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Linear Features

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posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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For over two years now, I have been mapping artificial linear features across the globe. These geoglyphs appear everywhere and I have mapped thousands of them. I have reached a point where I might like to share information with folks who are doing the same thing, assuming anyone actually is.

Just so that we are on the same page, I am speaking of Nazca-type lines. These lines can be anywhere. I have observed them starting in the ocean, turning into a pier, becoming a road, traveling for 40 miles, then spending another 20 miles variously as a ditch, property line, phone lines, and finally a road and back under water again. I have seen them end on one side of a lake and pick up on the other, etc., etc. The lines are all over the Americas, but I have recorded them on every other continent save Antarctica. If anyone has anything they would like to share, I would be greatful. Additionally, If I have a colleague out there who is interested in sharing information, I am very interested in that as well.
edit on 22-3-2011 by woghd because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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I just read this thread earlier, you might want to share info with this member??

www.abovetopsecret.com...

thread started by OrionHunterX
edit on 22-3-2011 by Tasty Canadian because: GRRRRR



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by woghd
 


examples?



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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Originally posted by ignorant_ape
reply to post by woghd
 


examples?


This site has some examples of the sort of things I have been mapping.
www.googleearthanomalies.com...



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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There's a lot of things on the Google Earth Anomalies that are "things people are unfamiliar with" -- for example, there's a very nice picture of a tidal bore labeled as a "line."
en.wikipedia.org...

They're quite common. I am skeptical of the "fish weir" identification, personally -- it seems to be in the wrong place and facing the wrong direction.

A few of the images are very old earthquake fault zones. One of the UK samples appears to be a dredge zone.

If you find an "anomaly", the first thing to do is look at maps -- modern maps as well as older maps of the area. Geological maps of the areas will tell you if you've got an escarpment or fault lines (often described as "anomalies.") Knowing where the edges of the stone beds are will also show you if an "anomaly" is just a ridge of harder stone where grass and trees don't grow well.

Volcanic dikes are also commonly identified as "anomalies." These are cracks in the earth filled by lava from ancient volcanoes.
en.wikipedia.org...(geology)

In the case of Yucutan, a bit of research on old roads will help. Some of the features can be walls and fencelines.

It's fun to look for oddities in maps.

You might check in with the Google Earth forums and ask people who live near those areas to comment on them. You can find some surprising stuff!



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
There's a lot of things on the Google Earth Anomalies that are "things people are unfamiliar with" -- for example, there's a very nice picture of a tidal bore labeled as a "line."
en.wikipedia.org...

They're quite common. I am skeptical of the "fish weir" identification, personally -- it seems to be in the wrong place and facing the wrong direction.

A few of the images are very old earthquake fault zones. One of the UK samples appears to be a dredge zone.

If you find an "anomaly", the first thing to do is look at maps -- modern maps as well as older maps of the area. Geological maps of the areas will tell you if you've got an escarpment or fault lines (often described as "anomalies.") Knowing where the edges of the stone beds are will also show you if an "anomaly" is just a ridge of harder stone where grass and trees don't grow well.

Volcanic dikes are also commonly identified as "anomalies." These are cracks in the earth filled by lava from ancient volcanoes.
en.wikipedia.org...(geology)

In the case of Yucutan, a bit of research on old roads will help. Some of the features can be walls and fencelines.

It's fun to look for oddities in maps.

You might check in with the Google Earth forums and ask people who live near those areas to comment on them. You can find some surprising stuff!


Thank you. I was going to make some of these same points, but I'm afraid that I was having trouble articulating them. In addition to Tidal lines, fault lines, and volcanic dikes, I have caught myself mapping photo edges, bad overlays, and my own Pareidolia. The work isn't easy.

I started this as an aside to my ley line research, and I was quick to find that many places all over the world have what seem to be ancient line patterns carved into rock and whatnot. As I said before the more interesting ones are perfectly straight and travel through many mediums, ie., ocean-pier-road-fenceline-temple-road-canal-ocean, (or similar) Additionally, sometimes I do not find lines where I expect to find them which is even more Baffling sometimes.

Anywho, I would Love to trade kmz files with anyone who might be doing similar work.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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I fear that I may be the only person actively researching these things.



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


I agree with you about dredge zones. My home town isn't very far from the Severn Estuary. On the ground it looks like an arm of the sea, but from satellite pics it always looks like a big expanse of mud, even though you wouldn't see that if you were looking out from the shore. A problem with satellite pics is that they often tend to make things more noticeable if they run in straight lines. Thus if you look at Bristol, you can see the M5 motorway very well, yet you see no indication of Dundry Hill, even though its over 2 miles long, 700 feet high and can be seen from miles away.

The resolution from certain altitudes may also cause distortions, causing straight lines to appear where there aren't any.



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Absolutely correct.

I have a question. Does anyone know if there is an agency which records the discoveries of geoglyphs? I have come across more than a dew I gave never heard of, and could not find on the web anywhere. Anyone know?



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