It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Protein Found In Brain Cells May Be Key To Autism

page: 2
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:34 PM
link   
reply to post by AQuestion
 


Well said, Aquestion, I have to monitor my insensitivity --always-- . (Lots of times I'm lazy and don't!)




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:40 PM
link   
reply to post by simone50m
 


"I eat and take up a little space. And that's all."

You sound like a terrific person!

When we finally received the diagnosis I apologized to my then 10-year-old for all of the years of yelling and tears, as I was trying to make a square peg fit into a round hole. (I did the same thing with her twin a year earlier when we received his diagnosis.)

The best thing I ever did was pull them out of the school system, which was crushing their souls because they weren't "normal". They now learn at home and they're flourishing.

I have told both of them that I want them to turn a passion into a small business by the time they're 16. I don't care if they start out making $10 per year. By the time they're 26 they can say they've been in business for 10 years.

My thinking is, even if they graduate from university (and that's our aim) they may not be hired because they're different. By developing a business early, they will shape the world the way they want it to be, without having to worry about financial risk.

I wish the world had been more compassionate when you were growing up, but as a species, I think we're getting there, albeit very slowly.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:43 PM
link   
reply to post by ampar84
 


Dear ampar84,

I am 51. I remember being 8, hated it. I hated school and did not like being around childish behaviour. I felt that way because I didn't understand the way people acted. If we are kept in the mainstream we can get past it. I don't like it when we are seperated out, makes us feel even more hated and odd, it also slows down our learning to deal with normal people. But, with loving parents, like yourself, we can get through these times.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:43 PM
link   
reply to post by AQuestion
 


Indeed!

Michaelangelo was thought to have Asperger's Syndrome. Imagine how much less beautiful the world would have been if society had tried to "fix" him.

edit on 20-3-2011 by Reaching because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Reaching
 


Dear Reaching,

Starting in business is hard for us; but, we do get hired eventually and then our skills carry us way beyond. I have personally changed four industries and am known internationally as an expert in certain things. I understand you wanting to protect your children and do know how terribly hard it is for many of us in school. Many of us cannot take it; but, if we can we get to grow even more. I am very glad that you have a plan for your children and pray it is what is best for your kids, you know them better than anyone else does.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by AQuestion
reply to post by ampar84
 


Dear ampar84,

I am 51. I remember being 8, hated it. I hated school and did not like being around childish behaviour. I felt that way because I didn't understand the way people acted. If we are kept in the mainstream we can get past it. I don't like it when we are seperated out, makes us feel even more hated and odd, it also slows down our learning to deal with normal people. But, with loving parents, like yourself, we can get through these times.


Yes! Ah! This is amazing hearing from adults (and other parents of kids with Aspergers) My son can't stand his younger brother when he's acting like a crazy 4 year old. They are fine and very loving (sometimes I feel like my son only really connects with his brother) when my youngest is being calm. But he just turned 4, so often times he acts like a big baby! lol And it really agitates my oldest. He gets along much better with the 10 and 12 year old neighbors that we have.
Also, my son just does not understand WHY he gets separated sometimes at school. They had a field trip on friday and I'm sure he was being his usual self (very excited and fascinated about everything! He LOVES outings) and he was very upset that he had to ride by himself on the bus. It breaks my heart... I've debated on homeschooling him. He has such a wonderful and uplifting spirit about him and I don't want that crushed. But I also want him to learn how to function in this society of ours.I hope we find a good balance along the way.
The worst part of all of this has been the school system. You'd think by now, they would be more accepting of "disorders" of all types. But the teachers just want their jobs to be easy. If it wasn't for the stress of school, I would have never sought a diagnosis. He's perfect the way he is! I see the world differently because of him.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:55 PM
link   
reply to post by AQuestion
 


Thank you AQuestion.

I have struggled with whether removing them from the soul crushing school system was the right choice, but they are so happy and relaxed now, and doing so much better academically.

My best friend is a very accomplished teacher, in the same school system, and she too believes we made the right move.

I have told them they can return whenever they want; it will be their choice. I just don't want them to ever spend another day questioning themselves because they're "not normal."

Thanks for the insight regarding starting a business, it's very helpful to know that it may be challenging.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 07:18 PM
link   
I am the same age as AQuestion. It seems to me that --awareness-- about Auts is --recent-- . I was always called "shy". There was the trauma of violence at home, then when I went to The Public School System, the teachers had this big wooden paddle. I remember it seemed like every day, I was watching this same one kid get it. They would bring him up in front of the class and paddle him in front of us. In retrospect, he was DEFINITELY an Auts, but the kind which could not, for one second, sit still. This grade school was mostly African American children who were poor. My brother checked into what ever became of a couple boys he knew there, and (one or both) went away for 'serious time', stuff like armed robbery.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 07:24 PM
link   
I just have to reply to this, I have aspergers and wouldn't change it for anything now. I admit as a kid I might have but I didnt know nor did my parents(although now that I look back I had many symptoms). Its not easy growing up not knowing why your different but just know you are. I dont know about the lack of empathy persay, I spent many days and nights as a kid sleeping in the barn with all the cats I had lol and loved them all, people though I suppose oddly it was a different story. Couldn't quite understand them, always seemed like people would get emotional and illogical so fast it would make my head spin.. still does really. Heck I remember for the longest time in high school just smiling and not saying anything when people talked to me or picked on me for said behavior, had no idea whatsoever how to deal with it. At any rate Im quite happy with who I am, smart, logical and above all who I want to be not what society seems to think everyone should be.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 08:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by ampar84

Yes! Ah! This is amazing hearing from adults (and other parents of kids with Aspergers) My son can't stand his younger brother when he's acting like a crazy 4 year old. They are fine and very loving (sometimes I feel like my son only really connects with his brother) when my youngest is being calm. But he just turned 4, so often times he acts like a big baby! lol And it really agitates my oldest. He gets along much better with the 10 and 12 year old neighbors that we have.
Also, my son just does not understand WHY he gets separated sometimes at school. They had a field trip on friday and I'm sure he was being his usual self (very excited and fascinated about everything! He LOVES outings) and he was very upset that he had to ride by himself on the bus. It breaks my heart... I've debated on homeschooling him. He has such a wonderful and uplifting spirit about him and I don't want that crushed. But I also want him to learn how to function in this society of ours.I hope we find a good balance along the way.
The worst part of all of this has been the school system. You'd think by now, they would be more accepting of "disorders" of all types. But the teachers just want their jobs to be easy. If it wasn't for the stress of school, I would have never sought a diagnosis. He's perfect the way he is! I see the world differently because of him.


I want to start by thanking the original poster, I believe this thread may be a positive thing. It is good for all of us who deal with autism to talk to one another. Sorry if I hijacked it. If you prefer we can start a new thread on dealing with autism.

Dear ampar84,

The school system is made up of teachers who are taught to train large numbers of people at simple things. I didn't understand that while I was in school, I just couldn't figure out why adults couldn't understand me, a child. Those of us who went to school in the 60s with Aspergers were few and far between. Teachers do not like being corrected by 6 year olds and have no idea what to do with us. That is not going to change. Think about the challenges we present to our own parents and then put that on someone who is just trying to do a job.

I wish I could tell you how much we can take before being crushed. It is individual. I was hard headed, ruthless and calculating beyond all comprehension. My gift is the ability to see patterns not math or music. How odd was I, I dreamed the solution to the Rubiks cube and it was right. I think one thing that helped was accepting that I was different rather than not wanting to be like everyone else, that gives us the strength to not be crushed; but, it has to be our motivator.

It was so long ago; but, I still remember feeling like a freak and wanting to "fit in". The problem was that I could beat normal people at so many things, I loved the feeling of knowing things, mysteries to everyone else. I didn't want to and cannot imagine not having my gifts (and I didn't always see it as a gift). You might ask your son if he would trade his gift (whatever it is) to be like everyone else. I bet he says no. From there you can explain to him the he is special because his gift is unique and just for him.

Something they discovered about Aspergers, there is a genome that we all have in common; but, it is in a different place for each of us. No two people with Aspergers has the same gift and each gift is unique to the person, we are the only one that has it. Each of us has the ability to know a truth that nobody else it the world will know until we tell them. Was growing up hard, it felt like torture everyday of my life. Would I give it up, never, it made me strong, confident and more social. The ones who can grow the most must experience the most pressure or we never reach our potential. I wanted to reach my potential and that meant learning to deal with it and putting up with the flack we get, to face normal people head on and never back down. I have softened since then; but, I needed to do that when I was young to survive. I hate to say this; but, if your son has Aspergers it is going to be tough on him, period; but, if he holds on tight the payoff is wonderful.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 11:58 PM
link   
This is nothing new, it was already discovered in Saudi Arabia quite afew years ago. I'll have to dig deep for the report as it was about 13 years ago I read it.



posted on Apr, 21 2011 @ 09:05 AM
link   
Hello All,

I noticed this article on MSN yesterday about the growing number of young adults with autism and how society is grossly unprepared to help this important group of people.

In many ways, autism is such a gift. My daughter has Asperger's Syndrome and while every parent quite rightfully thinks their child is special, my little girl is such an extraordinarily beautiful person.

It's absolutely wrong that apparently employers can't see all that people with autism have to offer the world.

health.msn.com...



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 12:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Reaching
 


I saw that article too. Today, Sunday as I'm typing this, I am simultaneously listening to my subscribed podcast of CoastToCoast last night, where Ian Punnit interviews a -- fascinating -- guest, Dr. Barbara Oakly. They are talking about pathologies such as pathological altruism and empathy and non empathy. She said her next book will be about Narcissists.
I have **ALL** the symtpms for Aspergers, EXCEPT I am so empathetic (empathic?) While simultaneously displaying pretty cold insensitivity -- occassionally-- , which is based on what I can sense is **truly** going on in the 'target' person's mind. For example, a guy who is trying to be friendly to me, when I KNOW for a fact, that he has a sexual-interest agenda/attraction (which is NOT mutually shared.) I am remembering a previous poster in this thread, who said he would stay in the barn to love on all the cats out there. (Nuthin wrong with that!) And I am still questioning: THIS NON EMPATHY thing connected with Aspergers. Is it largely misunderstood, based on ignorance?




top topics



 
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join