This Bread recipe could be the difference between starving/eating in the times ahead.

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posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 06:10 AM
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Going back to survival bread recipes here is mine:

3 cups self raising flour
about 1 cup of milk

knead well, a bread making machine can do it in 10 minutes, and then make it like flat pizza base. You can add some salt and a tiny bit of sugar if you want. You can also sub half a cup of another flour like maize, sorghum or millet.




posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 06:17 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 

That is taste bud sexy......thanks OP!



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by Cinrad
Going back to survival bread recipes here is mine:

3 cups self raising flour
about 1 cup of milk

knead well, a bread making machine can do it in 10 minutes, and then make it like flat pizza base. You can add some salt and a tiny bit of sugar if you want. You can also sub half a cup of another flour like maize, sorghum or millet.


Thanks!

Do you have any pics of the results?

Peace



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Not able to atm, it is very fine crumbed, and flat like a pizza base, I roll it out with an oiled rolling pin. I cut it into squares about the size of a slice of bread for my kids' sandwiches, one of them is alergic to yeast. If it is is a bit too thick, slice it down the middle, if too thin, use two pieces to make a sandwich.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by Cinrad
reply to post by jude11
 


Not able to atm, it is very fine crumbed, and flat like a pizza base, I roll it out with an oiled rolling pin. I cut it into squares about the size of a slice of bread for my kids' sandwiches, one of them is alergic to yeast. If it is is a bit too thick, slice it down the middle, if too thin, use two pieces to make a sandwich.


Have you tried a little baking powder for a slight rise? Should work as it's basically biscuit material.


A little unsweetened apple sauce will help in the binding as well. Less crumbly.

Peace



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Will try that, have heaps of apples atm.

For you silly yaks (coeliacs) out there, or gluten intolerant, I havent got around to it yet, but has anyone tried to mash potatoes in a food processor before? They go gluey, not sure what happens but maybe the short starch grains align and form long strings or something. I have been meaning to do it on purpose and incorporate gluten free flour in the mix and see if I can make a dough out of it that stays together and captures the yeast or baking soda's gas bubbles better. Havent got any GF flour at the moment and it is the busiest two months of the year for me, but if someone can give it a go, let me know if it works.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by Cinrad
reply to post by jude11
 


Will try that, have heaps of apples atm.

For you silly yaks (coeliacs) out there, or gluten intolerant, I havent got around to it yet, but has anyone tried to mash potatoes in a food processor before? They go gluey, not sure what happens but maybe the short starch grains align and form long strings or something. I have been meaning to do it on purpose and incorporate gluten free flour in the mix and see if I can make a dough out of it that stays together and captures the yeast or baking soda's gas bubbles better. Havent got any GF flour at the moment and it is the busiest two months of the year for me, but if someone can give it a go, let me know if it works.


We specialize in GF baking and I can tell you that a potato starch combined with tapioca works wonders for a bind.

I also forgot to mention that when short of apples, bananas work wonderful as well.

Peace



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Fantastic thread! S&F

When I treid posting to it last night, the screen would freeze then log me out of ATS. hmmmmmm



posted on Mar, 27 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 

Brilliant! Just building one ourselves, here if Greece. Can't wait to bake our sourdough bread in it.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I think you can find this at a few powwows, not to mention on the rez. Frybread is good too and uses basically the same ingredients. I'd walk a mile for frybread.



posted on Apr, 4 2013 @ 09:51 PM
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I have a bowl of the original sitting in my fridge right now, white flour only, and I added a tablespoon of sugar to the yeast mix.
I don't usually do a white bread.
That stuff's dangerous to a diet.
Far to easy to break off a piece and roll in some raisins, currants, or apples, and fry up a chunk, then roll in sugar


Yesterday I grabbed a chunk, rolled in citrus candied peel and currants, baked up a little round loaf (I use my cast iron fry pan in the oven).
I ate the whole thing! In one sitting!
It was the most perfect texture this time, ever.



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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A couple international cultures taught me how to make noodles and flatbread.

The way the Japanese noodle chefs make ramen, by piling flour and salt and water together and then stepping on the dough with their feet, then using a big pole to roll the dough out and then hang cut noodles up to dry was the first lesson.

Then the Indian way of cooking flatbreads was the cheapest and quickest way. They might be mistaken for tortillas. Flour and water, salt if you have money, on a griddle, easy for fillings and dippings which involve lots of spices because bread gets boring after a summer of it. Best sauce ever is the honey with ginger.

It's all good until you get Celiac or gluten sensitivities. Orchards are a good investment for that problem.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:00 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
And another that I have tried, perfected and love!

No yeast bread:

Ingredients
4 cups flour
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tbsp baking soda
1½ cups water
2 tsp vinegar (cider or white) Have tried it without and works ok too.

Combine dry ingredients and mix. Combine water and vinegar. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix. Turn dough out onto floured surface and knead for two or three minutes (no need to overdo it). Shape into a round (about 1½ to 2 inches high), then place on pan. Dip a sharp knife into flour and cut an 'X' into the top of the loaf. Bake 40 minutes.


I am super curious about this. I have made no yeast breads before but with vinegar? May I ask, what does the vinegar do? Is it for flavor? So is this cooked at 350 for 40 minutes? I cannot wait to try.
Love this post BTW and thank you for it. I thought I knew it all when it came to bread making. Boy was I wrong! I have been making my own yeast and vinegar for about a year now



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


It worked,I threw in some flavor and it actually tasted good.Thanks,I owe you a recipe.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:34 PM
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Originally posted by SarnholeOntarable
reply to post by jude11
 


It worked,I threw in some flavor and it actually tasted good.Thanks,I owe you a recipe.


Like tomatoes?

Throw in a can of whole tomatoes with all the juice/water from the can and then top off with hot water to the level of liquid needed. (The hot water mixes with the tomatoes to form a warm liquid for your yeast rising time.) Then throw in a 300 gram pack of frozen or fresh spinach.


And then ...


Peace



posted on Dec, 11 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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These bread recipes all look good but, if you were using them in a SHTF scenario, where would you find an oven that is still usable without electricity or gas? I would be most interested in pan bread recipes that can be cooked over a fire or in a makeshift brick oven.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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MickeyMouga
These bread recipes all look good but, if you were using them in a SHTF scenario, where would you find an oven that is still usable without electricity or gas? I would be most interested in pan bread recipes that can be cooked over a fire or in a makeshift brick oven.


Actually most of these breads (especially the first in the OP) can be baked in a brick oven.

Look thru the first page or so for some excellent vids and info on building brick ovens or/and making bannock. Good stuff in a SHTF scenario.


Peace



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 11:21 PM
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well, the yeast would be a problem. it must be kept cold for any length of time.

we have a machine. it does well. i'm not one to do it by hand, tho.

baking is not my forte'. i can, just not what i like to do.

in a shtf situation, i would hit the corn breads. just need the right pan.

or matzoh.



posted on May, 21 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: jude11

Thank you, jude11, for this info! There's a lot of good survival info here. Love bread!



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed
a reply to: jude11

Thank you, jude11, for this info! There's a lot of good survival info here. Love bread!



Hope it helps.

Welcome!

Peace





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