It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Outside In - A ride in a spaceship

page: 1
10

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 06:23 AM
link   


What would it look like to approach Saturn in a spaceship? One doesn't have to just imagine -- the Cassini spacecraft did just this in 2004, recording thousands of images along the way, and thousands more since entering orbit. Recently, some of these images have been digitally tweaked, cropped, and compiled into the above inspiring video which is part of a larger developing IMAX movie project named Outside In. In the last sequence, Saturn looms increasingly large on approach as cloudy Titan swoops below. With Saturn whirling around in the background, Cassini is next depicted flying over Mimas, with large Herschel Crater clearly visible. Saturn's majestic rings then take over the show as Cassini crosses Saturn's thin ring plane. Dark shadows of the ring appear on Saturn itself. Finally, the enigmatic ice-geyser moon Enceladus appears in the distance and then is approached just as the video clip ends.

Link

Visit the Link to view the above mentioned video composed entirely of still photographs from the Cassini-Huygens Mission at Saturn. What an awe-inspiring sight, I'm sure you all will enjoy.



Using hundreds of thousands of still images manipulated to create full motion, using “2.75D” photographic fly-through technology. The film will be presented in IMAX quality 5.6K resolution on massive screens and concert-level surround systems with a synchronized light show to audiences in planetariums, museums, galleries and limited IMAX release.

The movie is called *Outside In*.




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 10:14 AM
link   
That video was simply breath taking!
Can't wait to see the full project, this snippet was amazing on its own, truly awe inspiring!
S&F



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 10:58 AM
link   
I'm wordless.

2nd = Thanks S & F



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:18 AM
link   
Dazzling,
S&F OP,
Thanks for this, absolutely breathtaking, hope more stars and flags happen so we can all see this.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 09:22 AM
link   
reply to post by VirtualParadise
 


Oh absolutely, can't wait to see the whole movie myself.
Some words from the filmmaker:



I first read about Saturn and Titan in Carl Sagan’s Cosmos. In 2004, Cassini arrived at Saturn barely noticed by the world. Both exulted by the stunning images and disappointed by the lack of interest, I committed to finding a way to make a film that showcased the incredible beauty of Saturn, while exploring the reasons why most people know so little about it.


I applaud his effort to bring about more awareness of the space program, and how far out we have reached already.



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 10:01 PM
link   
reply to post by kinda kurious
 


Yes, me too! I wonder why it hasn't caught more interest

edit on 29-4-2011 by Clairaudience because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2011 @ 11:11 PM
link   
Very nice and inspiring opening post, I especially like where they say while Saturn is whirling around. It might be little known that Saturn spins really really fast, it's day is around nine hours if I'm not mistaken, which also accounts for its equatorial bulge, its quite elliptical as opposed to spherical.

I understand Jupiter spins even faster but its days are longer because its bigger than Saturn, but Saturn really looks the most distorted at the equator.



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 10:46 AM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 


Absolutely, stunning indeed!



The average distance between Saturn and the Sun is over 1 400 000 000 km (9 AU). With an average orbital speed of 9.69 km/s,[5] it takes Saturn 10,759 Earth days (or about 29½ years), to finish one revolution around the Sun.[5] The elliptical orbit of Saturn is inclined 2.48° relative to the orbital plane of the Earth.[5] Because of an eccentricity of 0.056, the distance between Saturn and the Sun varies by approximately 155 000 000 km between perihelion and aphelion,[5] which are the nearest and most distant points of the planet along its orbital path, respectively. The visible features on Saturn rotate at different rates depending on latitude and multiple rotation periods have been assigned to various regions (as in Jupiter's case): System I has a period of 10 h 14 min 00 s (844.3°/d) and encompasses the Equatorial Zone, which extends from the northern edge of the South Equatorial Belt to the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt. All other Saturnian latitudes have been assigned a rotation period of 10 h 39 min 24 s (810.76°/d), which is System II. System III, based on radio emissions from the planet in the period of the Voyager flybys, has a period of 10 h 39 min 22.4 s (810.8°/d); because it is very close to System II, it has largely superseded it.

Link



posted on Jun, 1 2011 @ 11:29 AM
link   
Simply WOW
nothing else can I say
S&F



new topics

top topics



 
10

log in

join