It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Coldest Star Found—No Hotter Than Fresh Coffee- STARS WITH WATER!!

page: 2
19
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 01:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by Arken

A Brown Dwarf with an atmosphere and water vapor clouds?


LIFE?

edit on 24-3-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)


I see you found that interesting as well. You are welcome. And life on it would be amazing..
Thanks




posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 01:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


The star with the most gravity, mass, not necessarily size, wins the fuel battle in a binary system, of at least one spent star, or a star of insufficient mass to conduct fusion.


Thank you for the data



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:17 PM
link   
Peculiar that my oven can reach higher temperatures.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 04:04 PM
link   
reply to post by Jepic
 


Right!!! Atleast you know know that Earth isnt the only place that can potentially produce living environments. I wish I could see the soil/ground/glass type surface from all the heat/magnetisim/radiation it sounds so Venus minus the acid showers.

Thanks



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 04:16 PM
link   
This is pretty amazing. It's hard to believe something like this is even possible. I'd love to see what it really looks like.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 04:24 PM
link   
Well it seems that there needs to be better understanding of Stars and how they work. I find it amazing that this Star wouldnt reset my fire but whos is to say how its magnetisim effects gravity. It is still pretty cool tho. Thank you all for the inputs in the thread and any others feel free to add more. I will check back later.

Be well



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 06:21 PM
link   
If that's a Binary Star System which the companion star has the ability to hold water with atmosphere and is considered a Brown Dwarf...I hate to say it but doesnt that give a lil more credability to our own solar system being a Binary Star System? That might possibly explain where earth got some of it's water from..Our companion star might resemble this Brown Dwarf and when it comes through on close approach maybe the earth leached some water from it...Maybe our Binary companion (if there is one) isn't as big as the one we see now so our Gravity could do so..just a far reaching thought



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 08:33 AM
link   
reply to post by Noromyxo
 

reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 

Brown dwarfs may create heat through deuterium fusion (as opposed to hydrogen fusion) if they are more than 13 times as massive as Jupiter:

en.wikipedia.org...

brown dwarfs heavier than 13 MJ do fuse deuterium and those above ~65 MJ also fuse lithium.

Ophiuchus 13 was on the right track about a possible heat source being the binary star.

If the binary brown dwarfs aren't tidally locked (I don't know if these are or not) the tidal forces can generate considerable heat and friction internally. The tidal forces on Jupiter's moon Io are so strong, significant heat is generated:

Io (moon)

...Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System. This extreme geologic activity is the result of tidal heating from friction generated within Io's interior as it is pulled between Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites...

It's a bit of a misnomer to call it a star, which usually refers to an object with at least hydrogen-1 fusion.

A brown dwarf is a sub-stellar object:


Brown dwarfs are sub-stellar objects which are too low in mass to sustain hydrogen-1 fusion reactions in their cores, which is characteristic of stars on the main sequence.

edit on 25-3-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 08:37 AM
link   
Sorry I haven't read the whole thread but am I right in saying that stars are no more than huge planets that have collected so much mass and internal gravity that they suffer from nuclear chain reaction starting within their core until the once planet becomes a nuclear powered furnace.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:03 AM
link   
So we have a sun with a atmosphere and water. As this doesn't have nuclear fusion is it still able to produce UV light?

If it does could this have life? basically you have a earth with no need for a sun floating through space..... thats prety cool



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:37 AM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur
It's a bit of a misnomer to call it a star, which usually refers to an object with at least hydrogen-1 fusion.

Some would even say it's a misnomer to call it a brown dwarf unless its true mass is above that 13 MJ cutoff. It probably did form the way a star would, rather than accreting out of a circumstellar disk, but some would say that 13 MJ is the minimum mass for a brown dwarf and anything below is something else regardless of how it formed. Likewise, 13 MJ is considered to be the maximum mass for an extrasolar planet and anything above that is a brown dwarf.
arxiv.org...
iopscience.iop.org...
It's also interesting to note that brown dwarfs are more commonly single objects than part of binary systems, and are rarely ever found in wide orbits, and it's rarer still to find them as binaries with sun-like stars.




top topics



 
19
<< 1   >>

log in

join