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The House votes to end Public funding for NPR

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posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:22 AM
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The House voted to end funding to NPR, and the measure is on its way to the Senate.

video.foxnews.com...


Its fate in the Senate is not clear.
edit on 18-3-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:58 AM
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i found it ironic that you cited a fox new link, when the topic was 'NPR' ..._javascript:icon('
')

House Votes To Cut NPR's Federal Funds

www.npr.org...



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:04 AM
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edit on 3/18/2011 by bladdersweat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:06 AM
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IMO NPR will be better without Federal funding. It's always bothered me that the fox helped to fund the chicken house anyway. In fact, at one point late last year (can't recall which thread or exactly when) I found myself in a heated debate, here on ATS, over this subject with a Fox news supporter - asserting that NPR was government funded propaganda and that Fox is the only pure news source left.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:11 AM
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Originally posted by bladdersweat
i found it ironic that you cited a fox new link, when the topic was 'NPR' ..._javascript:icon('
')

House Votes To Cut NPR's Federal Funds

www.npr.org...


Yeah its difficult for the liberal media to actually report on it, so one finds news where one can.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:15 AM
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Public Radio = Government Radio?


www.npr.org...

One of the challenges of public radio and National Public Radio in particular -- is the sense of ownership among the listeners. With the word "public" right there in the name, listeners feels they are entitled to hear their point of view on the radio.

Over the past year, hundreds of listeners have written to argue, remonstrate and generally take NPR to task for not reporting the news in precisely the way they think it should be done. Just because you feel you pay for NPR, doesn't mean it will, or should, reinforce your ideas at all times.

Public Radio = Government Radio?

The criticism usually starts with the phrase "...as a taxpayer, I object to NPR's reporting on...(take your pick)." If "public" means "government funded," then some listeners are in for a shock: NPR is not a government broadcaster.

NPR has not done a particularly good job in explaining who it is and how it operates. A much better job is done by the local stations, who feel an obligation to their listeners as to who they are, who owns the license and how the money sent in to the station gets spent.



Legally speaking, NPR is a private, not-for-profit corporation chartered by the District of Columbia and qualified by the Internal Revenue Service as a "501(c)(3)" organization exempt from taxation.

NPR is funded primarily by a single source: fees paid to NPR by public radio stations (almost 700 of them) for the right to broadcast particular NPR programs. These program fees account for slightly more than 50 percent of the annual budget, which for 2000, was just over $100 million. This is the largest single source of money for NPR and it comes overwhelmingly from the stations and their listeners.

The rest of the money comes from organizations (usually corporations) and from foundations. You hear that on the radio usually three times an hour when NPR's long-time announcer Frank Taveres intones: "Support for NPR comes from..."


..just providing some info..& links
edit on 3/18/2011 by bladdersweat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 

YES!!! and thank God! they are far too biased to liberal media, like they're trying to herd us like cattle. It's so stupid how they could not have 2 sided opinions on certain things, and boy, those over nurturing voices always gave me the CREEPS.







 
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