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Japanese workers successfully connect power cable to crippled reactor‎

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posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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www.ibtimes.com...




Japanese engineers have been able to lay an external grid power line cable to the No. 2 unit at the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan, according to The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog.

“They plan to reconnect power to unit 2 once the spraying of water on the unit 3 reactor building is completed,” IAEA said in a statement. “The spraying of water on the unit 3 reactor building was temporarily stopped at [20:09 local time].”
The IAEA said it continues to liaise with Japanese officials and is monitoring the situation as it evolves.
Emergency workers at the plant have frantically been attempting to connect a 1-kilometer long power cable from the main grid to restart the water pumps in order to cool down reactor No. 2.


Read more: www.ibtimes.com...


Fukushima plant now reasonably stable - IAEA
The International Atomic Energy Agency has said the situation at the Fukushima nuclear plant is now reasonably stable, but warned that it could get worse.
www.rte.ie...




The International Atomic Energy Agency has said the situation at Japan's earthquake-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant is now reasonably stable, but warned that it could get worse.
Helicopters have been pouring tonnes of water on the facility to try and prevent a meltdown of fuel rods.
Even though the IAEA head Yukiya Amano complained about a lack of information from Japanese authorities on the crisis, his senior aide said the situation at the plant is said to be serious but 'reasonably stable'.
'It hasn't got worse, which is positive,' he said. 'The situation remains very serious but there has been no significant worsening since yesterday.'
Japanese engineers worked through the night to restore a power cable to the damaged nuclear plant.
They hope to restart pumps needed to pour cold water on overheating fuel rods and avert a catastrophe.



Maybe this is the turning point and the reactors can be cooled

and stop a total NUCLEAR MELTDOWN!

Which one is it?

IT IS STABLE *BUT* could get worse??????

Do they know what the hell they are talking about because it makes no sense to me....

Back talk at its finest...
edit on 17-3-2011 by hillynilly because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 
This is good news indeed. Let's all pray that the start of the end of the process has now begun.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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Not a chance in hell this will work. Everything external to the core has been blown to pieces - power doesn't do you any good if all the pumps and pipes were damaged during the explosions.

Too little, too late?



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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This is good news. They are going to need lot of power.


Hopefully the source is not tainted...



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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Michio Kaku doesn't sound too optimistic about this and called it last ditch effort




posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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I can't see live electricity, damaged cables and Hydrogen being a very good combination.

I hope they know what they are doing, after all they are the experts.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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We've seen the destruction from the explosions, I have a hard time believing the cooling infrastructure is still intact.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Well, they can't really do much of ANYTHING without power of some kind, so this is in a way a bit of good news....

But I don't see them having any means to stop what is already happening even if they get power connected.

There is too much radiation. Over 15 minutes in a suit is about enough to kill you.

The infrastructure around the reactors and plant is too badly damaged.

This will only help facilitate worker needs and operational power for response teams, not for the plant itself.

I hope something good comes from this though.... fingers crossed.


S&F OP.

~Namaste



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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Now they can pump water instead of having helicopters drop it. No big deal. Maybe they can get a higher volume of water on the rods.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by xavi1000
 


Michio Kaku is going to be on Coast to Coast AM tonight with George Noory.. (will be listening)

I like Michio's radio show on Saturday night science fantastic..

He is usually spot on but he has changed his story (in this ever changing event)
a few times don't know what to think of it..

I really do hope this works, I hope the workers don't get radiation sickness from implementing this

Originally posted by splint

I bet you're mad, aren't you? Everything is becoming more stable and you're mad.


Also to the poster *your just mad it is stable*
GET REAL!
That is childish
to insinuate people that do not think
this will do a damn thing WANT A WORSE disaster or
possible more people die....


edit on 17-3-2011 by hillynilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Well it's good to hear a little positive possibility coming from there after so many destructive events so quickly.

I hope this will put an end to the concern and danger to everyone being effected by it, especially locally.
Those who have laid themselves on the line for the last week to try containing the threat of a meltdown are selfless in their sacrifice and determination.
Their names should be honored as heros.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by splint
I bet you're mad, aren't you? Everything is becoming more stable and you're mad.

It's an objective look at reality. My personal feelings have nothing to do with it.

But it was a nice attempt at flame bait on your part, anyways.


SMR

posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Mr. Kaku is the only one I have seen with the only solution to all of this.
They need to forget about saving any of those areas and just seal them up.
Dump sand and cement and cap it with a sarcophagus.

At this point they are wasting time and putting people in danger trying to cool the reactors.
By dumping the water on these spent fuel rods, your just creating radioactive steam. The amount of water being put in there is evaporating too quickly.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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this is not a feasible solution in reality. the pipes are completely disconnected from explosions, you can see it in the pics. not too mention, are they drying off all the wet electronics and electrical circuits they just dosed with water, and very salty seawater at that. all this is, is a slight of hand. watch us here while we fool you here. what a total load of crap !!



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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www.cnn.com...


Meanwhile, engineers laid a new cable to restore power to unit No. 2, the International Atomic Energy Agency reported, citing Japanese authorities. They planned to reconnect power to No. 2 once the spraying of water on the No. 3 reactor building had been completed.
In four helicopter water drops Thursday morning, little water appeared to hit the No. 3 reactor building. Video aired on NHK showed that only one of the loads appeared to drop directly on the building.


A glimmer of light at least from cnn's perspective.
edit on 17-3-2011 by hillynilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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I hope and pray for everyone that they are able to get this up and running.

But I have to agree with everyone else, How? I've seen the video's and pictures. This place is tore up. Who knows what is intact and not.
Although I will say this is the first day that it hasn't been worse than the previous day. Maybe if this works they can start to focus on the other problems.
edit on 17-3-2011 by crappiekat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:09 PM
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Realistically, this probably isn't going to do JACK SQUAT at this point.
I'm all for cementing it in though.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by SMR
Mr. Kaku is the only one I have seen with the only solution to all of this.
They need to forget about saving any of those areas and just seal them up.
Dump sand and cement and cap it with a sarcophagus.

At this point they are wasting time and putting people in danger trying to cool the reactors.
By dumping the water on these spent fuel rods, your just creating radioactive steam. The amount of water being put in there is evaporating too quickly.


In all honesty I fail to see how the air force can dump enough sand and cement to cap it. They cant even hit it with water properly. How the hell are they going to dump sand and cement on it ? They would need a steel cabled mould of some kind or the cement would just create a pile. They also would need many thousand tons of cement . What aircraft would they use to do this. Anyway the radiation will probably kill the pilot's if they get too close. If they could run dumper trucks full of wet cement up a ramp ( that doesn't exist) above the reactor buildings and bury the damn things that might work although I cant see that happening.
edit on 17-3-2011 by tarifa37 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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This just sounds ridiculous to me. Correct me if I am wrong please. Didn't they say it was not possible to connect a generator because of compatibility issues with their hookup? Now they have a 1 kilometer extension cord? How many days has it been? You mean to tell me an electrician could not hook a generator up to the plant? I don't get it?? My guess would be that it is too damaged for the pump to work. I hope I am wrong.



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