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St Patrick's day; Why do you people even care?

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posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:27 AM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


I figured that might go over some peoples heads.




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:43 AM
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Well i never really knew about st patricks day, until the year i got the the hell pinched out of me. For not wearing green. I started to care after back to back years of not wearing green. Till this day, i had to wear green.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 03:07 PM
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Hey folks, the party isn't over;

Who's up for a big St Cyril's day bash?


Everybody celebrates St Cyril day, right?

Anyone, anyone...




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by CastleMadeOfSand
It is not the Irish we are celebrating. It is not Catholics we are celebrating. It is St. Patrick himself. Why would white people celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day? Make sense?





So you're not celebrating Catholicism but you're celebrating a guy who converted a bunch of people to Catholicism? That makes sense.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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I have an Irish great-grandparent on my family tree. Most of the people I work with do also.

Like most "family moments," and in common with weddings and funeral, it is a "roll check" to see if you still count yourself as one of the tribe.

As people assimilate, they lose more and more contact with their original culture and its memory. Diluted the most, you end up with a single "holiday" which is a time to call your kin observe a basically civil ceremony (lighting a tree, lighting a menorah, watching a parade) and eating or drinking something special: turkey, beer, sake, whiskey, tamales, vodka, etc.

It ends up being a folk memory, like Halloween or St Steven's Day wren for the Irish themselves.

Incidentally, the American "Irish tradition" of corned beef and cabbage goes back, not to Ireland, but to the kosher deli shops of Manhattan---they saw a chance to sell inexpensive food that was easy to cook for a large crowd, and sell it to immigrants who came together at holidays in one relative's apartment where there were lots of people to feed but only a tiny kitchen. Kind of primitive take-out.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:37 AM
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I don't like it at all. Too much drink!!



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