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US warplane found crashed in field (Libya)

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posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by NewEmpire816

Originally posted by Virgil Cain
They mentioned that one of the pilots was picked up by a US plane that went in. You'd think that if they could get to the pilot, they could also get to the plane and do a little clean up, but judging from the pictures, it certainly doesn't look as if there has been an airstrike nor has anyone been around to clean up. I guess one has to assume that some civilians got there first and they elected against the airstrike. Still surprises me that they didn't get a team in there to clean up.


I'm sorry but if you were in a war active area dropping bombs and being shot at I doubt the first thing you want to do is clean up a wrecked plane,the area will be cleaned/rebuilt when all this is over


I meant "clean up" as in getting rid of any equipment that they might not want getting into the wrongs hands - an activity that certainly may be undertaken during active engagements if the tech is deemed important enough to keep away from others. It's often accomplished via an airstrike.

Through further inquiry, my understanding is that this particular aircraft probably does not contain any cutting edge technology and, as such, probably isn't worth the effort of the "clean up".




posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by Virgil Cain

Originally posted by NewEmpire816

Originally posted by Virgil Cain
They mentioned that one of the pilots was picked up by a US plane that went in. You'd think that if they could get to the pilot, they could also get to the plane and do a little clean up, but judging from the pictures, it certainly doesn't look as if there has been an airstrike nor has anyone been around to clean up. I guess one has to assume that some civilians got there first and they elected against the airstrike. Still surprises me that they didn't get a team in there to clean up.


I'm sorry but if you were in a war active area dropping bombs and being shot at I doubt the first thing you want to do is clean up a wrecked plane,the area will be cleaned/rebuilt when all this is over


I meant "clean up" as in getting rid of any equipment that they might not want getting into the wrongs hands - an activity that certainly may be undertaken during active engagements if the tech is deemed important enough to keep away from others. It's often accomplished via an airstrike.

Through further inquiry, my understanding is that this particular aircraft probably does not contain any cutting edge technology and, as such, probably isn't worth the effort of the "clean up".


Exactly. The only thing you could possibly worry about tech wise is a LANTIRN and the ECM Jamming equipment along with the other radar stuff, but this plane has been exported to many allies with the existing radar, not a dumbed down version, which tells you that any possible intel which could be gained is dated to say the least, the f-15e is a slightly enlarged ground attack version of the front line USAF air superiority fighter the f-15c which is currently being phased out of service. The C version of the aircraft is not even used by the Air Guard units which would be most likely to see action. the f-15 is considered a so called 4th gen fighter, where as the f-22 is 5th gen, and the eurofighter and french rafale that are seing front line service in the libya op are 4.5 gen.

Nice to see that someone has done their research and is not posting about alien super planes, good catch bro



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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It looks too nice and neat for a crash site. Like something out of an expensive movie set.



Or it might just be me.

edit on 22-3-2011 by Jepic because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by Jepic
 


Jettison your bombs, your fuel tanks, engine auto shutdown, you would have possibly a limited explosion... Look up some Air Forces monthly accident reports and you will be surprised what shows up in tact sometimes. Nobody saw a white plane flying low, you might actually have to believe this one.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by Now_Then
reply to post by USAisSatanic
 


The reporter that has seen the wreak says that it is fairly complete, the anti aircraft missiles capable of hitting that would pretty much destroy the aircraft - sounds to me a little like the pilot tried to control the F15 for as long as possible to probably ditch in the best available place, and then ejected at the very last minute - he seems to have done something right cos he was taken in by the rebels and is being protected etc... Now the biggest worry would be either hauling the wreak out or destroying it totally with air strikes.... loads of nice kit in one place there, lots of weapons lots of top secret stuff.

You'll be surprised at the maintenance and logistics nightmare that the airforce has to go through during combat. After all they're machines requiring maintenance. If not anything they're by far the most widely used planes in overseas combat along with the F16s. Moreoever most of the airframes are pretty old since the production stopped years ago for the F15. Do not be surprised if this piece of news is actually true.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by ethancoop
Simple fact is that these planes are 20 years old & have been pushed to their limit through countless missions in recent years. We've been wearing out our airframes in the middle east & have no money to buy new ones. Not only have these conflicts been draining our monetary resources but now we're seeing their impact on the men and materials we're supposed to have for defense.

I couldn't agree more on that.

Old frame, wear and tear. Definitely material fatigue and/or mechanical wear and tear on the internal components. Moreoever we do not know which base was servicing this plane.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 03:19 PM
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Seems to be confirmed.

Lots of pics at this link.

They welcomed the pilots and the US shot them.

Link

U.S. rescue chopper shoots six Libyan villagers as they welcome pilots of downed Air Force jet
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 7:28 PM on 22nd March 2011



Six Libyan villagers are recovering in hospital after being shot by American soldiers coming in to rescue the U.S. pilots whose plane crash-landed in a field.
The helicopter strafed the ground as it landed in a field outside Benghazi beside the downed U.S. Air Force F-15E Eagle which ran into trouble during bombing raid last night.
And a handful of locals who had come to greet the pilots were hit - among them a young boy who may have to have a leg amputated because of injuries caused by a bullet wound.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


almost makes you worry how far stretched we will be in 5 years when they are still tweaking the 35 and we are what, 200 planes short due to declining to refit and rebuild and have not ordered new in what, 15 years? Hell, I bet the UK is looking at their readiness now and wondering if they will activate a couple harrier squadrons after officially retiring them this year. what a cluster **** the jsf program has become, boyd is rolling in his grave



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by steppenwolf86
reply to post by hp1229
 


almost makes you worry how far stretched we will be in 5 years when they are still tweaking the 35 and we are what, 200 planes short due to declining to refit and rebuild and have not ordered new in what, 15 years? Hell, I bet the UK is looking at their readiness now and wondering if they will activate a couple harrier squadrons after officially retiring them this year. what a cluster **** the jsf program has become, boyd is rolling in his grave
Well its a numbers game as usual for the folks in DC if you ask me


UCAV and UAV are the future. Lets see how many of those will be approved



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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The plane, based at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, had set off from Aviano in Italy but came down at Bu Mariem, some 24 miles east of Benghazi. The jet's wreckage is set to be recovered or destroyed by the Americans, to prevent the plant coming into Gaddafi's hands Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...
Article
I just wanted to post this for those who had asked where the plane was based out of, and what the U.S. intended to do. It seems that the U.S. wants to do SOMETHING about the wreck, the question now is what.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 05:38 PM
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If anybody honestly believes a U.S. F-15 going on a real life war mission, has a mechanical failure and crashes... I dont kno what to tell you.
In the real world, it was shot down. Not really incredable news, this kind of thing is to be expected during a war. But its what happened.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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Somebody on this website must have a military friend in RAF Lakenheath. Ask them if the equipment maintance squadron has had a mass urine test today. No piss test = not a mechanical failure.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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List of F-15 losses

Here is a nearly complete list to my knowledge of F-15 losses. A total loss due to mechanical failure is very unlikely considering the twin engine design and the redundancies designed into the flight control and hydraulics systems.


The F-15 also has three separate and independent hydraulic systems which can isolate and detect leaks. Any one of these hydraulic systems can take over entirely if the other two systems are damaged.


source

Still, even with a cleverly designed system to increase survivability, a couple where lost due to ground fire during Desert Storm. If you are unfortunate enough to take damage to a hydraulic reservoir that resulted in a complete and rapid loss of fluid I can see what we got here. Also, if it was across multiple hydraulic systems a complete isolation wouldn't be possible and fluid levels would eventually run out.

The F-15 is a pretty survivable aircraft. Once it landed minus an entire wing! Got to have those systems still functioning or you wouldn't be able to operate the aircraft control surfaces.

So, I'm thinking it took damage to multiple hydraulic systems and eventually hydraulic pressure was lost resulting in the need to abandon the aircraft. It wasn't rapid but it was inevitable. It allowed time to get the aircraft pointed to a safe location and at an attitude and airspeed that allowed for safe ejection.

I'm calling BS on the official story of a mechanical failure. Unless they attribute the failure to perforation by ground fire.


Soul



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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www.smh.com.au...

But a US spokesman "100%" denied any civilians were injured by US weapons fire in the rescue operation.

Reporter Lindsey Hilsum, at the scene of the crash, said the US helicopter came in and opened fire on Monday night, local time, as villagers were handing over one of the downed pilots to local rebel forces.

A man described as a military policeman, Omar Sayd, told the reporter: "We are disturbed about the shooting because if they had given us a chance we would have handed over both pilots."


*sigh*



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by Soulwarrior


I'm calling BS on the official story of a mechanical failure. Unless they attribute the failure to perforation by ground fire.


Soul


I honestly don't know what happened one way or the other but enjoy exploring the hypotheticals. As others have pointed out, given the strain some of these aircraft are under, it seems within the realm of possibility that it might have been mechanical failure. That being said, you seem to bring up some very good points in regards to the record of the aircraft as well as its redundant systems.

If it was taken down by ground fire, don't you think the Libyans would take credit for the downing? And if so, why have they not (as far as I know) thus far?



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by Danbones
Saddam shot down seven tornados


What, personally?


Thats because, as stated before, they were doing low-level bombing runs on heavily guarded air fields etc. The sort of raids that attract alot of fire.


Originally posted by Danbones
they were withdrawn from service...


When? Some squadrons are being disbanded, but some remain. The GR4's are in action in Libya.


Originally posted by Danbones
I understand they are not very reliable.


From whom? Bloody sturdy aircraft and versatile too.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Libertygal
 


If you’re a brown person in a war zone in the middle east and you see US soldiers comin… get the hell out of there… to them you’re an insurgent, combatant, or a terrorist… they’ll shoot first and won’t ask questions later.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by Virgil Cain
 


Yes, I'm likewise just exploring the possibilities and you bring up a great point in that credit for a shoot down hasn't been claim. There isn't much information available in regards to exactly where the lines of forces are at the moment. I'd sorta interpreted the reports that the rebels had pushed at least a hundred miles to the west of Benghazi and that would put this site within their lines. If there really are "lines" to speak of in this conflict it's got to be a really blurry definition considering rebel forces.

The Times of Malta reports the location 25 miles southwest of Benghazi. Maybe the trouble for the crew started further to the west and this was an area already determined a good place to ditch.

Revisiting the fuel issue put forth earlier I'd said that I didn't think it was the culprit, but wide awake today I've got another scenario. Possibly the aircraft was attempting to take fuel from a tanker and had issues that didn't allow for a full load of fuel to get passed. This would put it out of range for a recovery back at a friendly field and dangerously short of gas to start with if it did have problems with a tanker. What's your take on that thought?

The fact that civilians came to harm in the crew recovery really upsets me. Seems like something that could have been relayed from the aircrew to the CSAR team enroute. Plus, I'd suspect other aircraft (possibly a UAV) had eyes on the site before they arrived.

Soul

edit on 22-3-2011 by Soulwarrior because: east/west correction







 
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