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Sacramento Under Alert

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posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:36 AM
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reply to post by Pimpish
 


Not sure what security measures your facility has, but one of the main things i would watch for would be setting up of a quarentine area. The hospital would never risk the safety of its other patients interacting with potential radioactive patients.




posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:39 AM
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I live in Sacramento, It's been raining here all day. Do you think the rain should keep the air cleaner? This post freaks me out. I had to work out doors all day. I also keep an eye on radiationnetwork.com and it seems normal but then again I am sure the device used to monitor radiation is probably inside someones house. I would think that San Fransico would get it first. I bet the hospitals in downtown sac will get alot of visits for this and I suspect most will be from peoples nerves are shot from worry.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by xaphoocom
 


Definately people will convince themselves they have been exposed. The placebo effect is very powerful in the medical field. This is a shame because it will take resources away from people who have legitamte medical problems, while the hospital tries to weed through the people who are just scared and think they are sick.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:45 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


I'm not on-site, I work from home...I just have acess to look at medical reports from many hospitals.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by Pimpish
 


Then i would guess you would see lab reports. In radiation poisoning cases they will do frequent blood tests over several days which enable medical personnel to look for drops in disease-fighting white blood cells and abnormal changes in the DNA of blood cells. These factors indicate the degree of bone marrow damage, which is determined by the level of an absorbed dose.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by xaphoocom
 


Yeah it scared me too at first, but I was sort of shaken awake by it. Upon reading some responses and the NYT link regarding the EPA statement I can say I feel a bit better and will be able to sleep tonight.


I am sure it's just a precautionary measure that people are getting called in... wouldn't you rather have staff standing by and doing nothing than need them and not have them?

Anyways, thanks for the replies folks, have a good nite...

Khar



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:01 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


Yeah, but really they do lab tests on nearly everyone that goes to the emergency room now a days. I can't remember the last time I typed a report that didn't have CBC, chemistries, LFTs at the least. I still haven't seen any new reports come in as of yet, though it would probably take a couple hours before I saw the first one even assuming something was going on. I see no trauma reports and there doesn't seem to be an increase in any emergency room reports, op reports or H&Ps.

But, i will be up for about another 6 hours or so and I'll check in and report anything unusual, though again, I can only be so specific, I won't be able to mention hospital names, even.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:06 AM
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reply to post by Kharron
 


I would have to agree. Places are taking extra precautions incase people do start to have a reaction. As far as weather goes we recieved 4 inches of snow yesterday out of the blue. Been smelling like an old xerox machine for the past couple of days as well.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:09 AM
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It is not my intention to single out any specific posters, nor to pick on anyone. So please don't take it as that. I am just really confused, right now, about how radiation behaves and about some things that I have seen posted over the past few days.

I have seen posts about the possibility of increased radiation levels being detected due to planes landing with people in them who have radiation sickness.

Q: What happens when people, who have been exposed to high levels of radiation, board planes from one spot and land in another? This is probably a very silly question for those who know a lot about this subject, but it has been on my mind this afternoon and I do not know much about radiation. What I specifically want to know is, can they carry the radiation with them? Or is it not a matter of being on their bodies but rather inside of their bodies at this point? So is it being suggested, by those who are posting about the planes, that the detection of increased radiation is coming from these people filled with non-harmful (to others) radiation and not necessarily from a threat of radiation clouds or from radiation being carried on the people?



I have also seen posting about looking for signs which include quarantine for the people with radiation sickness, in order to prevent others from becoming sick.

Q: I thought that radiation sickness can not be spread from person to person and that the possibility of people carrying radiation on them was minimal. That is what I am getting from this link. But am I just not reading the information correctly?

And I do realize that emotions are high right now and intentions can be misjudged. Please do not feel singled out if I have posted about something which you may have mentioned. I am truly just trying to understand what this all means and I am feeling very unsure of what I may be interpreting from the information.

I see that we have a couple of medical professionals here so I am hoping that you will know.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by idunno12
 


they detected radiation in the planes air system as well, could be from being on clothes.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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reply to post by idunno12
 


I am by no means an expert on radiation exposure. I am just a lowly paramedic. But it is my understaning that if a person comes into contact with a contaminated person that has not been stripped and cleaned that the particulates can be transmitted to that person. Now in order to get radiation poisoning from a contaminated person, the contaminated person would have to have so much radiation on them that they would more than likely be already dead.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by idunno12
 


Technically I work in the medical field, I also know lots of medical terminology, but I am definitely NOT a medical expert.

I do have a couple of decent links with some information for you though.

Cancer prevention: What you need to know

The EPA also put this up: Japan Nuclear Emergency: Frequently asked questions



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by Kharron
 


Might have something to do with plane loads of people from Japan with high radiation readings?



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 02:54 AM
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reply to post by Pimpish
 


Thank you I will read the information which you posted.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by idunno12
 

Just wanted to let you know I starred you for your politeness

Hard to come by these days.
Peace and



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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Sacramento was showing higher readings than normal yesterday when I checked the CDX website, but that amount will not impact human health. (The human body is capable of dealing very well with small amounts or short duration of radiation.)

The levels are normal in Sacramento at the moment. No need to worry.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by idunno12
 


Just read your post, no one should be offended your just asking questions, so here are some answers.
I used to work in a nuclear plant, with spent fuel rods, so I guess that probobly gives me some rather more experience than most.

Radiation in nearly any form is a partical. Its like a tiny dust mote. It gets on your skin or clothing, and stays there until it is removed, or is absorbed into the skin. It is miniscule, nearly microscopic, thats why it can be easily transferred by wind, rain, or steam etc. Particals are very hard to pinpoint even with a hand held detector. People who have come in contact with radiation particals can carry them in several ways-on thier clothing, hair, skin, or other items on thier person. This is when those particals can be transferred from one person to another, by touching the infected person, and having the particals rub off onto your person. In this form it is not a disease, its an object that is transferable.

Once a partical/ or particals has absorbed into the skin, that person is literally radioactive. (This is what happens with radioactive chemo, and certain stress tests-many people who have had treatments will set off the radiation detectors at air ports or other places, and often carry an identifying card that describes their treatment, and the resulting radiation readings). Once that person is radioactive, they can no longer transfer the radiation to another person, as long as they no longer have any particals on thier skin or clothing. The amount of radiation the person gives off is in direct correlation to the amount of exposure they have had. By the time someone exposed to radiation would emit a lethal or sickening dose to another person just by being in close proximity, the exposed person would probobly be near death, or have already passed away.
Radiation sickness is called a sickness because it is nearly none transferable. Once a person is sick from radiation exposure the radiation particals have already entered thier body, the result is they are sick, not diseased as one would think of say for instance the flu. It doesnt work that way.

Ways to reduce exposure:
1) dont come in contact with it in the first place(kinda goes without saying.
2) If you do come in contact with radiation particals wash throughally IN A SHOWER(not a bath) with soap and water, and get tested with a hand held detector.
3) Stay in doors during fallout.Without the oppurtunity to come in contact with radioactive particals, you greatly reduce the chances of picking up particals.
4) For those of you who have to work out doors, shower immediately upon coming inside to lessen the chances of particals remaining on your skin.

Just a note: Those bright yellow suits you see on folks working in radioactive areas- they are made from a fiber much like a HEPA filter. They have a tight enough weave to prevent particals from getting on your skin. There isa specific way to remove them-from the top down so that everythng falls off away from your skin.

Hope this helps



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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Well now Washington's detector is down on radiation network...has been all morning for me. Anyone know anything? (related to the detector!
)



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by superman2012
 


Washington and Washington D.C both showing normal readings.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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It's actually not the radiation, the radiation is what allows us to detect radioactive particulates.

The particulates are what we are worried about.

It gets spread because everything that these highly energetic and rapidly decaying particles land everywhere on everything. They get dispersed and spread out over vast distances.

Everyone keeps lying to themselves in the hope that things aren't as bad as they actually are.

That's understandable though, but it is frustrating me because this situation is absolutely dire and people are blowing it off as not a very big deal.

Just a few particles of Cesium 137 scares the crap out of me.

Please read up on the subject before you go around misleading folks about how safe things are.
Cesium 137 wiki

And check out the Goiania Incident, where just a tiny little bit of Cesium 137 caused a huge accident situation and many people suffered directly as a result. (And there were fatalities also).
Goiania accident wiki

Also check out the Acerinox Accident (wiki)



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