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Is natural, Afro-American hair bad?

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posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:09 AM
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There seems to be a lot of conversation about this topic as of late and although, I am not one to be racist or anything like that I love a good debate and many of the times I've seen this debate it has been a good one. One of the reasons I love ATS is that the debates and issues I start in threads are not mine, but yours. All those who read this and respond to it.

Nappy, crinkly, coarse, etc. Have been ways that some have described the Afro-American hair. I am amazed how much the Afro-American community has given to the world. Music, clothing, words and slang, a great many things of what surrounds us today revolves around the Afro-American community. Evidently, hair is not one of the things that have made the cross over into pop culture.

Black women spend so much on hair products to chemically straighten their hair, it has been estimated that they can spend over $20,000 annum and up to 70% of the market in hair care product (Tyra Banks Show). This seems amazing and obscene to me considering that my hair is less than a quarter inch long, bu I also realize I am not the norm or of Afro-American decent.

Those with a close eye will note the statistics were relayed to me by the Tyra Banks show by a friend, however, the same person who brought this subject up on her own show is just as guilty of doing this. I was told that Tyra wore her hair in Corn Rows during the episode. Funny, I have seen Tyra Banks quite a bit and I don't remember too many times she walked around with an Afro or Corn Rows prior to this.

Personal grip aside.

Was this issue created by the beauty community just to sell products or is this something that blacks have done to themselves? Do blacks with their natural hair face issues of discrimination due solely on the type of hair they naturally have? Does the Afro-American's hair pose a negative projection one them? Does their hair somehow make them different than someone who is Indian, Latino or white? What would it take to bring the natural Afro-American hair to the limelight as acceptable? Or is this another way to try and keep those of African American decent under and continued to be procieved as "lessers"?

I would like to ask that everyone be nice here. Please do not post racist comments or things like that. I would hope that this debate can be had without that type of low-life comments.

edit on 15-3-2011 by Jkd Up because: Ooops... 4got a point...




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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The American culture has basically embedded the idea in black people that they are bad, hair is bad, skin color is bad, etc., and shows like Tyra and the other Oprah there, don't know her name, the black Tori Spelling looking transvestite on daytime TV... they all press the culture onto the sponge minds that watch these God awful shows.

Watch this video, it fits perfect here...

edit on 15-3-2011 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by Jkd Up
 


In my opinion it is something they have done to themselves. It comes with the whole racism thing....They want to be accepted and think that they would look more attractive with straight or Caucasian/Asian looking hair. It has not gotten to a point where some of them bleach themselves to lighten their complex and wear blue/green contacts. The guys don't really seem to be making such a big deal out of it.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by Jkd Up
 


It ain't that bad if you "got that good hair..." as in " C'mon you know him....he's the one with that good hair.." ever heard that? Haha I have PLENTY!



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by Jkd Up
 


I may be oversimplifying things, but I think it just boils down to the fact girls like messing with their hair. Of course the beauty industry & social conditioning plays it's part in that, but every colour and creed of woman teases, stretches, dyes & god knows what else.

Personally apart from the black dye I've religiously poured on my noggin since the age of 15, I seldom do much. It's too long and too straight and I'm too plain lazy to wrestle with it or part with cash for someone else to do it for me.





posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:27 AM
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I don't think it has anything to do with racism or racial self image or anything so dramatic.
Women (not all, but most) like to change their look periodically, I'm not sure why. Their hair is a major component in this. When their hair is naturally curly, or "kinky", their options are more limited as far as what can be done with it. When straightened, a whole new world of options/styles opens up. In addition, when a group mostly has the same type of hair, it's harder to get an "individual" look.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:33 AM
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From what I remember the first Fashion Magazine in the world
was published in England by two ladies who also sold
their own hair straightening products in the back.

If the Wright Brothers get credit for flight,
then it is arguable that these two ladies
invented the entire Fashion industry.


David Grouchy



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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It's simply a case of beauty standard. Right now, a certain look for hair is in fashion, and everyone wants that hair regardless of their natural race.... and with all the fake hair available, it's easy to get what you want now days. No one even bothers with taming their hair anymore, they just get a weave.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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WOW.....I actually cried when the little girl with the blonde wig was answering questions.....the reason I cried is because she is so ADORABLE.....so perfectly beautiful....and she doesn't like herself. It broke my heart. All those children were so precious, this just really touched me.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by Serizawa
 


I am black girl myself and I used to have weaves and chemically straighten my hair, and its true, as much of us don't want to accept it, we want to be accepted. Most of us were taught at a young age, that straight hair is pretty and acceptable. Nappy hair isn't acceptable. And we must chemically straighten it to be accepted. The hair industry makes billions off of weaves, relaxers, and such. 3 years ago I snapped out of it and started to grow dreads. I actually cant believe I use to do that to my body and hair. So much poison. Nowadays I see more and more women wearing their hair naturally and its beautiful. We have to understand that we don't have straight Caucasian Asian hair. That our hair is beautiful and much more healthy naturally.

S+F this is a great thread.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:49 AM
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edit on 15-3-2011 by Immortalgemini527 because: In a positive mood today,will not let the dark side taint the light.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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It is the results of euro-centrism being prominent and more acceptable in the black community as of late. You want to look more European, not African, therefore, straighten your hair out. A nappy head, cornrows, etc. etc. can be seen as "ghetto" but that isn't always the case.

If you look at the 90s' black culture and compared it with today, blacks were highly interested in Afro-centric fashion, hair, and culture. Their black heritage was still important and relevant as opposed today, it seems. There was a revival, almost, of the 1960s' black culture to a certain extent. Sure, there were large amounts of violence and drugs but there was also a large percentage of blacks trying to make something of themselves and get away from the gang culture that is so prevalent in some cities.

Today though, it does not seem that way. Hip-hop culture has become the dominant force in the black community, and to a certain extent, it's problematic because it lacks a true educational value. Cornrows, nappy head, and even a beautiful afro on a black woman may be considered "hip-hop" rather than an expression of black culture.

Do you see what I am getting at? Hip-hop culture has replaced black culture. Black culture promotes education, unity, political awareness, black history, and family values, while hip-hop culture celebrates black culture through music, fashion, individuality, language, and expression.


Should we blame blacks for this move to be more euro-centric? Possibly. However, I honestly think there has always been a hidden motive in keeping blacks confused and take their attention away from what's most important.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by Immortalgemini527
 


All women spend tons of money on their hair, but black women really do spend a lot more. Like I said I am black myself and spent a good chunk of my life in hair salons every week and its close to $200 and up to get a relaxer and weave. Its insane!



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by DevilJin
 


You are absolutely correct. Well said. I couldn't agree more.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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Is natural, Afro-American hair bad?

being an older white guy.

HELL NO!

i always thought ross and the supremes even tina turner didn't look right.

what i don't like is the corn rows and the williams gals look.

it's not natural, is what i am saying.



edit on 15-3-2011 by fooks because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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Blacks were victimized by Euro influence for many years. As a youth they would often hear things such as "good hair/bad hair" or "good complexion/bad complexion".

However I think most black people are over this now. Many black people where their hair natural and those who don't and still process their hair do it merely as a way of being different.

Another can of worms is the discrimination blacks can encounter while searching for employment. I work in the employment field and I had one company owner instruct me "not to send anyone over with dreads".

I asked one guy who wears dreads if he faces discrimination due to his hair style and he replied "Yes, but not for the reason you think. It's not because Euro-America doesn't understand it (dreadlocks)...the ones who DO understand it, fear it." Apparently there are those in white America who dislike dreadlocks because it isn't the norm to see, but then there are those who have knowledge and understand the symbolism of dreadlocks.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by somuchhtosay41
 


You are so right.....beauty does not come in one form....it has MANY forms, each beautiful in their own way.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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When you live in a predominantly white culture, it's going to be extremely difficult to try not to conform to it in some ways. The best way to find out how people react is to ask those who live among a culture of a race other than theirs. If I were living in Japan surrounded by beautiful Japanese girls with Japanese TV shows and Japanese media telling me what's beautiful, chances are I might start thinking that looking Japanese would be a good way to blend into that society. As they say, people of a feather flock together. It's only natural to want to blend in instead of stand out like a sore thumb.

Every culture has different beauty standards. There are African tribes who think it's beautiful to scar the skin, stretch the earlobes, or deform some part of the body. Girls and men living in that tribe are forced to conform to these standards of beauty, even though they are extremely painful.

That video with kids feeling inadequate or exhibiting behavior that suggests they feel that way is heart-wrenching. However I do have to ask where they get their ideas from. They are far too young to make their own decisions, so who is putting these thoughts into their heads? It would have to be people closest to them, i.e. their parents, grandparents, friends, relatives, etc. TV is part of it, but that's where parents come in and turn that crap off, or have a little talk with them about the realities of the world.

I have more to say on this topic, but I'll stop here for now.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Serizawa
 


A very interesting point. Black guys are not following the women in this particular case. Though, seeing a black man with long hair in itself is not as common.

Thanks for your input!



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by Suspiria
 


First off, I'd like to note that I fear Goth women. In all the right ways


All that aaside... You may have boiled it down to simple, true, but perhaps brilliant. A wonderful out look. Thank you! Star.




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