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Elderly patients left to die in hospital six miles from Japan's stricken nuclear power plant

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posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


Those people are paid to take care of them and they didnt. Would you like someone like that taking care of the elderly in your family?? if it was me of course id stay there and help...hell id be a part of the fukushima 50 if i could.




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
It surprises me that this would happen in Japan, as they generally hold their elderly in high esteem. It is difficult to say though, how exactly the abandonment came about. We really need more details.



Exactly. It is against everything that I have learned, admired, and personally seen exhibited
by persons of the Japanese & Asian cultures. I guess in the face of adversity, some people change.






edit on 3/18/2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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Yes, we certainly need the details.
Did they have the means (proper vehicles) to evacuate them?
How many?
How many patients per vehicle?

Those of you who would try to save them....tell me exactly how you would do this?



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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I work in a nursing home,and i am sure it happens in hospitals to when a emergency arises and you have to evacuate, fires, tornados whatever,you start by the ones who can walk first then wheelchair and then the bedridden,the reason for that is you save as many as you can,and it might sound inhuman if some of the bedridden patients might not be saved,but it would be a greater loss of life to try to get them all out at the same time,I mean i hope i could save them all but sometimes it is not humanly possible



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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Sorry to post this here, but i do not have enough posts to make my own thread apparently. I came across this heartbreaking story from japan. I feel so bad for these kids.

www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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Welcome to the real world of disasters. So many people in the Western world think that the world owes them a living--life in this instance. That is not to be when things start falling apart. If anyone is to be left to die in the cold, allowed to go hungry or without medication, it MUST be the old and infirm if they cannot function on their own. And even if they are functional and alert, it is their place to die if someone most likely will die, willingly sacrificing themselves in some way, or simply ignored if there are younger mothers and children to be given better care.

Life can get brutal and brutal choices are to be made in seconds sometimes even if the consequences linger.. And brutal choices will be made when it is a typical "Everyman for himself" type of situation. It is after all, human nature. Take yourself for example, whomever you are, would you willing abandon an aged relative, friend, neighbor or stranger to save a young child? Look at that short list of "aged relative, friend, neighbor or stranger." Be honest, if you were following along with this discussion, I'll bet you automatically prioritized in the back of your mind who you would help and who you would help less, to put it mildly.

I''m past being old. I'm elderly. If the much talked about SHTF every comes, I intend to find a local family to help and support to the full extent of and including my life. Somebody must survive and produce children for the next generation.

We all would give our lives for our offspring which is just a personalized version of the last sentence. We probably all also would give our lives for some nameless face more than likely far younger than ourselves if a choice had to be made. Again, I'll bet many of us would agree to do so, especially if we were bed bound or nearly so and parked in an old age home.

As for this story, we don't know the details. similar things happened in New Orleans during Katrina. Who do we want to blame when these things happen? The Japanese culture honors the elderly far more so than people of the Western nations, but sometimes, in an instant hard decisions must be made.

Was it a cruel abandonment or a logical choice. I'm not going to pretend to guess.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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It is shocking.... But don't forget that the nursing staff that abandoned the care home might of had children and families of their own to attend to...


Most of the abandoned patients were in coma


While it might seem heartless there was probably no way of moving the patients and if I was there I would be 100% more concerned with getting my 2yr old to safety than several elderly people in coma's. I suspect that the more mobile patients were moved and that staff did their best.
edit on 18/3/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by jasmine23
 


Not sure if this totally applies to topic but, I am a paramedic and in 2009 I was part of a bunch of ambulances that were evacuating a major hospital in Fargo, ND during a major flood of the Red River. The way the hospital was set up was such that the ICU and critical patients were on the upper floors. Because the river was rising we worked from the bottom up getting patients out of there. There was no triage as we know it per se whether they could walk or not. Everyone knew there was a risk that the river could make it such that we may not be able to get the ones in the upper floors out due to flooding but we had to start somewhere.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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One thing people are forgetting is the type of disaster that is eminent,a fire you have some warning,same as tornado,when the earthquake hit i am sure they had some plan to get the sick and elderly out,they did not forsee the tsunami which hit in a instant



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


Of course many of those who abandoned the elderly in Katrina later faced criminal charges as noted here:


June 22, 2006 – Few, especially senior citizens, will forget last year's nightmare of St. Rita’s Nursing Home, where the owners were charged with 34 counts of negligent homicide, following the destruction by the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina. That horror is spurring action this year to better protect older Americans living in long-term care communities. Earlier this month, for example, long-term care providers in St. Petersburg, Florida, took part in PREPARE - a new educational training program designed to protect seniors in long-term care facilities from disasters such as hurricanes, pandemics, bioterrorism and other disasters.


Source: seniorjournal.com...
edit on 3/18/2011 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by jasmine23
 


Very true and valid point. A tsunami is one of those disasters that does not allow you much warning to do large scale evacuations.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by lcbjr1979
Sorry to post this here, but i do not have enough posts to make my own thread apparently. I came across this heartbreaking story from japan. I feel so bad for these kids.

www.dailymail.co.uk...


oh god now THAT is heart breaking
I hope to god that someone comes to get them, god thats really distressed me


ETA you can make that thread now you have 20 posts xx
edit on 18/3/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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I don't know about other towns,but that is just a rule of thumb here in texas hospitals and nursing homes,we have fire drills,we have tornado drills, we have to physical go through a mock evacuation and that means moving residents,any major disaster that might strike we are being trained how to save them,but if it came down to a choice,do i save Mr. Jones who is in a coma,are do i save Mrs Carol who walks and still has her mental powers,but is just not able to take her meds by herself, i would save Mrs Carol



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:49 PM
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There are more than a few stories like this floating around here in Japan right now. Very sad.

But what is worse is that one gets the distinct impression those left who got irradiated are stuck there and it seems that's the way the PTB want it to be.

Is it OK for irradiated people to leave now? I don't know how many thousands must have been exposed to lethal doses of radiation and the figure is so high I don't want to guess.

I expect they'll be added to some list in the futre as victims of the quake and the tsunami.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:49 PM
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Yes, it is very hard to walk away from the elderly and sick people.

I am old and sick. Please do not try to save me. Save yourself and children.

I have lived life and am ready to go to another place if need be.

This idea is not getting through to my son and daughter.

SYOA =save you own ---.

When I leave this life I want to be wide open, in my right mind and able to explore the feelings of my death.

Already been there but wasn't my time.

Don't deny an old person the right to die with a purpose and with dignity.

What more can we give but our lives that others may live.

Go and don't look back.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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Originally posted by jasmine23
I work in a nursing home,and i am sure it happens in hospitals to when a emergency arises and you have to evacuate, fires, tornados whatever,you start by the ones who can walk first then wheelchair and then the bedridden,the reason for that is you save as many as you can,and it might sound inhuman if some of the bedridden patients might not be saved,but it would be a greater loss of life to try to get them all out at the same time,I mean i hope i could save them all but sometimes it is not humanly possible

Getting the patients out of the building is easy - standard evacuation procedures are practised regularly.

But once you've got them outside - and remember people in the exclusion zone have been warned to avoid radiation by staying indoors - you've got to take them somewhere.
And how do you do this when the roads are blocked with debris, there is no fuel for your vehicles and there's no shelter agreeing to take them?

We don't even know if the carers rostered were still alive. We don't know if they had injured family of there own to look after. We don't know if they had anywhere safe left to go to for themselves.


It's stupid to point and judge when we don't know how the massive devastation affected the nursing home or the workers.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by dizziedame
 

I'm another oldie, and I agree with your post 100%.

If it's a choice between saving me or a youngster, of course the young'uns should be the ones looked after.







 
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