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When Cell Towers Cease Functioning

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posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by Analyze76
 

Well, the way that post read, you were talking about CB and licensing in the same sentence. So, it appeared you were talking about CB. Apologies for the misread.


edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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Tech Tip:

A widebanded CB radio, when done properly by a trained technician, will cover the following frequency range (depending on model of CB):

26.5050 Mhz - 27.9950 Mhz

Some models will go as low as 26.0050 Mhz And as high as 28.0050 Mhz.

Most widebanded CB's almost always have SSB (Single Side Band) along with AM.

Export Radios can be widebanded further, but are illegal to sell/buy within the US.

Also, to note, widebanding ANY radio is a violation of FCC Rules and Regulations and can result in imprisonment and/or substantial fines and FCC taking possession of all equipment.
edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by MadDogtheHunter
However, most HAM radios require a tower system for long ranges. So, the only real option left for reliable long range communications in a world where cell phones and tower systems cease to exist, is the CB radio.


I have to debate this somewhat.
There are many parts of the RF spectrum allotted to the ham bands. This means that when skip (desirable atmospheric conditions for long range communications) isn't happening in the singular and narrow CB band it may be working in one or more of the many Ham bands allowing international communication on even a hand held unit. Also ham radios are generally designed with more sensitive, more stable and more discriminating receivers than CBs which helps markedly with long range communications as well.

An added bonus to having a ham unit is that you have access to reception of all of the emergency services frequencies, radio and television audio frequencies, aircraft transmissions, international shortwave news stations, etc. This really boosts situational awareness.

I carry a Yaesu VX-8DR. It fits in the palm of my hand, is waterproof and the antenna unscrews and breaks down so basically it just sits in my coat pocket and I can forget about it until sit-x happens. I do a lot of hiking in areas without cell service but I know that if I ever need to call for help I will be able to pull the ham unit out of my pocket and talk to somebody. I also carry a tiny spool of hair thin wire and an adapter that allows me to bind the wires to the antenna connector. This allows me to string out a large antenna for long range communication on the LF bands which propagate easily around the world.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by MadDogtheHunter

Originally posted by gaia.chi.au
just for those folks who aren't to clear on these things, you cannot use a UHF 'cb' radio as these require what are called 'repeater stations' to help carry the signal great distances :-)

it needs to be an "AM" cb or an "AM / SSB" cb radio

Unless you happen to have and older RCI (Ranger) 2950 or 2970 that has FM capability too.

They don't make CB Radios that are UHF, they never have and never will. CB has operated on the 27Mhz band since the 1950's.


omg get a life and stop nit picking... if they average Jo Blow walks into a shop and ask for a uhf cb they are gonna walk out with one... far out!



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by gaia.chi.au
 

Nope, sorry, no such thing as a UHF CB Radio, at least not in the US. CB is and always has been, Low frequency. 27 Mhz is not UHF. Anyone walks in to a CB shop in the States and asks for a UHF CB, they're going to get one heck of a puzzled look and a laugh from the guy behind the counter.

And I have a life thank you. Nice set of manners you have there.
edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 

That may be, but, the average person can get and use a CB much cheaper and quicker. Thats my whole point about this. A radio like you speak of is well above $300. Where for $100 or less, a complete CB can be set up. And no tests to study for, or no license either.

You mention using the HAM radios in simplex when skip is just right. Thats the thing, IF its just right. Meanwhile, skip isn't needed for a CB to reach well over 30 miles away, on any given day (location dependent). Skip has been known to "go away" on any given radio band, for sometimes weeks at a time.

edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by MadDogtheHunter
reply to post by gaia.chi.au
 

Nope, sorry, no such thing as a UHF CB Radio, at least not in the US. CB is and always has been, Low frequency.


I think some of the confusion here is because there is a growing trend toward the general use of the name "CB" for the FRS/GMRS radios.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


If thats the case, then thats the fault of whoever started that false classification, whether it be the companies or the general public.

For General Clarification:

CB means Citizens Band. Which has always been classified by the FCC as a radio that transmits and receives on the Class D (27 Mhz) Band. No other 2 way radio is classified by the FCC as a Citizens Band radio, other than the 40 channel radios you can buy at CB shops, Walmart, Radio Shack and so on.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by MadDogtheHunter
reply to post by dainoyfb
 

That may be, but, the average person can get and use a CB much cheaper and quicker. That's my whole point about this. A radio like you speak of is well above $300. Where for $100 or less, a complete CB can be set up. And no tests to study for, or no license either.

Depending on what you expect out of a rig, price is always a factor. You can pick up amazing ham equipment for pennies on the dollar at ham swaps in most major cities. The VX-8DR is arguably the best hand held on the market so for a around $400 that's not to bad. There are many much cheaper units that cover all these basic functions too.

I didn't have to show my ham license when I bought my VX-8DR. It depends where you shop. This is relevant since we are discussing circumventing FCC regulations to accomplish long range CB communications anyway.

At any rate anybody that is serious about having the the best radio gear for a survival situation (which is what this thread is about) is going to have to realize that they are not going to be able to conveniently go down to walmart, by a CB for 100 dollar and expect it to be the best thing going. Convenience has nothing to do with it. So I don't really follow your "can get and use a CB much cheaper and quicker" comment (except that I realize that our society indoctrinates us into that "get it quicker and easier" mentality so that we can get back to our PlayStations and Justin Bieber entertainment). Those serious about actually having the proper gear are going to realize that it isn't going to happen without a bit of leg work. This will probably involve finding out where proper gear is available in their area, checking out a few ham suppliers and Ham swaps, doing some research into cost verses function etc.



You mention using the HAM radios in simplex when skip is just right. That's the thing, IF its just right. Meanwhile, skip isn't needed for a CB to reach well over 30 miles away, on any given day (location dependent). Skip has been known to "go away" on any given radio band, for sometimes weeks at a time.


There are Ham radio bands that operate non-skip just as far a CB and further. What makes you think otherwise? And again since you are talking about modifying CBs, on some Ham Bands you can push upwards of 2000 watts legally. That's in comparison to 4 or 5 watts (depending on country) for CB. I should also mention here that many Ham units can be modified to transmit on the CB channels (I don't no why you'd want to) so really you'll have that covered anyway.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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I know nothing about this subject but what about a CB base station running a 100 watt linear amp ? Don't know if it will work but i wouldn't care if it was legal or not if the SHTF . I've heard of it being done but that's the sum total of my radio knowledge . I heard of two CB base stations running amps talking clearly at 100 miles , but it's a rumor .



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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Or get some polished materials, light some fires and start reflecting off the clouds like Batman. Coded light signals.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by bandito
I know nothing about this subject but what about a CB base station running a 100 watt linear amp ? Don't know if it will work but i wouldn't care if it was legal or not if the SHTF . I've heard of it being done but that's the sum total of my radio knowledge . I heard of two CB base stations running amps talking clearly at 100 miles , but it's a rumor .

In the past, I had a 500 watt base linear. Yes, its very possible, as long as you have 120VAC to run the linear. It wouldn't even kick on with 12VDC. And if it did, that battery would pop the second you transmitted with it.
edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by MadDogtheHunter
 


Presuming 80% efficiency 500 watts at 12 volts is 52 amps (37 amps if we are talking peak watts), well within the load capacity of a car battery. Lets spread facts here, not what we think we know.

Is a professionally modified CB + 500 watt amp going to cost $100 or less at Walmart, or do I have to do some leg work there?

Its odd that you are arguing CB over Ham equipment but all of these Linear amplifiers you are talking about are actually made for Ham equipment (because that is all they are legal to use with). They are not cheap, they are not readily available for the average person at Walmart, and they follow the same licensing regulations as all other Ham equipment.




edit on 24-3-2011 by dainoyfb because: it needed clarity.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 

I'm not even recommending a Linear amp, I was just replying to a question asked previously. Please don't assume I am recommending such an over-the-top set up.

And besides, the linear I had, was 120VAC Only anyway. No way to connect it to 12VDC without tearing it apart and modifying it. Also, don't assume "what I know". You haven't the foggiest clue "what I know" when it comes to this subject. Good Day Sir.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by MadDogtheHunter
 


Actually I've gained a pretty good idea of what you know. If a 500 watt amp will "pop" a battery then how do all of these cars running 1000 watt plus sound systems happen?



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Apparently, you're too literal of a person, and have no clue what a "figure of speech" is. Do not claim to know what I know. You don't know me, therefore, you cannot prove what you claim. As I said previously...Good Day Sir. Future replies from you will be ignored.

Linear amps for communications purposes, draw much higher amps than stereo amplifiers in vehicles. When all other knowledge sources fail, Google is your friend.
edit on 3/24/2011 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Yes I'm being literal. People here are asking for factual technical information. This is a technical subject and only facts will achieve the awareness and end result that the subscribers to this thread are looking for. Pawning off false information as "figure of speech" will not accomplish anything but disappointing results/ignorance. But its your thread. Have at it.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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This is more like what you'll want www.icomamerica.com... (click on 'handheld')
edit on 24-3-2011 by TomServo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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if the shtf,who would worry about if you had a licence or not??.....set up a ham rig ,but dont use it until the shtf.......seems about right to me...
peace,,,



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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I won't miss a beat if cell towers go dead. I have a pay as you go phone and don't even use 100 minutes a month. I'm old enough to remember when we all survived without cell phones. I hate answering the phone, and can't understand how my wife and kids can constantly talk or text all day on those things. I only use mine when my wife or kids call me, and that is seldom because they know I hardly ever carry my phone on me.




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