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New 'missing link' dinosaur discovered in Argentina

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posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 08:59 PM
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Fossils of a recently discovered dinosaur species in Argentina is a "missing link" in the evolution of the long-necked giants that roamed the earth millions of years ago, paleontologists said.

Paleontologists see the recently discovered Leonerasaurus Taquetransis as the connection between the smaller prosauropods -- also known as near-sauropods -- like Sellosaurus and Plateosaurus from the Triassic period (248-205 million years ago) to their much larger descendants, the sauropods.

Leonerasaurus lived some 10 million years before the sauropods and measured a mere three meters (yards) long
"The importance of this find is that it is a new species. It gives us information on the origin of the sauropods,"

www.physorg.com...

Pretty interesting, click the link to see the image

that's 10 million years before the Sauropods,that's quite alot
Now you think of evolution, look at his bone structure, seems capable of much more agility, speed and flexibility than so many other dinosaurs i've seen so many millions of years after this one.

WOW




posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


That's awesome!! I am glad they never stopped looking for dinosaur fossils! I was worried they would give it up like they have done other ventures. Well i guess give up is a bad way of putting it. Put less resources into it. Nice find by the way =0) S&F for you.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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I just love when they find new species like this, just boggles the mind the dreatures that used to roam this planet.



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 09:24 AM
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Oooh! I'll have to take this one to my paleontologists! I'm fairly sure they know about it, but I want to hear what else they've got to say on it.


Originally posted by ModernAcademia
Pretty interesting, click the link to see the image

that's 10 million years before the Sauropods,that's quite alot
Now you think of evolution, look at his bone structure, seems capable of much more agility, speed and flexibility than so many other dinosaurs i've seen so many millions of years after this one.


Actually, it's on par with most other dinosaurs -- and if anything, the limb bones are interestingly wide. But the vertebra of the neck is absolutly classic sauropod type shape (very distinctive and reflects in their descendants, the modern birds.) Love the shape of the head, too! I would have called it a classic sauropod as I wandered past.

If you love to geek out on dinosaurs, the "Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week" is the place to hang out. Or one of them.
svpow.wordpress.com...



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by Phantom28804
reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


That's awesome!! I am glad they never stopped looking for dinosaur fossils! I was worried they would give it up like they have done other ventures. Well i guess give up is a bad way of putting it. Put less resources into it. Nice find by the way =0) S&F for you.


The amount of material that's out there and is uncollected is staggering. A friend and I are talking about going on a collecting trip to the Big Bend in Texas where he has seen several T. Rex bones and where there are several sauropod bones. They're on private ranch lands, so getting permission is crucial.

And Tony keeps coming back from his summer expeditions to Alaska with several tons (yes, tons) of bones each year. We preparators can't keep up!



posted on Mar, 24 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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Hey cool! S&F.
All Hail the Argentinian Saurian!


I highly recommend a visit to Patagonia for all of you Dinosaur lovers, it's like a saurian zoo out here! You pick a rock and find a bone!
Nice post.



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 03:48 AM
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Back in the time of the dinosaurs, was Patagonia still part of South America, or was it part of Africa, or some kind of landmass of its own? If it was still linked to one of the other continents then it would be easy to see how it could share a common ancestry with species elsewhere, since the ancestor population would still be inhabiting the same patch of land, before it broke up.



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by superwurzel666
Back in the time of the dinosaurs, was Patagonia still part of South America, or was it part of Africa, or some kind of landmass of its own? If it was still linked to one of the other continents then it would be easy to see how it could share a common ancestry with species elsewhere, since the ancestor population would still be inhabiting the same patch of land, before it broke up.

According to the Continental Drift theory (that still has it's critics) and this map:

at some point S. America and Africa were pretty close, yes.
Drakus



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by drakus
 


Thanks for the map. I see that Africa and South America were pretty much joined in the Upper Jurassic. Oddly enough, China at this time seems almost the exact shape as modern day New Guinea.




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