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This Bread recipe could be the difference between starving/eating in the times ahead.

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posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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Originally posted by virraszto
Thanks for the great bread recipes. I'm going to try them as soon as I can.

Here's another very easy bread that I have made, and love. It has only these ingredients.
The crust is nice and crunchy. You'll have to watch the video for the directions because
I don't have mine handy.


No Knead Bread
3 C. flour
3/4 tsp yeast
1 1/2 c water
1 1/4 tsp salt


Small correction: use 1/4 tsp yeast is what I heard on the video.




posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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Happy to see another bread maker here. I will toss in a few "quick" bread recipes later on tonight, if thats good with you all. Nothing like some fresh, quick bread on a cold evening.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by RicketyCricket
 


Absolutely! Toss in as many recipes and tips as you like!

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


Yes, that's what the video does say. However, after a lot of experimenting I found my adjustment to 3/4 tsp to work out much better.

If you look at my final version, it ended up being what I sold in my bakery with the spices added as well.

Good luck!



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by minigunner
reply to post by jude11
 



When you say sponge, are you referring to an actual sponge? Can you elaborate, this is all very interesting and thank you for sharing with us,

Respectfully,

M


There is a great explanation of the sponge on this site. Link at the bottom.

BTW...I believe the oldest "sponge" is over 200 yrs old used in a bakery in San Fransisco.

Here's some info:


"The sponge method for leavening bread is an intermediate method of creating a starter that combines some of the benefits of the direct method with the some of the benefits of the sourdough starter method. Less time is required using the sponge method than with the sourdough method, but the results provide hints of the depth of flavor and texture that result from the sourdough method. Although yeast is used with the sponge method, the quantity is usually much less than when preparing bread with the direct method. Two of the most widely used sponge starters are the French "poolish" and the Italian "biga.""


More...

www.recipetips.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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Kitchen Hack: One-Minute Bread (Ciabatta):

Had to be someone out there to take a simple 5 min bread recipe and bring it down to 1 min bread. So similar that I wonder what the difference is but I think he is just moving faster. lol

Anyway:

For your ciabatta you’ll need:

* 4 cups of all-purpose flour (do NOT pack the flour into the measuring cup)
* 2 cups of warm water
* 1 teaspoon of salt
* 1/4 teaspoon of granulated yeast (or equivalent)

For the gorgeous readers needing metric equivalents of this recipe, Toon left a comment with the following conversion:

* 500 grams of all-purpose flour
* 4,7 deciliter of warm water
* 4 grams of salt (= 1 teaspoon = 5 ml)
* 1 gram of dry yeast (= 1/4 teaspoon = 1,25 ml)

You’ll also need a medium-size mixing bowl, a 10×15 cookie sheet or baking stone, a hand towel or plastic wrap, and whatever you’d like to keep your bread from sticking (if you’re using a pan, I use flour and corn meal).

Have everything handy? Good. Let’s do this!

Here it is with pics:

www.lifehack.org...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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If Kids can make an outdoor oven, so can you!




posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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What an amazing thread! S&F

You all have answered so many of the questions I've had about yeast and flour and fire during a SHTF scenerio. I have already stocked up on grains, nuts, dried fruits and flours. Recently I threw away some corn meal with weavels. Should have just frozen it then sifted it. Dang!

Well now I know about a better storage system. Thanks. Can't wait to start baking!



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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Ok,

Here's another bit of info posted on my other thread, on another site, far-far away:

Note: I have not tried this but more and more I am hearing about the benefits of sprouts and this recipe comes from...

sproutpeople.org...

If anyone has more info and results to share, I'm sure it will be appreciated by many. I do know however, that sprouts are easy to grow and can be found naturally in many forms so pay attention to these little things and take notice around you in your yard and when out camping.

Ingredients and Preparation

Makes 2 - 3 loaves

To soften yeast - combine in a large bowl:
2 1/2 cups warm water
2 scant Tbs. active dry yeast
Allow the yeast to proof (bubble) for 5 minutes

Stir in - in this order:

1/2 cup oil
We generally use Safflower or Sunflower

1/2 cup honey

1 Tbs. salt

2 Cups Sprouted Grains - whole or ground lightly
We grind our big grains in a food processor. Our kids prefer them ground up quite well.

4 cups flour.
Any combo of wheat, rye, white, what-have-you that you like.
Beat well.
Cover and let this 'sponge' sit for 45-60 minutes.

Stir down and gradually add:
3-4 cups flour (any combination)

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth.

Place dough into a greased bowl - turn it over and around to coat the whole of the dough.

Cover and let rise until doubled (60-90 minutes).

Knead dough down in the bowl, divide and shape into 2 - 3 oblong loaves.
Place in well greased loaf pans and cover.

Let rise 60 minutes or until almost doubled.

Bake at 375º for 35 to 40 minutes.

Remove loaves from pans and cool on wire racks.

Serve

As you like it.

Notes

* Mix and match grain sprouts to your heart's content.
When using whole wheat and/or rye flours you might add wheat gluten - at a rate of 1/8 cup per cup of flour - as it often produces a nicer loaf.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


In a time of need, those little weevils can be kept in the bread for protein. Sounds gross I agree, but protein will be needed and you will never notice the little buggers in there anyway. lol

Think of them as little shrimp. What is shrimp anyway? Just ocean bugs that feed off the excrement of everything else that swims.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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Hey Jude, (lol)

Wanted to ask you a question - Have you ever used a cast Iron dutch oven, in your home oven, to create a nice crispy crust and soft chewy inside, for your sourdoughs? I started doing that instead of steam pans, and notice that the bread's own moisture and the steam it creates, seems to work rather well. I generally dont use the steam pan anymore.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by RicketyCricket
Hey Jude, (lol)

Wanted to ask you a question - Have you ever used a cast Iron dutch oven, in your home oven, to create a nice crispy crust and soft chewy inside, for your sourdoughs? I started doing that instead of steam pans, and notice that the bread's own moisture and the steam it creates, seems to work rather well. I generally dont use the steam pan anymore.


Have tried this in my Pro Convection Ovens in the bakery. I have found that the easiest way to achieve a crispy crust is to put an empty pan in the oven when preheating (cast preferably) and just before putting the bread in, sprinkle a bit of water on the pan (watch out for the steam plume!), quickly put the bread in and close.

With a convection oven you can just sprinkle water on the bottom of the oven itself. No harm as no elements.

Hope this answers your question.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by jdb51
These bread recipes are going to go into my survival cabinet for sure, along with the directions for making "lights" out of plastic bottles, water and bleach!


Sorry if this is a little off-topic but can someone tell me what "making lights out of plastic bottles, water and bleach means"?

TFN



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by TruthFreedomNow

Originally posted by jdb51
These bread recipes are going to go into my survival cabinet for sure, along with the directions for making "lights" out of plastic bottles, water and bleach!


Sorry if this is a little off-topic but can someone tell me what "making lights out of plastic bottles, water and bleach means"?

TFN


Was wondering this myself.

I don't think it's off topic too much as we need light to make bread right? lol

I may be wrong but maybe the bleach produces phosphorous?

Perhaps the poster can share?

Thanks.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


Never tried the acorn approach but I have tasted cattail bread and found it to be delicious. Many people don't realize that cattail root is also very delicious when baked on an open fire.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

I don't know how to link, but it is in the survival forum here. How to turn a liter bottle into a 50 watt light. I read it here last year, and just now searched for it. Hope this helps!



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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"...light to make bread. "
Thanks for the hospitality Jude.


Thanks for the link jbd51. I get it now. Like Jude I was expecting some type of reaction but it's as simple as simple can be. Which makes it doable in times of crisis....and warmer climates.


Jude, do you know if you can sprout grains and then use them to make flour for bread? For example sprout wheat berries and then grind them for flour. The spouts would have to be dry before they can go through a flour grinder, right? I wonder if you could sprout them, let them dry and then grind them. Or if that would defeat the purpose. I had a look at the sprouting website you linked to but it's pretty extensive so thought I'd ask first just in case you know the answer off the top of your head.

Thanks for a great thread.

TFN



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by TruthFreedomNow
 


Have to say that my knowledge of the sprout World is not as good as that site at all. That site was brought to my attention on my other thread...you know that forum, far-far away? lol

Anyway, bread can be made from almost anything as long as there is a binder of sorts. The gluten in flour for example can be replaced with Xantham Gum and/or Guar Gum when making Gluten Free bread from rice, bean flour etc.

Depending on your base, it will dictate the amount and type of binders.

Hope this helps.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Hey Jude. (LOL. A song rings in my ears every time I hear that phrase...)


Thought you might be interested in the answer to the question I had asked you...

I did some research and apparently you can sprout wheat berries and then dehydrate them before grinding to make flour for bread. I think I might give it a try and see how it goes sometime. I'll let you know if/when I do.

TFN



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 11:07 AM
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Originally posted by TruthFreedomNow
Hey Jude. (LOL. A song rings in my ears every time I hear that phrase...)


Thought you might be interested in the answer to the question I had asked you...

I did some research and apparently you can sprout wheat berries and then dehydrate them before grinding to make flour for bread. I think I might give it a try and see how it goes sometime. I'll let you know if/when I do.

TFN


Hey Thanks!

Would love to hear and see (pics please!) of the results. As I mentioned, I have heard but never tried.

Good luck.






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