It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fourth Reactor hit by Blast/Fire. 3rd Reactor reading deadly Levels of Radiation.

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 12:46 AM
link   

Fourth Reactor hit by Blast/Fire. 3rd Reactor reading deadly Levels of Radiation.


en.rian.ru

The agency also reported that the 4th reactor was also hit by a blast, caused by the build-up of hydrogen.


(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.marketwatch.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
abovetopsecret.com...
abovetopsecret.com...
abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 12:46 AM
link   
The fourth Reactor at the Fukushima Plant caught Fire and released radioactive particles. Radioactive Steam continues to rise.

3rd reactor is reading deadly levels of radiation

Tokyo reporting Radiation that is 23x normal.

Evacuation zone keeps expanding.

Full Meltdown in progress.

Sounds pretty bad. Let's hope this can be contained but its looking like a full-blown double disaster.


en.rian.ru
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 12:50 AM
link   
Just heard this on CNN...

www.abc.net.au...

Japanese officials warning everyone within 30 miles to stay indoors. Radiation is now harmful to human health. When they announced this on CNN and asked the expert who had up to this point been stoically optimistic about everything that was going what he thought this meant... he took a moment to wish to almost pray for the Japanese people and almost on the verge of tears said that this is very very serious... then then cut to commercial.....



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 12:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by wisintel

Japanese officials warning everyone within 30 miles to stay indoors. Radiation is now harmful to human health.


I'm thinking that it was a dire situation the entire time, it's, I'm guessing, because they started having some trouble keeping the information from the public.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:00 AM
link   
What happens if the entire facility goes? How bad is it going to be in Japan and the immediate surrounding areas?



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:02 AM
link   
I only people can quit being in denial and come clean(Japanese government)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:05 AM
link   
Things are not developing well.

It's now the 15th, let's see how it goes.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:06 AM
link   
Maybe I am not expert in nuclear facility, but why can't they either turn it off or pour concrete into the rod to seal it up now to prevent radiation leaking? (I think turn off will not work as nuclear is still raw and active, but concrete isn't bad idea) What are they waiting for or trying to save the nuclear facility? My only concern is nuclear fallout toward US' citizen as the wind current is perfect horizon from Japan to US.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:08 AM
link   
No one escapes the wrath of Charlie Sheen!



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:13 AM
link   
reply to post by Aslpride
 


Concrete would have little to no affect on the radiation itself or the leak. I don't know if it would exactly hurt the problem but I know it would not help.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:20 AM
link   
reply to post by Aslpride
 


With that amount of heat, I doubt the concrete would be able to change into a solid form.

With as innovative as the Japanese are, I still can't get over how badly they messed up on this one. I know nuclear plants need a large source of water, but you don't build along a coast in the area where a major tsunami could happen. Unbelievable.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:29 AM
link   
reply to post by Aslpride
 


The fact they are pumping sea water mixed with boron to cool it shows they are not trying to save the facilities.

Concrete is a fine idea, but exactly how do you propose this is done with the radiation, heat and explosive gases? First and foremost, they must cool the core down to a safe level, then they can think about containment.

It isn't as simple as "turning it off" or just laying a new car park over the top, otherwise they would have done it already.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:33 AM
link   
reply to post by edgecrusher2199
 


The fact that the reactors are by the sea is what has actually stopped these things going sky high.

Also, it can hardly be said that Tsunami's are "highly likely" as they aren't. This is the only Tsunami these regions have suffered in 100 years, at least and certainly the biggest ever on record. I am sure they planned for "average" Tsunami's, but this was way and above. Anywhere on a cost is at risk of a Tsunami, anywhere.

New York is at risk of a collosal Tsunami if an earthquake shakes loose a massive underwater ledge near the Canaries. it would make the one from this Earthquake look like a ripple. I suppose the US is "irresponsible" for building a city and Nuclear plants along it's eastern coast?



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:36 AM
link   
If that core melts through the floor, would it not go into the Pacific Ocean?



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by amatrine
If that core melts through the floor, would it not go into the Pacific Ocean?


That would be quite deadly to sea life/food supply.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 01:47 AM
link   
reply to post by amatrine
 


No.

The Japanese have considered the "China Syndrome" and have a large concrete barrier under the reactor. Second to that, the chances of the reactor core melting through anym more than a few tens of metres of the bedrock is almost nil. The rock itself would absorb most of the heat.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 04:57 AM
link   
Bad news...

Expert now on live saying explosion at #2 was the worst as there is a containment breach. #1 was just a hydrogen explosion and #3 is exposing the spent fuel. #4 was shut down a month ago but still has spent fuel.

Okay he just stated that #5 and #6 are also in danger as cooling has failed there as well and they are watching that This is the first time I heard #5 and #6 mentioned

www.livestation.com...


Report cycles...



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 05:22 AM
link   
reply to post by zorgon
 


thanks for the links
this is really bad news
all this type of reactor is suseptable to meltdown if emergency activation coincides with loss of out side power supply
all of them will go up in smoke
i count 5 in trouble

xploder



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:20 AM
link   
reply to post by Aslpride
 


The reactors which are in danger are in a position where merely turning off the power, means a significant increase in the risk of a containment failiure, and resultant explosion, the throwoff from which would be terrifyingly radioactive, and spew potentialy hundreds of meters into the air, before being blown away on the wind, and dependant on windspeed, height of the plume, and various other meteorological factors, may fall on populated areas of not just Japan, but any region which is within range of the predicted spread of the radiological matter in the cloud. Things as they are mean that for some of the reactors, they can at least attempt to control how serious any detonations, exposures and so on, may be.
The trouble with the concrete idea , is that apart from the fact that concrete wont do an awful lot, it would be impossible to get the man power, or the machinery necessary to carry out such an operation, into the hotzone without putting every member of the work force in serious danger of radiation related death. It would be close to suicide, even in the best rad proof suit you could get hold of, to go near ANY of those reactors for more than half an hour, and it would take significant amounts of time to perform any filling operation to a standard which would render the idea meritable.
Furthermore, you have to look at Chrenobyl, and the sarcophagus that they built there , to understand the material density required to contain seriously radioactive matter. Yes, the situation was different there, but the solution to exposed , melted reactors, is pretty much going to have to be the same, but for modern alterations in terms of the chemical composition of any proposed material used to clad the thing.
The trouble with nuclear power plants, is that in the event of a catastrophic failiure of any significant part of the saftey structure, like the cooling systems for instance, you run the risk of putting in motion a chain of events which cannot pheasibly be prevented from running thier course. After a certain point, the detonations that we have seen, and the resulting damage to containment of the fuel rods, and exposure of spent rods, is almost certain. You have to catch potential problems so damned early, and have response teams in full ready mode, and on the scene in minuites to prevent the sort of trouble we are seeing here.
Realisticaly speaking, that was never going to happen during a major hydrological disaster, and in a quake zone.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:11 AM
link   
On Going Discussion

Please contribute there

Closing

Thank you

Semper




top topics



 
7

log in

join