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Another sign that California is about to get the "big one"

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posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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I have been keeping an eye on the current events and the signs of whats to come. I have been searching for clues and try to see if there are another signs and this is what I have. Is the West Coast about to get hit with an earhquake this weekend around when the supermoon gets close?




BIG SUR, CA - Over 120 feet of California highway just washes away in a landslide. March 17, 2011


It states it was due to errosion, but my intuition tells me its something much more than that. I have warned some of my families and friends already and hope nothing comes out of this as this will cause civil unrest and other scenarios that I could not possibly think of. (Another Nuclear Fallout after the quake?)

Road Collapse


The links below gives another clues, its best to put all the puzzle together to get the grand scope of all of this.

Geologist

Dead Bees

Supermoon

Dead Fish
edit on 17-3-2011 by awakenone because: Add Links




posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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maybe because there had been alot of earthquakes in California.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by alex1
maybe because there had been alot of earthquakes in California.



Maybe, but with those small cluster of quakes, only time will tell.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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Or it could be that much of the Northern CA coastline is comprised of steep, earthy mountains that drop sharply into the sea, and that slides on the coast are incredibly commonplace in the late winter and spring when rains have saturated the soil?

Much of that NorCal coastline is accretionary wedging from a past subduction zone. Accretionary wedging is basically the top layers of the Pacific plate scraped off and accumulated along the coastline over millions of years, so the rock isn't as strong as say a horizontally-laid sediment formed into rock.

I grew up there, and having a chunk of highway 1 drop out wasn't much to get excited over, happens fairly regularly.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by blamethegreys
 


So you mean to say that it is common, but the patroll officers don't know what cause it. If that was the case, then this common event must have caused California a lot of money to keep repairing the roads.
Thanks for highlighting more into this.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by awakenone
 


Nature always gives plenty of clues as to her actions. If people decide not to heed her warnings, well thats their own ignorance.


thank you for the combined information. time tells.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by blamethegreys
Or it could be that much of the Northern CA coastline is comprised of steep, earthy mountains that drop sharply into the sea, and that slides on the coast are incredibly commonplace in the late winter and spring when rains have saturated the soil?

Much of that NorCal coastline is accretionary wedging from a past subduction zone. Accretionary wedging is basically the top layers of the Pacific plate scraped off and accumulated along the coastline over millions of years, so the rock isn't as strong as say a horizontally-laid sediment formed into rock.

I grew up there, and having a chunk of highway 1 drop out wasn't much to get excited over, happens fairly regularly.


Yup, I grew up out there as well. Hwy 1 was forever closed in places to fix up the mud slides, rocks falling on the road, pieces falling off the edge into the ocean. The section up near San Francisco isn't called Devil's Slide for nothing.

Its not a huge surprise. Building a road that just barely hugs the edge of a cliff next to the ocean.....Its going to have major erosion because that's how the earth works.

Most likely from the winter weather, could be earth dislodged from a small local quake, or just wear and tear on the road.

Certainly NOT a predictive sign that CA is getting a big quake.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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California had a lot of rain earlier this winter. A mudslide or washout on the coast due to erosion is not an unusual event.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by ns9504

Certainly NOT a predictive sign that CA is getting a big quake.


I am not going to argue with you, I just hope you are right. But if there is a posibility that this signs (not just the road falling off) are not taken into consideration then a lot of people in California have missed the opportunity to get into safety.

I hope it is just a gut feeling that does not go anywhere but, being hungry and reading to much ATS threads.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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Originally posted by awakenone
I have been keeping an eye on the current events and the signs of whats to come. I have been searching for clues and try to see if there are another signs and this is what I have. Is the West Coast about to get hit with an earhquake this weekend around when the supermoon gets close?
The west coast is overdue for some "big ones", everyone agrees with that.

So predicting a big earth quake is coming on the west coast is kind of like predicting the sun will rise tomorrow, everyone knows it will happen. The difference is, we can predict with great accuracy when the sun will rise, but so far we haven't figured out how to predict when earthquakes will happen. With volcanic eruptions, we usually get a little warning in advance, but not earthquakes.

To be honest your attempts to predict a coming earthquake with your intuition or totally unrelated events seems pretty lame. One of the closest things to a prediction was the Loma Prieta prediction, it happened but they were off on the timing somewhat.


From 1968 to 1988 scientists in California mapped seismic activity on a cross section of the fault lines. They identified a "seismic gap" in the Loma Prieta area from various features of the regional seismicity. They therefore concluded that Loma Prieta was due for an earthquake.[citation needed] Smaller quakes several months beforehand were treated as possible foreshocks, but the warnings had expired by the date of the moment magnitude 6.9 quake, on 17 October 1989.

You might want to read up at that link about the real science that's been done in an effort to predict earthquakes. It's a challenge. I think the problem is, there are too many unknown and difficult to measure variables which determine how much pressure the plates will build up before they finally slip. We have made some progress understanding some of those variables but still have a long way to go.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by awakenone
Is the West Coast about to get hit with an earhquake this weekend around when the supermoon gets close?



Originally posted by Arbitrageur

To be honest your attempts to predict a coming earthquake with your intuition or totally unrelated events seems pretty lame.


I appreciate the information I will soon look this up.

On another note, If you look at the sentence closely I was not predicting the events that "IT" will happen, I was asking a question "?" "Thesis statement" trying to draw points of views from other ATS members. My intuition is my point of view as drawn upon from the patterns that I have gathered, Mine alone.

Tell me what you think about the significance of these links happening in one state and my theory and not about me "predicting" such an event.

If you think is hog wash then you are entitled to your own opinion and I will respect that. Your critical thinking is much appreciated.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by awakenone
On another note, If you look at the sentence closely I was not predicting the events that "IT" will happen, I was asking a question "?"
If that was the only thing you said I'd agree you were just asking a question. But then you went on to say:


Originally posted by awakenone
I have warned some of my families and friends already
That's why it's past asking a question, you're passing out "warnings".


Tell me what you think about the significance of these links happening in one state and my theory and not about me "predicting" such an event.
I can see a remote possibility a supermoon might help trigger an earthquake that was already about to happen anyway. Did you see the movie "True Lies"? The van is teetering off the edge of the blown out bridge and about to fall into the sea. A bird lands on the van and that's just enough to stop the teetering and cause it to fall into the sea maybe a little faster than it would have otherwise. But normally a bird landing on a van won't cause the van to fall into the sea, just like a supermoon won't trigger an earthquake unless possibly one is about to happen already anyway.

In that analogy, the supermoon is the bird and the van is the earthquake, so at least there's the remotest possibility for a link.

But what possible link could there be between bees and earthquakes for example?



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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We're on a watch this weekend, in fact today is the start of this moon cycle seismic window. Saturday and Sunday are the two most important days. I also have heard about the ring of fire. Activity has already occurred in New Zealand and Japan.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
*UPDATE* Jim Berkland (Geologist), W Coast Quake window starts March 19 2011 *ATS Experiment Added*


edit on 17-3-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

But what possible link could there be between bees and earthquakes for example?



My warning for my family is more of a survivalist instinct response, but enough of that. I do appreciate your analogy and the linking that a remote possibility that the supermoon might trigger an earthquake. I slightly comprehend that a gravitational differences might be the culprit? But regardless of what it may, the occurence of it will have an impact, major or minor I don't know, we will find out.

Also, my theory about the bees diying off might have to do with electromagnetic anomalies that an earthquake produce similar to animals acting incoherent or unease before an earthquake strikes. What is your take on this?



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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Originally posted by awakenone
Also, my theory about the bees diying off might have to do with electromagnetic anomalies that an earthquake produce similar to animals acting incoherent or unease before an earthquake strikes. What is your take on this?
That's addressed in the link I posted earlier: en.wikipedia.org...


Animal behavior reports are often ambiguous and not consistently observed. In folklore, some animals have been identified as being more able to predict earthquakes than others, especially dogs, cats, chickens, horses, toads and other smaller animals.

It has been postulated that the reported animal behavior before an earthquake is simply their response to an increase in low-frequency electromagnetic signals.[18] The University of Colorado has demonstrated that electromagnetic activity can be generated by the fracturing of crystalline rock. Such activity occurs in fault lines before earthquakes. According to one study, electromagnetic sensors yield statistically valid results in predicting earthquakes.[19]

In Italy, findings from 2009 suggest that toads are able to detect pre-seismic cues.
I'm not that skeptical of electromagnetic sensors detecting early cues, but I'm slightly skeptical of stories about animals having similar detection capabilities. It doesn't seem impossible but it will take some better research than we have to be really convincing to me. But even if this is proven true, I don't see how the electromagnetic frequencies would kill bees, because of the low frequencies involved:

www.scientificexploration.org...

In the last five years, we have detected impulsive noise bursts of seismogenic
emissions at 82 kHz, 1.525 kHz, and 36 Hz using our multipoint
detection network around the Tokyo region and Izu peninsula.
Those low frequencies are not in any way injurious to life. AM radio is 535kHz to 1700 kHz and it's not high enough to hurt anything, nor are FM frequencies from 87.5 to 108 Mhz.

Much much higher frequencies can harm animals, like X-rays or gamma rays, but to my knowledge no such frequencies have ever been observed in relation to earthquakes, nor are they likely to be observed at harmful frequencies.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by awakenone
It states it was due to errosion, but my intuition tells me its something much more than that.


You don't think that the heaviest rainstorm in 50 years, the fact it is packed beach sand, the fact that it is a 70 degree slope, undermined by cutting the highway too close had anything to do with the slide?

I go with the erosion.


SMR

posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by LS650
California had a lot of rain earlier this winter. A mudslide or washout on the coast due to erosion is not an unusual event.

THIS !

I already posted the same answer in another thread, about this same topic ... They had a lot of rain and also this was built in like 1930. Pretty old piece of road

This has happened before to this exact same stretch of road. Why they keep fixing it to only fail again, who knows. Probably the historic factor.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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I have been watching hisz.rsoe.hu... over the last few days and have seen a lot of small earthquakes in California



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Thanks for the update, I will be watching as well. During that time I will be outside with a telescope moon gazing.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 01:31 AM
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Another sign that California is about to get the "big one"

YES

Janky Red grubbed on too much Taco Bell

The toilet is crying preemptively

California, you've been warned




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