries/norms. I'm going to be the dick and say this has a lot more to do with the guy holding the camera, than the kid it's focusing on...

edit: integrals aren't difficult, and what he is "teaching" are the basic problems everyone learns. A good memorization would allow you to "learn" these problems at a young age, and the way he presents them, it seems like he is doing just that. Again, not taking anything away from him, I doubt most kids would have the patience to even look at a textbook when they are 12
edit on 25-3-2011 by makinho21 because: forgot to add


Yes you are completely right, it would have been a lot more impressive if he had done some differential equations for us.

Not to mention if he new the subject well enough he should have been able to give a much more detailed lecture.

I'm not saying he's stupid, I'm just saying he's not all that he's cracked up to be.

P.S. I taught myself Algebra 1, and 2, Trigonometry, Geometry, then Single and Multi-variable calculus at the age of 13 back in my day.(Yes it was during summer)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:05 AM
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reply to post by mbkennel
 




No. The actually mysterious part of quantum mechanics is that it works in a Hilbert space. I personally think that all other apparent randomness is not essential but ordinary determinstic chaos, and that in the right space, the unlimited and perpetual time evolution of the Heisenberg equation is true, and not just in moments between magical 'observations' but always.


Isnt that something like the de Broglie–Bohm interpretation of QM? I am not a physicist, but it makes far more intuitive sense to me to sacrifice locality (especially if it cannot be used t send information faster than light in our reality) than sacrificing determinism (causality).



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:12 AM
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Jake was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, a mild form of autism, from an early age.




This reminded me of good will hunting. The movie was about a young math genius with autism who struggled with his emotions.

great movie. Maybe there is a connection with geniuses and autism.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:15 AM
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reply to post by binomialtheorem
 


exactly, it all comes down to passion and interest. If you can seed an interest of math in your child, there is no reason calculus can't be "learned". Math isn't necessarily hard, but the culture surrounding it forces weaker students to be scared of their abilities, and thus, they rarely improve. As I said before though, I still consider there to be a huge distinction between memorizing something and actually learning it. I honestly admit I doubt I've learned much at university, but I definitely memorized a #-tonne. The way he presented the integral problems just made me suspect it's more of the latter form of understanding which is being shown to us.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:20 AM
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Originally posted by RisenAngel77

Jake was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, a mild form of autism, from an early age.




This reminded me of good will hunting. The movie was about a young math genius with autism who struggled with his emotions.

great movie. Maybe there is a connection with geniuses and autism.


...Matt Damon never was autistic in that movie. He was just a smart ass non-educated bostonian. Also, Asperger's is a grey-area diagnosis: alot of asperger's patients use the title as almost a badge of supremacy, alluding to the fact they might be advanced in "intelligence" than a normal human, yet doctors don't really classify asperger's as autism. It's a basically just a description of a tendency to be socially inept.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:46 AM
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Originally posted by scottlpool2003
Sensational, it's people like this who should be on footballers wages. The people who can really make a difference.


THAT is one of the best things I have read on ATS.

I 100% agree.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 03:47 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 
I'm sure he's been on many people's 'watch list" for some time. Hopefully, he'll be able to get through all the b.s. hes going to have to put up with.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:13 AM
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Originally posted by mbkennel


This is not a correct description of either Bohr or Einstein.

Neither of them disagreed on the experimental predictions of quantum mechanics---after all Einstein invented/discovered the idea of the photon and the quantitative theory of the laser. Einstein asserted that Bohr's "Copenhagen Interpretation" was physically unclear conceptual mumbo-jumbo even though it produced correct answers.

Many modern scientists who study this agree (as I do as well) . Einstein proposed some alterations to QM to alleviate these issues. Only after Einstein had died, were these specific proposals ruled out by experiment. However, the nonsensical nature of Copenhagen-Interpretation as a fundamental concept remained.

Today "decoherence" (supported by modern understanding of chaos) is the best explanation for the QM observability problems and Einstein would have supported this as physically reasonable instead of "Copenhagen".

On this, I think Einstein was more right than Bohr, though Bohr was right that his + Heisenberg's mechanics were really enough to explain observations.


As Bohr proved, there is a chaotic random nature to the fabric of reality and what we understand of advanced physics now is essentially obsolete.


No. The actually mysterious part of quantum mechanics is that it works in a Hilbert space.
I personally think that all other apparent randomness is not essential but ordinary determinstic chaos, and that in the right space, the unlimited and perpetual time evolution of the Heisenberg equation is true, and not just in moments between magical 'observations' but always.
edit on 25-3-2011 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-3-2011 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)


I stand corrected, it sounds like you know your stuff. I just based my comments on a Nova special on Einstein's life and some brief wikipedia research. I remember reading that Bohr's theories do not adequately explain the properties of "larger atoms". I know there is a great deal we don't know about quantum mechanics because we're talking about particles that are smaller than atoms. I do know that there was an experiment that was carried out in Einstein's life time in which Bohr was vindicated. They were both geniuses in their own right and I do know that Einstein was troubled by some of Bohr's discoveries.
edit on 25-3-2011 by slopeofyourmind because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:20 AM
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Stupid 'A' Students! He's smart but he won't have sex until he's 30 or 40 when he has finally made his money and can buy chicks.....you know, like all the other nerds from school.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:22 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by Jerry_Teps
 


Science is dogma now, especially astronomy.


No, it is not.


dog·ma (dôgm, dg-)
n. pl. dog·mas or dog·ma·ta (-m-t)
1. A doctrine or a corpus of doctrines relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth in an authoritative manner by a church.
2. An authoritative principle, belief, or statement of ideas or opinion, especially one considered to be absolutely true. See Synonyms at doctrine.


Relativity has and always is changing, science is not dogmatic, in fact, it's the complete opposite, like I said, we've developed his theory considerably since it's inception, just like evolution is no longer Darwin's theory, Relativity is no longer Einsteins.


Yet science worships his theory as a religion


They worship the theory? Oh right, just like biologists worship cell division.

"Praise be to the great Lorentz Transforms!"

I suggest, like with the other poster, you educate yourself before attacking things when you have no clue what they are.
edit on 25-3-2011 by Jerry_Teps because: spelling



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:38 AM
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Originally posted by galadofwarthethird

Then to tell the truth, to me he is just a kid who is good at math, which is cool and all, but still some people here seem to think he is some sort of superman because of that, if anything,.


I don't know about that , Einstein was also supposedly good at math and people seem to think he was also a super man and tend to worship his theories for some reason . I guess it might be connected





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